F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

Welcome to F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum. This is a free service provided for parents of those suffering from eating disorders. It is moderated by kind, experienced, parent caregivers trained to guide you in how to use the forum and how to find resources to help you support your family member. This forum is for parents of patients with all eating disorder diagnoses, all ages, around the world.

Join these conversations already in progress:
• Road To Recovery - Stories of Hope
• Events for Parents and Caregivers Around the World
• Free F.E.A.S.T Conference Videos

Visit the F.E.A.S.T website for information and support.

If you need help using the forum please reach out to one of the moderators (listed below), or email us at bronwen@feast-ed.org.

mamabear Show full post »
toothfairy
http://www.blog.drsarahravin.com/eating-disorders/active-ingredients/?fbclid=IwAR1Ocx4UeMub1VNZpsnDg_8G5daUTmiP1G2H9XQKKu445KlkaXIXbL-bWSc

Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
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mamabear
Bump
Persistent, consistent vigilance!
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toothfairy
Here is another wonderful thread - well worth reading right through.
https://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/how-long-does-it-take-5421788?highlight=how+long+does+take&trail=25
Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
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MarcellaUK
Bumping this up again
Fiona Marcella UK
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toothfairy
Here is another important article
http://www.blog.drsarahravin.com/eating-disorders/after-weight-restoration-the-role-of-insight/?fbclid=IwAR2ecDQUQJpYzPcxb5ixna-8Mxjvj-MCXJ8Lazk-7oT8FTFrPB1Zwp3uk24
Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
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tina72
There was a list from someone here that adds signs for a good weight / WR. I do not find it any more and want to send it to a new parent. Can someone help?
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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debra18
The state not weight video by Janet Treasure states them well.
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tina72
Thanks debra18, that was not what I meant. It was a list with good "symptoms" done by a member I think about.
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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toothfairy
Extract from Dr Muhlheims great book

Stay Committed

Plan to stay committed for as long as this takes. Recovery from an eating disorder does not adhere to any set timeline – it can take not months, but years to fully resolve. The work I’m going to suggest you do to help your teen will be hard and will require focus. Prioritizing the eating disorder may mean putting life on hold for yourself and/or your child. Some parents take time off work or put vacation plans on hold. Some young adults may need to delay going to college.

 

Regardless of the type of treatment your adolescent is receiving, there is room for family caregivers to provide meal support. Given the current trend toward cost reduction by insurance providers, there will rarely be a scenario in which a teen leaves an intensive treatment center and comes home fully "cured." The reality is that any treatment is only the first stop on the road to recovery – full recovery requires time. It requires eating enough food regularly throughout the day, maintaining a healthy weight, and not engaging in dieting, bingeing, purging, or excessive exercise for an extended time period.

 

During this time you may need to supervise all of your teen’s meals in order to help him or her fully recover. You can facilitate this by helping and requiring your teen to practice recovery-consistent behaviors, thus extending the duration of time spent with optimal nutrition, versus allowing him or her to fall under the spell of the eating disorder again. Whichever treatment model is used, FBT principles and training are vitally important for families.

 

There are real costs to not treating this as a priority. As a clinician, I have seen many patients with eating disorders dive into situations they didn’t want to miss but were not stable enough to handle. I have heard heartbreaking stories of teens who engaged in travel, study abroad programs, sports participation, and college all before they were ready. They experienced so much anxiety they could not fully benefit from or enjoy the opportunity they endangered their recovery to attend. The support they required (therapy, help from family, medical appointments) took time away from the very activities they had wanted to enjoy. College students were resentful that they had so many therapy appointments to attend. Others had to come home early. They then blamed themselves when it became too much too handle or their recovery derailed. These patients would have been better off waiting for full health, when they could fully take advantage of the opportunity. 

 

In my experience, families can struggle with placing the appropriate prioritization on recovery. They may have trips planned and other things they want to accomplish. They may fear disappointing their sick adolescent (or a sibling) by canceling an activity. When dealing with these frustrations, it can be helpful to think about other life-altering conditions: if your child had diabetes or cancer, you almost certainly would prioritize your adolescent’s treatment over other family activities. An eating disorder can be just as deadly as these better understood disorders. Your adolescent’s fate is in your hands. You need persistence.
https://www.amazon.com/When-Your-Teen-Eating-Disorder/dp/1684030439

Food is the medicine. Recovery is possible.
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