F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

Welcome to F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum. This is a free service provided for parents of those suffering from eating disorders. It is moderated by kind, experienced, parent caregivers trained to guide you in how to use the forum and how to find resources to help you support your family member. This forum is for parents of patients with all eating disorder diagnoses, all ages, around the world.

Join these conversations already in progress:
• Road To Recovery - Stories of Hope
• Events for Parents and Caregivers Around the World
• Free F.E.A.S.T Conference Videos

Visit the F.E.A.S.T website for information and support.

If you need help using the forum please reach out to one of the moderators (listed below), or email us at bronwen@feast-ed.org.

Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
toothfairy

Avatar / Picture

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 2,613
Reply with quote  #1 
http://ucsdhealthsciences.tumblr.com/post/159989112425/whats-weight-got-to-do-with-it
__________________
Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
Mamaroo

Avatar / Picture

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 711
Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks Toothfairy! Brilliant article. Weight loss is actually one of the last signs of an eating disorder.
__________________
D became obsessed with exercise at age 9. Started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. She is back to her old happy self and can eat anything put in front of her. Now working on intuitive eating.
toothfairy

Avatar / Picture

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 2,613
Reply with quote  #3 
Yes!
__________________
Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
Torie

Avatar / Picture

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 5,455
Reply with quote  #4 
THanks, TF!  It's great that you are helping get the word out about this.  My d was never technically "underweight," but she was still very ill.  We were lucky that her friends sounded the alarm (persistently) so that we stepped in early.  It made our journey so much "easier" than the typical saga where AN is not treated until the equivalent of Stage 3 or Stage 4 cancer.  SO MUCH BETTER TO STEP IN EARLY!!!

But with the state of things right now, people (read: "professionals") think you're especially over-concerned, helicopterish, and slightly nuts to adamantly require full nutrition with full supervision when your kid never even crossed the threshold into "underweight," never lost her period, etc.

Glad to know UCSD is working on this.  CHOP is another leading the way. xx

-Torie

__________________
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
needhelp

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #5 
This is so validating because I noticed some strange symptoms first - the changes in hair health (even took her to a dermatologist), and some other seemingly unrelated "symptoms" which presented prior to the real weight loss.  We were fortunate that she called from school and told me (hadn't seen her).  This is the type of information that needs to be shared at schools and through various programs - we should not all be left waiting for the last and most destructive symptom to emerge. Thank you so very much for sharing - I am always thankful to have found this sight - you all are so amazing!!
Torie

Avatar / Picture

Caregiver
Registered:
Posts: 5,455
Reply with quote  #6 
I'm confused.  I seem to be reading this differently than everyone else. To me, they seem to be saying that symptoms can show up after even a small(ish) weight loss, with the patient still in the normal BMI range.  I am not seeing anything about other symptoms preceding weight loss, but rather that other symptoms can appear before the weight loss has become extreme (i.e., that the patient can be quite ill at what might be thought to be a "normal" weight, although a lower weight than previous). 

Curious.  xx

-Torie

__________________
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
Foodsupport_AUS

Avatar / Picture

Lead Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 3,955
Reply with quote  #7 
Torie that is my reading too. 

Quote:
The study found that approximately 63 percent of patients first experienced amenorrhea, the absence of menstruation, in the mild AN severity category and more than one-third reported amenorrhea at an objectively normal BMI (at or above 18.5 kg/m2).


and 
Quote:
The results highlight the importance of clinician assessment of weight history, not just current weight, and awareness of serious symptoms that may appear at a normal weight and could predict severe anorexia nervosa later.” 


Weight loss can be subtle, not evident or present but apparently "healthy" - yet there are other signs of malnutrition present. This really adds backing to those who feel that something is not right but because their child is in a "healthy" range their concerns are dismissed.

__________________
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

WTadmin