F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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kayjay
Hi all,

I'm in the UK and have a 16 year old D recently diagnosed with RAN, and am looking for some help and advice regarding schooling.

D sat her GCSEs this summer and is expecting results in a few days. She has finished at her secondary school and holds an offer of a place in the sixth form at a selective grammar school to start A levels in September. This is dependent on GCSE results, but the grades required are way below her predicted grades, and she feels that the exams went fine.

Her AN has been quite rapid onset, she is being seen by CAMHS for home refeeding, her BMI is just over 13.

I am wondering what the process will be if CAMHs feel that she should not be at school in September. Whether the school are likely/allowed to hold her place, bearing in mind she's not yet enrolled etc. I believe that for u16s the LEA have an obligation to provide educational opportunities for children medically unable to attend school but I haven't been able to find any information about those of sixth form age.

She has a CAMHs appointment on Monday and the school are likely to phone on Thursday once the results come out to confirm her place. My view is that her health comes first, absolutely, and if she has to start her a levels a year later then so be it. She is devastated at the thought of not starting back at school, says she'll go mad at home for a year.

I guess I'm just looking for some thoughts and experiences of others who are more experienced and knowledgeable, so that I can prepare myself and my daughter for the next few days X
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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NellyMac_UK
Our D also developed RAN around this time, unfortunately she was too ill to continue in sixth form and is now doing an apprenticeship.  We took her out to refeed at home, she just wasn't well enough for school and was unable to focus or study. She was also suffering very badly from anxiety at the time.

The school were very helpful - they were very accommodating to her needs and even offered that she could do just one A level during the first year and attend part time (which would have meant staying in sixth form for three years).  High schools normally have a lot of experience dealing with a wide range of problems, I'm sure they will be helpful to you.

However, I would strongly advise feeding yourself as she will probably need to be supervised to make sure she eats, also we had to prevent our D going to the bathroom for an hour after each meal to prevent purging - this all takes a lot of time!

I really wish our D had been able to stay on - she is now very isolated. 

It really depends how ill your D is and whether she can recover whilst attending.  Its a horrible, heart breaking decision to have to make my thoughts are with you xx
Diagnosed RAN October 2013, w/r but struggling with depression and anxiety.
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OneToughMomma
Dear kayjay,

I won't comment on the systems as I am in Australia, but I want you to know that a gap year was the best thing that we could have done for my d. It wasn't always pleasant, but she really needed that time to solidify her recovery. She worked and saved a bit, finished her treatment and spent time with friends.

She now says it was absolutely the right thing to do.

OTM
D in and out of EDNOS since age 8. dx RAN 2013. WR Aug '14. Graduated FBT June 2015 at 18 yrs old. [thumb]
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Torie
kayjay wrote:
she is being seen by CAMHS for home refeeding, her BMI is just over 13.


As I'm across the pond from you, I don't know how your education system operates. But since her BMI is just over 13, I can tell you that your d will need LOTS of support this year.  It will be tough, tough sledding to get your d to a proper weight - sorry to be blunt - and she will need all meals and snacks supervised for quite some time. 

This will obviously be really hard for your d - the eating is hard enough and also making educational adjustments/delays adds to the difficulty. It's good you are getting this sorted out so that you can set a good example for her by prioritizing health over everything - including education. She needs to see that you are OK with whatever is needed ... as long as the nutrition goes in.

Sorry, I know that doesn't answer your question, and isn't what you want to hear, to boot. 

I hate this vile illness, but it *does* get better. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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kayjay
Thanks for your thoughts and experiences.

One of the main reasons that D and I are concerned about schooling is her increasing isolation. We moved area earlier in the year, and the combination of distance and ED has seen her school friends gradually back off, although D has tried to stay in touch and arrange to go meet them. This will worsen once they start their new school and colleges. D had pinned her hopes on getting to know new people at her new school. The social side of her sports has petered out while she's not allowed to train.

I guess I need to know, her new school has offered her a place dependent on her achieving set grades in her GCSEs - if she meets or exceeds those grades are they then committed to giving her the place? I'm going to need to ask to either defer her place for a year or put her on a vastly reduced timetable for a year so she'd be with them an extra year. They are an oversubscribed selective/prestigious school, will they just take the next name at the top of the list and walk away from her? In the uk now, students who are year 12-13 age are legally bound to be in some form of education.

