F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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snowday
Hi - Have been reading a lot of these posts and thank you all for so much good information.  We have a 14 year old son (late bloomer, small stature and not through puberty yet) who spiraled into restrictive ED over the summer. He has always been a picky eater and has lots of foods he never liked (milk, cream sauces, shakes, juice, smoothies for example).  We are weight restoring at home with weekly visits to nutritionist, pediatrician and therapist.  Refeeding was ok at first, about a pound per week, and now it has stalled out with about 10-12 lbs to go and we are looking for any advice on very calorie-dense foods to get weight onto kid who doesn't like smoothies or juice, especially from anyone who had a kid with similar issues.  Thanks in advance!
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keeptrukin
Hi,
How about donuts, pasta with butter and cheese, banana bread fortified with lots of butter, nuts, and chocolate chips and of course much larger portions? The real trick in refeeding (we had a 12-year-old son with RAN) is volume. My son resisted the smoothies (though did eat them) and once really weight restored we let him cut them out. That said, he still drinks a lot of chocolate milk.
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KLB
Hi ekkpdx. I have a 15 year old son who will only drink water so smoothies, juices, milk (except in food), other liquids are a no go for us right now like you. Sauces are included in this too. Its frustrating because you could get so many calories into a relatively small smoothie!

I use a fair bit of peanut butter, avocados, and we rely on porridge oats for breakfast and last meal of the day. If I can get cheese, butter, oils into dishes I will. I basically had to learn to cook things differently.

Supplements/powders like complan or benecalorie can be added to different things too.

I've also found a protein bar called carb killa which is low in sugar and contains 200-240 calories per bar depending on the flavour.

Will your son eat porridge oats? Here is a recipe for a higher calorie version;

50g oats
2 tbsp rapeseed oil
2 tbsp double cream
Complan banana flavour sachet
2 tbsp ground almonds
1 tbsp Breakfast boost seed crunch
1 tbsp desiccated coconut
200mls whole milk
Chopped banana
=1433 calories

One of my new year resolutions is to get my son drinking smoothies.
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scaredmom

ekkpdx,
I welcome you to the forum. I do hope that you find the support and information you need.

You have been given great advice so far. 

May I ask what your son is eating at the moment? We could help with increasing calories in what he is eating right now. 
Adding cream, protein powders, cheese, oils, butter, to everything, may help. Benecalorie can be added to things too and packs a punch calorie wise. 
I used to actually fry meat in oil (ground beef, anything really).

Please ask all the questions you have. We are all ears.
I am glad you found us. We all really want to help.
XXX

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Foodsupport_AUS
My D also didn't drink smoothies or shakes when ill. It was hard enough to keep her eating anything so the only way forward was fortifying what looked like low calorie meals.I added butter to everything in cooking, added extra oils to things like pasta and rice - they both soak oils up very well and it adds to the flavour. The upshot of it was though, that she did need larger footprint meals all because those that would have been lower volume she was unable to eat. Since it seems he has ARFID can you let us know what he does eat? You may also find it helpful reading through Honeybadger's thread. Her son had ARFID and is now doing brilliantly, and all from only a tiny number of foods.
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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snowday
Thank you so, so much. This is very helpful. 

For higher calorie foods, my son so far eats scrambled eggs (we add heavy cream), oatmeal (we add cream but don't want to add so much that he notices), sandwiches - without spreads ever, tacos in flour tortillas, pasta Bolognese that I sneak lots of oil and cheese into (he prefers red to cream sauce), hamburger on a bun without sauce or cheese, Indian and Thai curry over rice (we put lots of butter in the rice), pumpkin/banana bread or gingerbread loaded with cream and almond flour.  For challenge foods he will eat a single slice of pizza, a couple of cookies, or a brownie but gets really freaked out if we push that too many times per day.  We keep trying to increase volume of these but he isn't gaining enough weight!!

He only drinks water, has always only drunk water!  Liquid nutrition would be a hard sell for him I fear.

Any ideas would be so welcome!!
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atdt31_US
ekkpdx wrote:
Thank you so, so much. This is very helpful. 

For higher calorie foods, my son so far eats scrambled eggs (we add heavy cream), oatmeal (we add cream but don't want to add so much that he notices), sandwiches - without spreads ever, tacos in flour tortillas, pasta Bolognese that I sneak lots of oil and cheese into (he prefers red to cream sauce), hamburger on a bun without sauce or cheese, Indian and Thai curry over rice (we put lots of butter in the rice), pumpkin/banana bread or gingerbread loaded with cream and almond flour.  For challenge foods he will eat a single slice of pizza, a couple of cookies, or a brownie but gets really freaked out if we push that too many times per day.  We keep trying to increase volume of these but he isn't gaining enough weight!!

He only drinks water, has always only drunk water!  Liquid nutrition would be a hard sell for him I fear.

Any ideas would be so welcome!!



Hi - in trying to up the caloric content of some of what he already eats, maybe you could try:
1.  adding cheese to the scrambled eggs.  Cream cheese melts into it pretty well and sort of disappears (try sour cream and chive for flavor if he'd be okay with the taste);

2.  Ground nuts can be disguised in some of the stuff you mention -- not sure about hamburger, but maybe.  For sure could go in the breads and baked goods like cookie.    Grind really fine and they should not be detectable.  Adds a lot of fat, protein, calories;

3. You say you add butter to the Thai rice -- rice also absorbs oils well and oil can be a bigger punch than butter (1 tbl canola or rapeseed oil is about double the calories of one tbl butter).  I sometimes toast the raw rice in oil and then cook with the butter or add the butter to the sauce so you get the taste of the butter and bonus invisible calories of the oil

4. does do any peanut butter?  it sure has a lot of calories in a small footprint.  Could you bake some into the cookies?  or mix with Nutella for a dip for apples or bananas?  

