F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

Welcome to F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum. This is a free service provided for parents of those suffering from eating disorders. It is moderated by kind, experienced, parent caregivers trained to guide you in how to use the forum and how to find resources to help you support your family member. This forum is for parents of patients with all eating disorder diagnoses, all ages, around the world.

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Scaredmom2019
Interesting. I wonder why a higher comorbidity with bulimia versus anorexia.
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MKR
Makes me wonder, too.

At first diagnosis, we were told that not all AN kids will develop bulimia. They said something along the lines of, A child is prone or not. Others are too traumatised by the experience of vomitting to do it "deliberately". Now it looks like there is more to it...
Mum's Kitchen

14-y-o "healthy living" led to AN in 2017 and WR at 16. Current muscle dysmorphia.
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Enn
I took this post to mean that ED do not necessarily occur alone that there may another mental health issue associated with the ED.
https://www.eatingdisorderhope.com/treatment-for-eating-disorders/co-occurring-dual-diagnosis
When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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LaraB
Oh my goodness, I find this slide confusing too - perhaps because I read too quickly and initially I also thought they were saying that a very high number had both AN and another ED which seemed very odd.  Now I see it is about other mental health issues. Thanks@Enn for clarifying.
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Scaredmom2019
Yes, I was wondering why bulimia has higher rates of other mental illness than anorexia does. I just wonder why that is. 
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Enn
@Scaredmom2019 
I don’t know why certain other psychiatric diagnoses as associated with bulimia and it is a very interesting association. You have piqued my interest and so I dug around a bit. I do t think this answers the question at all, but it shows what types of other co-occurring illnesses are associated with  bulimia .

Very interesting:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034764/
When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Foodsupport_AUS
I have been trying to find the source of these stats and have come up blank. NEDA has a large number of statistics on its site - co-existing disorders is further down the page. The figures don't seem to match up with the infographic. Either way eating disorders are frequently accompanied by other mental health diagnoses - which ones, and why the different frequencies is less clear. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Initially weight restored 2012. Relapse and continuously edging towards recovery. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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FEAST
Hello! Below is the reference page for a few of NEDA's stats included the one posted! 

References

1 Mangweth, B., Hudson, J. I., Pope, H. G. Jr., Hausmagn, A., DeCol, C., Laird, N. M., …Tsuang, M.T. (2003). Family study of the aggregation of eating disorders and mood disorders.Psychological Medicine, 33, 1319-1323.
2 McElroy, S. L. O., Kotwal, R., & Keck, P. E. Jr. (2006). Comorbidity of eating disorders with bipolar disorder and treatment implications. Bipolar Disorders, 8, 686-695.
3 Altman, S. E., & Shankman, S. A. (2009). What is the association between obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders? Clinical Psychology Review, 29, 638-646.
4 Grilo, C. M., White, M. A. and Masheb, R. M. (2009), DSM-IV psychiatric disorder comorbidity and its correlates in binge eating disorder. Int. J. Eat. Disord., 42: 228–234. doi:10.1002/eat.20599
5 The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University. Food for Thought: Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) Columbia University; New York: 2003.
6 Hudson JI, Hiripi E, Pope HG Jr, and Kessler RC. (2007). The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Biological Psychiatry, 61(3):348-58.
7 Blinder, B. J., Cumella, E. J., & Sanathara, V. A. (2006). Psychiatric Comorbidities of Female Inpatients With Eating Disorders. Psychosomatic Medicine, 68(3), 454-462. doi:10.1097/01.psy.0000221254.77675.f5
8 "NIH Categorical Spending -NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)." U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 3 Jul. 2017. Web. 11 Jan. 2018.
9 Milos, G., Spindler, A., Buddeberg, C., & Crameri, A. (2003). Axes I and II comorbidity and treatment experiences in eating disorder subjects. Psychother and Psychosom, 72(5), 276-285.
10 Ulfvebrand, S., Birgegard, A., Norring, C., Hogdahl, L., & von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Y. (2015). Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database. Psychiatry Res, 230(2), 294-299. 
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