Refeeding is hard. She appears to want to eat to get well, especially with the carrot of school. But her stomach seems so small and processes food so slowly that she's always full to the point of feeling sick, and is constantly nauseous which makes her low and miserable - and we're only on week 2. The list of restricted food makes it hard to get in the calories that zCAMHS want with a small enough footprint that she can manage. I'm getting 700 calories in at breakfast, porridge made with milk, complan powder added, some nuts or dried fruit to flavour it and a glass of juice. She just about manages this, has to really push the last 1/4 of the bowl. Lunchtime is complan made with milk, it has more calories in less volume than the prescribed ensure and she finds the taste less cloying - so 1050 cals. Dinner varies, but I'm just about getting 1600 cals in, CAMHS want her to have 1900 this week and will probably bump that up at her appointment today. She has no milkshakes (too thick/rich), nothing chocolate, nothing pudding or cake related, nothing fried or greasy, nothing rich or creamy. She's veggie but will eat eggs cheese and nuts. I made nut muffins at the weekend. She forced one down but very miserable and stroppy 'you know I don't do cake' only eating it because I had got up early to make them. Rest of family getting fat lol. IP has been mentioned by CAMHS if she can't gain weight at home.
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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ooKoo
Hi Kayjay,

Sadly, isolation is very common with our ED children.  We didn't move and we live very centrally in the town where we have lived for all of my D's life and still the friends all dropped away.  My D is 17, so a school year ahead of your D and is now more social with new friends of her own choosing now that her brain is healing.

As far as college is concerned, I would recommend being very upfront and honest with the college.  They may ask her to enrol, and then keep her place open for a certain period of time after that.  There is a fair amount of course hopping with A Levels for the first half term or so, which may give you some leeway.  A levels have been a shock for some of the kids in my Ds cohort, there is a lot of pressure, and I would imagine that this will be the case at the college your D will be going to.

My D was at a BMI of 17, so much much higher than your D.  My D also had very rapid onset  She was diagnosed in Feb last year, and she had been doing well, and had got her life back on track, so she started 6th form college in September (I would guess her BMI was about 20 at this point).  It all went well-ish for a couple of months, but it soon became apparent that she was not ready and she had a huge relapse in Jan this year.  We pulled her out of college and told them that she would not be returning.  The college was great and they held her place for her, just in case - until it got to the point where she wouldn't be able to catch up.  So, my D has had since Jan off college, and has done a little part time work, so occupy her, which has been really useful for her - life skills plus the added benefit of spending money.  She starts Yr 1 again at a different college, so yes, in theory she has wasted a year, but oh boy, it will be a year well spent if it has helped her to recover! 

It was a very hard decision to pull my D out of college, and if you had asked me 2 years ago how I would feel about my D dropping out of college and giving up on her lifetime career dream,  I would have been absolutely devestated.  But actually, I am now more relaxed, because I know she will beat this ED and she will be stronger because of it.  She will achieve whatever it is that she wants to do.  After fighting ED everything else will feel like a walk in the park!

As you know, your Ds BMI is very low indeed, and however quick the onset of ED was, the only two things that will get her BMI up to a safe level are food and time.  Your D may find it easier to recover without the pressure of having to be ready for a certain timeframe.  If your D doesn't go to college this year, when it comes to reapplying for college for Sept 2017 - your D will get her place straight away as she will already have her GCSE results - so it would be firm offer, rather than a conditional offer. 

Good luck with the GCSE results on Thursday, I remember feeling very nervous this time last year!

Kx
UK - South East

19 yo D

Dx AN Feb 2015 (Aged 15). Pre-existing low self-esteen and high anxiety. 

2015: 3 x medical hospital admissions. 1 month in IP which she self discharged from [eek].
2016: 3 x hospital admissions. 
2017: CAMHS CBT. WR, dropped out of 2 different colleges and started an apprenticeship.  Started having grand mal seizures and was diagnosed with epilepsy in Nov 2017. Sacked from job because of this.  Tribunal ensued.
2018 - doing a Psychology degree through Open University and working in retail to pay her way in life. Relapses with eating disorder in June 18 and Nov 18 😢. 