5.  Would he eat a small single serve pizza instead of slice -- visually, it is still one thing.  A Ramos individual pizza is very small, guessing 5 inches diameter and the cheese version is 330 calories .... it looks small so if the idea of eating a "whole pizza" is not something he would focus on, but rather, here is this one very small thing to eat, maybe that would be a good snack type option.  

6. Finally, take an hour and read the bread and bun and tortilla packages -- there is a surprising difference in calories and fat from brand to brand.  My kid is pretty picky but if your kid is less picky, maybe switching buns (not necessarily a bunch bigger, just different ingredients) or breads could add.  I was surprised at the variance ...

7.  if he eats scrambled eggs, and also eats tortillas, would he eat a breakfast burrito -- that tortilla would add a lot of punch to the egg meal...

8.  My kid does not eat bagels, but given your list of things your son will eat, I thought maybe he would. .. they packs lot of punch.  Also, since he'll eat pumpkin bread, maybe you could see if he'd eat some of the muffins that are on this site -- or maybe steal some of the ingredients to add to your pumpkin bread to increase its calories.  I will look for that recipe and see if I can add it -- I think if you do a search for muffins (maybe Laura's muffins?) you'll find it referenced in several threads. 








Mom of either pre-diagnosis or non-ed underweight 12 yoa (as of March 2018) kid here to learn how to achieve weight gain.  BMI steadily in the mid 12's for nearly her entire life.  Born 2006. UPDATE:  April 2018 diagnosed ARFID, based solely on weight being less than 75% of Ideal Body Weight.  Mildly picky, but mostly the problem is a volume/early satiety issue, along with abdominal discomfort and chronic constipation, all present since birth. FWIW ED-D is a fraternal twin and we have no other kids.
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snowday
Thank you so much for all these ideas.  My son has also been a very picky eater and very slight since birth, and he dislikes some of the things your daughter dislikes, like bagels - and cream cheese.  Looking back he definitely has always had some sort of ARFID but it was starting to clear as he hit 9 or 10 years old, trying new foods and sauces(!) and even being a bit daring with his food options.  Then at around 13 it started sliding back and at 14 we are fully restricted.  Shocking how fast it happened.  We are realizing that one of his biggest issues is consistently portion size and eating all his food, so we are trying to increase caloric density at the same time we put our foot down and require him to finish the whole plate full of whatever it is.  Fingers crossed we make a little headway in the next couple weeks.  ED is stubborn and so manipulative!

atdt31_US wrote:



Hi - in trying to up the caloric content of some of what he already eats, maybe you could try:
1.  adding cheese to the scrambled eggs.  Cream cheese melts into it pretty well and sort of disappears (try sour cream and chive for flavor if he'd be okay with the taste);

2.  Ground nuts can be disguised in some of the stuff you mention -- not sure about hamburger, but maybe.  For sure could go in the breads and baked goods like cookie.    Grind really fine and they should not be detectable.  Adds a lot of fat, protein, calories;

3. You say you add butter to the Thai rice -- rice also absorbs oils well and oil can be a bigger punch than butter (1 tbl canola or rapeseed oil is about double the calories of one tbl butter).  I sometimes toast the raw rice in oil and then cook with the butter or add the butter to the sauce so you get the taste of the butter and bonus invisible calories of the oil

4. does do any peanut butter?  it sure has a lot of calories in a small footprint.  Could you bake some into the cookies?  or mix with Nutella for a dip for apples or bananas?  

5.  Would he eat a small single serve pizza instead of slice -- visually, it is still one thing.  A Ramos individual pizza is very small, guessing 5 inches diameter and the cheese version is 330 calories .... it looks small so if the idea of eating a "whole pizza" is not something he would focus on, but rather, here is this one very small thing to eat, maybe that would be a good snack type option.  

6. Finally, take an hour and read the bread and bun and tortilla packages -- there is a surprising difference in calories and fat from brand to brand.  My kid is pretty picky but if your kid is less picky, maybe switching buns (not necessarily a bunch bigger, just different ingredients) or breads could add.  I was surprised at the variance ...

7.  if he eats scrambled eggs, and also eats tortillas, would he eat a breakfast burrito -- that tortilla would add a lot of punch to the egg meal...

8.  My kid does not eat bagels, but given your list of things your son will eat, I thought maybe he would. .. they packs lot of punch.  Also, since he'll eat pumpkin bread, maybe you could see if he'd eat some of the muffins that are on this site -- or maybe steal some of the ingredients to add to your pumpkin bread to increase its calories.  I will look for that recipe and see if I can add it -- I think if you do a search for muffins (maybe Laura's muffins?) you'll find it referenced in several threads. 








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tina72
Did you try Benecalorie? It has no taste and can be added to rice and sauces and it has 330 calories with 44 ml so really a lot for this small amount.
Also great are vegetarian pattys, you can fry them in a lot of oil and then leave them in the pan and they will suck all the oil up and you just need to rewarm them.

If his fear food list is more than 10 items I think you must work on that...try to seperate what he did not eat all his life and what he started to restrict about a year before you recognised that something is going on (in most cases AN moved in much earlier than the parents realised it).
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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