On particularly rough days when I am sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good. [Author Unknown]
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kayjay
Hi all,

Thanks for your replies. I'm all for trying to defer her grammar school place for a year - if they will hold the place we can see how things go, and if a more relaxed environment might suit her better she can see how she feels closer to that time. She's devastated at the thought of a year off, I'm telling her that her health is the number one priority.

I feel at the moment it's all a bit academic as she lost 150g at her CAMHS appointment yesterday, so as yet hasn't put anything on. It's a real struggle to get the calories into her, her average last week was 1400/day but lots of nausea and abdominal pain. Her CAMHS worker was talking about a consultant appointment early next week (cons on holiday this week) and the possibility of IP treatment. She was talking about a timescale of 6-12 months as an inpatient and that there is no adolescent ED unit in the county so she could be a distance from home. I don't know if this is a realistic timescale or a scare tactic - I had in my head that IP treatment would be shorter.

I've managed to coax in about 1850 calories yesterday and today, she's been in tears much of today with stomach pains - one of her sports was a combat sport so she's not a delicate flower. Trying hot water bottle and distraction, I think I'd handle things better if she was loud and confrontational, in pain and tearful is tough :-( I'm at the point of wondering if I need to take her to have her stomach checked, or if this is an emotional/ED response to the increase in calories. I'm also a bit concerned that she didn't have her BP checked at the CAMHS appointment, so it hasn't been done in over a week.

Xxx
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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OneToughMomma
Dear kayjay,

Unfortunately, abdominal pain is one of the emotional/physical side effects of nutritional rehabilitation. Those tummies are just not used to having food in them!

My d suffered for months, obviously with symptoms lessening over time. We just had to push through. We found an absolute minimum for weight gain was 2500, but some kids in recovery have needed so much more.

And, yes, I would insist that her bp be checked regularly. It's a good indicator of her health.

You're doing great. Just keep going.

xoOTM
D in and out of EDNOS since age 8. dx RAN 2013. WR Aug '14. Graduated FBT June 2015 at 18 yrs old. [thumb]
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Foodsupport_AUS
I agree with OTM, it is much more likely that her abdominal pain is likely to be due to trying to deal with eating than there being something wrong with D. Functional gut pain, cramping and bloating are really common, as their poor gut has not had to work for a while. There is also evidence that their gut bacteria are out of balance. I would also add that my D who previously was not a delicate flower when it came to pain became one when ill with ED with respect to this sort of thing. Keep on pushing that food in as much as you can. I am sure you know she needs more than she has been getting but boy it is so tough to get it in? Liquid calories/smoothies can be easier. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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Torie
I agree with OTM and FS. 

Frankly, it would be really odd if she DIDN'T complain of nausea and stomach pain. Some have reported that heated blankets help, or weighted blankets, hot water bottles, but mostly, I think, distraction. I'm sure you already know this, but it helps to have something planned to commence immediately after they finish the meal ... movie, board game, craft, etc.

Sucks so much for them ... and for us.

Keep swimming. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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Torie
Forgot to add ... but it DOES get better.

Sucks that the only way out is through. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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Blommie
Hi I was so worried about my d and her stomach pain that I nearly took her to a&e a few times- it took a long time for the pain to settle. It is quite normal I am afraid but it does get better. Keep trying to increase those calories as my d needed 3000-4000 at one point to gain a tiny amount!! You are doing very well!!
About her bp- call your gp this morning, ask for an emergency app and get them to check her. Then whilst you are there you can book an app for the same next week. We had the practice nurse do an ecg and the other checks weekly for a long time and they are happy to do this. Xxx
D officially diagnosed April 2014 at age 13 after being hospitalised on a medical ward due to severe restriction. Been refeeding at home, doing FBT through CAMHS. Living life moment by moment
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kayjay
Thank you all X

GCSE results day, and a decision on schooling, she decided that she definitely wants to go to the grammar school but wants to take a year out to focus on her health first.

I spoke to the school, they were great. Said the UCAS system doesn''t allow for deferred 6th form places, but that they will hold a place for her next year - she will have to apply through UCAS but it will be a formality, she'll get an unconditional offer. They suggested that doing some maths study during the year off will be helpful to her, and offered to send her a textbook and learning materials to self study GCSE additional maths - she's done math and further maths already. They said if she wants to take the exam in this next summer she can sit it with them, but that there would be no obligation or pressure to do so. I also pointed out that if they will take her in a year other places would too, and that there's nothing to stop her looking round to see what feels right to her at that time.

She's come out of today feeling that she's valued by the school, and that although her plan for the coming year isn't what she thought her life would be, at least she has a plan. And if IP is recommended, she hasn't got the added complication of school to worry about. And she's eating better today too which is always a bonus :-)
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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OneToughMomma
Good news!

You're doing great!

xoOTM
D in and out of EDNOS since age 8. dx RAN 2013. WR Aug '14. Graduated FBT June 2015 at 18 yrs old. [thumb]
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kayjay
We've had her first gain this week :-D

1.2 kg on after two weeks of staying the same or losing a few grammes. Takes her BMI up to 13.45. She is... ambivalent about the gain, comments that she feels like she is just staying home and getting fat while everyone else has a life. I reinforced the positives, she gets to stay at home rather than IP, she's getting healthier not fat, the dizzy spells have all but gone and hurt feet are less blue, they haven't increased her calories as we thought they might, and every gain is a step closer to being able to go back to doing some of the things she wants to do. The consultant has said I can ask the GP to prescribe an antiemetic - they'd previously said no due to her low weight.

Sorry to be boring and I know we have a long journey in front of us, but I suspect that if she'd not gained this week we would have had a consultant appointment to discuss options. It's hard going and a very good job I work from home already, I really don't know how people manage this with lwork too X
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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OneToughMomma
What wonderful progress!  We are so happy to hear it.

xoOTM
D in and out of EDNOS since age 8. dx RAN 2013. WR Aug '14. Graduated FBT June 2015 at 18 yrs old. [thumb]
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Torie
kayjay wrote:
We've had her first gain this week


Hooray for the weight gain!!!

kayjay wrote:
I reinforced the positives, she gets to stay at home rather than IP,


Good

kayjay wrote:
she's getting healthier not fat,


Er, maybe a different choice of words next time? When we say "healthy," their disordered brains hear "fat," and the word fat ... well, I think that's a good one to avoid.

kayjay wrote:
the dizzy spells have all but gone and hurt feet are less blue,


Yay!

kayjay wrote:
they haven't increased her calories as we thought they might, 


Hmmm ... not sure about encouraging her to see that as a positive

kayjay wrote:
and every gain is a step closer to being able to go back to doing some of the things she wants to do.


I found it useful to borrow a page from PsychoMom and make liberal use of the word normal. Most AN sufferers don't relish being "healthy" but they do want to be "normal." It's a fabulous word.

kayjay wrote:
Sorry to be boring


Not boring at all! 

I'm sorry for all the negative comments I'm making in my reply - I join you in rejoicing the gain and send strong wishes for a repeat next time.

All the best, xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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kayjay
Thanks for the replies :-)

I'm as sure as I can be that she's not water loading, she has tried that in the past but realised it just adds stress to the next weigh in. She did get weighed later in the day than last week, but the 200ml complan drink would only account for a small part of 1.2kg

I used the word 'healthy' as she tends to talk about 'when I get better' or 'when I get healthy again', but thanks Torie - thinking about it, it could be one of those terms that are fine for her to use but I might be better to avoid...

She's seeing the not bumping up of calories as a bit of a reprieve as they've put it up by 500 cals/day on the last two visits, she knows that it's likely to keep going up but the stomach pains have been nasty so she's glad to not have to face another increase this week. She's gone from (unbeknown to us) one meal a day 4 weeks ago to 2000 cals/day. It's hard to get this amount in, with the combination of her small stomach capacity, slow digestion, and the limited range of foods that she will accept. My thought is to first of all just get her used to eating, get some weight on her, then try to widen the foods that I put into her diet once her bmi is up a bit. I've no idea if this is the right thing to do, I'm being given absolutely no nutritional advice other than a calorie target. Getting any food into her is a battle some days X

I just got a new kindle and read brave girl eating last night, starting on Lock and Le Grange tonight. CAMHS were great in terms of a fast diagnosis when I contacted them but there seems to be no help other than a weekly weigh in. It doesn't make a lot of sense when they went to great pains to tell me to restrict her activity due to the health risks of such a low BMI, that they are not monitoring anything other than her weight for three weeks now. I'm guessing that they're restricted by workload and budget, and it would appear that while her situation isn't worsening we're pretty much on our own, so I'd best get reading.
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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Torie
Hi again - I think part of my message wasn't very clear so I'm going to try again.

This is like a high stakes boxing match with you in one corner of the ring and an evil mad scientist that has hijacked your d's brain in the other. The prize is your d's life, and by golly I know you would hate to lose. (And the evil mad scientist in the far corner of the ring that wants to starve your d to death would also hate to lose.)

We are here to cheer you on and applaud when you land a punch, and what we FEASTIES love more than about anything is hearing that someone's treatment team is upping the calories at a good clip. 2000 calories is barely a maintenance diet (if even that) - not nearly enough for recovery.  

Every week she is underfed adds (at least) one additional week to her recovery. Do you hear the cheering from the other corner of the ring? It sends a mixed message when you tell your d it's good news that they didn't increase the meal plan this week. That is good news for the AN so it can't be good news for you and your d.

The only way out is through, and the only way through is with more calories. LOTS more. I'm not gonna lie ... it will be awful. (Forgive the understatement.) So the best we can hope for is that you get through the worst of it as quickly as possible. 

I'm sorry. I can tell you're a really nice person, and I just want to wrap you up in a warm blanket and give you a hug instead of all this tough talk. 

Please remember that we're with you in spirit. And we're a force to be reckoned with. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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kayjay
Thank you x I know she needs to eat more, I'm just not sure at this point how to get it into her, and while I'm impressed with how fast she was seen and diagnosed, I'm coming to see that a weekly weigh and 'how have things been this week' is not nearly enough help for me to get my D through this. I feel that physically she'd be in far worse shape had she not been so athletic before the onset of AN. She reports feeling fine, and frustrated with being restricted from doing more physically when she feels perfectly able. So I put another movie on, or Jeremy Kyle, or get out the nail polish or whatever.

Pre diagnosis, D tells me (now!) that she was having a glass of water at breakfast time whilst smearing a bowl with yogurt to put in the sink, telling me that breakfast had been yogurt with fruit and granola, toast and juice. Lunch was binned. Dinner was whatever the family was eating, usually a smaller portion and often not finished. Drinks in the evening were poured down the sink. Snacks on the way home from training were nibbled, hidden, then binned. In the 12 week period leading up to and including the GCSE exams she lost 10kg, lying about her weight as we got more worried.

At the moment I'm making her porridge for breakfast, with the addition of complan to bump up the nutrition, adding some nuts or dried fruit, and a glass of juice, which comes out at 700 calories. She struggles to finish this but does it 19 times out of 20. She feels nauseous and overfull, and tends to still feel this way by lunchtime. At lunchtime she had complan made up with milk. She finds it far more palatable than ensure, and when its made up with milk it has more calories in a lower volume. I've added a small snack to this as I want to get her eating food more regularly, as I know her calories will need to increase. At the moment this is a cereal bar or a couple of ginger biscuits or some nuts, so about 500 cals at lunchtime. Evening meal will be something like pasta with pesto, vegetables and cheese, or home made nut roast, or vegetable curry with coconut rice, in any case about 700 cals with a glass of fruit juice added to that to get to 2000 in total. She will sometimes have a drink later in the evening but rarely.

She has stomach pain and nausea pretty much all the time. I believe her when she says that she does, and that this is normal and to be expected in her situation. I also believe that her anxiety around food and eating magnifies it, and I do think that her ED plays on it as a way to avoid or minimise eating.

I know that the only way to increase her calorie intake is going to be to increase the number of times a day she eats - she's already gone from one small meal and a glass of water a day to two far more substantial meals and a supplement/snack in 3-4 weeks but more needs to be done. They're now allowing her an antiemetic so when this starts I'm going to add in 'supper' - even if this is just a warm milky drink and a biscuit to start with.

The list of foods she restricts is long. No sweets or chocolate or anything containing chocolate or chocolate flavoured. No cake, ice cream or pudding type items - with the exception of yogurt. Muffins are classed as cake. No fried or greasy food. No rich or creamy textured food. She doesn't eat snack type food like crisps or biscuits with the exception of ginger biscuits (helps a bit with the nausea). No milkshakes or smoothies although she will drink complan or ovaltine because they're not thick. She became vegetarian but that actually expanded her range of foods - she was only really eating chicken, but will now eat eggs, a wider range of cheeses, a wider range of grains and pulses, things like falafel and houmous and avocado and tofu and tahini that she wouldn't eat before. These are all useful calorific ingredients so I don't see the vegetarianism as worsening the issue. What I do see is that most of the foods that have been found to be useful to other families refeeding their child are firmly 'no'. I'm using nuts a lot, and cooking with coconut milk a lot!

I really don't know what I would do without this forum X
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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Torie
Thank you for detailing what she is eating. That will help us give you some ideas.

I know how weird this sounds, but others have reported that they can add a tablespoon of rapeseed oil (UK) or canola oil (US) to juice without the flavor or texture being affected - I was amazed that this was true of the other things I put it in (soups, etc.). Especially if you start small with just 1/2 teaspoon or so and MIX THOROUGHLY it should be fine. And if you add a bit of ginger and toss the lot in the blender, I'm sure you could start with at least 1/2 tablespoon. (You could blame any complaints on too much ginger.)

Grind nuts to a powder, and you can add lots more of them.

Allow extra time at the grocery store to read labels. Full fat yogurt is MUCH better than low fat, but can be hard to find. Some here have reported finding bread that packs a punch even with a small slice. When you can get her to eat ice cream again, be sure to get one of the premium brands because they have many more calories.

If she will eat grilled cheese, butter both sides of the bread. And of course use the highest cal bread and cheese you can find.

You know she will have to start eating chicken again, right? And when did she stop eating beef and pork?

I know others will be here with suggestions.

You're making good progress. Keep swimming. xx

-Torie


"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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kayjay
Thanks - some great ideas. I'm just pondering on oil in the porridge. She's not eating much bread but scrambled egg on toast works well for breakfast. With butter and cheese :-) I was just contemplating whether I could put ground nuts in pastry to make quiche...

She's never been much of a meat eater apart from chicken really- even going out for meals when she was a young child she'd often opt for the vegetarian option (and she was not at all skinny as a young child) so I always expected that she'd be veggie at some point. I know that becoming vegetarian or vegan as an ED takes hold is very common though.

In your experience, does it sound reasonable to hold off on tackling some of her 'excluded' foods until I get some weight on her? She's 1.68m and 38kg at present, my thought is that the number one priority is to get her weight up and get her back into the habit of eating. My planned next steps are to try to get more food in at lunchtime and add something at suppertime - even if this is just a warm milky drink to start with, as this will give me more scope to increase her calories.

D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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catbells
Try some single cream as well as butter in the scrambled egg - delicious and extra cals too.

Mum to 17y/o D living in England. RAN since Sept 2015. Refed at home but after getting within 3kg of WR D relapsed July 2016. hospital twice and then IP  Sept 2016 - Jan 2018. Now continuing the battle at home...
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Torie
kayjay wrote:
In your experience, does it sound reasonable to hold off on tackling some of her 'excluded' foods until I get some weight on her?


You'll find a variety of answers to this one. Many here hold off on tackling some of the fear foods, while others go all in and all out and require everything to be eaten from the get-go. There's no single correct answer on that.

My personal view was that the only thing that really mattered was weight gain. Whatever I thought would result in the biggest uptick was what I did.

You will be amazed how much you will learn/figure out to help with this. It's a steep learning curve, and as you're seeing, it turns everything we have ever believed about parenting on its head.

There was something else I wanted to say, but I can't think of it now. Oh well, there's always next time.

Keep swimming. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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kayjay
Today's weigh in showed a 0.6 kg gain - so her BMI is up to almost 13.7. She's not being seen next week, so two weeks til next check, and I'm told to keep her calories at 2000 as she's gaining weight on that amount. I think I'm going to quietly increase it though.

A quick question if anyone can help. She was given cyclizine to help with the nausea. Since she started the cyclizine a couple of days ago the nausea has greatly improved but she's cried through every meal and quite a while afterwards, saying her stomach pain has greatly increased and maybe she was focussing on the nausea so much that she didn't realise how bad the pain was. I cant find much online about cyclizine causing stomach pain Part of me is thinking that her ED is looking for a different tactic now that it doesnt have nausea to use as a reason to avoid food. Am I being too suspicious?
D, 16, diagnosed with AN Aug 2016. One day at a time...
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