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tara21

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Reply with quote  #26 
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Originally Posted by EC_Mom
Freedomfighter, I remember so well the months of heart-thumping. It was really awful. But you are doing so much the right thing with all that feeding!

I know people have different "discipline" styles around the out-of-control behavior with ED. My own view was that the ED did those awful things, not my d, so once eating happened there was no punishment or 'consequences'. And after an awful, mean episode I made sure to connect lovingly with my d to communicate with her that I was on her side, not mad, etc. Whatever works for your family, though, is what you should be doing.

It sounds like your steely resolve is really working, cheering you on here!
tara21

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Reply with quote  #27 
I was just trying to figure this out this morning--the therapist says that the rages are the ED, not my daughter. True enough, inbetween rages (ie in those few brief moments inbetween meals and snacks), she is as sweet and loving and fabulous as ever. Soooo--should there be consequences for her rages (as there would have been when she was a toddler) or since the rage is the ED, not her, should we be done with it once it's done and just move on with our day?


Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #28 
I definitely had a greater tolerance for ED rages than I would have for other bad behaviour. Like many kids who develop AN my D had very few moments of anger growing up and was certainly never naughty. So this was a whole new ball game. Mostly D would apologise when things had calmed down and I accepted that apology in general without their being other consequences, however a few parents have had marked violence and have had to call the police. Even though we separate the ED from our child, it is still our child behaving in this way. We don't hold psychiatrically crazed criminals with the same level of responsibility however we still insist that the community is kept safe from them. In the same way it is important when things have calmed we need to have our children understand that their behaviour in the moment was unacceptable and that we expect them to try to control their violent outbursts. That may mean that their needs to be consequences for particularly difficult outbursts but we must also at the same time be aware that they are struggling and have much more wild swings of emotions and behaviours than they would normally. 
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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
LauraCollins_US

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Reply with quote  #29 
The discipline thing is hard! I think it helps to think back on our toddlers having a meltdown in a supermarket aisle. We take stock of the situation and change our own expectations and behavior: we don't bring them to the store when they're tired, we might leave them with another adult until they are old enough to handle the stimuli, and we would cancel plans for the rest of the day to regroup. We'd recognize they lost control, and that was an indication we'd underestimated their ability.

With a meltdown like you describe, you could see it as information that they are too fragile right now for any stress, sympathize with how awful they felt, and temporarily change expectations.

Consequences rather than punishments. And acknowledgement that no one WANTS to lose control, so you can be sympathetic without being pushed around.

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EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #30 
To be clear, I also had contacted the mental health liaison for our local police, to find out what would happen if I called 911, and to let our beat cop know what our story was. But for mostly-nonviolent rages (smashed drinking glass, for instance), I tried to stay calm, keep feeding, and soon after it was over to go back and reestablish connection. My d always seemed grateful and needy when I did that. There were also punches and kicks sent my way, which is when I said, "I'll be calling 911 in a moment, I'm not feeling safe with you." And the 911 thing really calmed her down, because she knew I had talked to the cops.

As she got better she actually would be shocked at herself. She once hit me and then burst into tears and said, "I didn't mean to do that, I don't know why that happened." I believed her. It really was not her usual MO at all. 

Frankly it was much easier when she had rages than when she, later on, moved into a stage of berating herself cruelly, including head-banging. 

In any case, keep feeding. Knock on wood, we are way past all this and she is a mostly normal teen. You can do this.
freedomfighter

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Reply with quote  #31 
day 16. I asked advice a while back about a birthday out to a concert with a friend in London. In the end prepared a lovely pack tea for them.  D's friend is in on what is going on and (with her mum) is very supportive.  They set off and had a great adventure in the snow and arrived back  in the early hours.  Friend reported (as arranged) that pack tea was eaten so I have to be satisfied with that. Proposed college trip to Westminster today was cancelled due to weather so that solved that problem.

But 17th birthday today, and a new low. Laid out a lovely birthday breakfast for D and friend (who stayed the night) and left them to it. (I know she had chocolate croissant and fruit).  Having friend here was nice and normalising, and I let them sleep in.

Friend then went home and I made D her a late lunch, she was dismayed and furious and frightened,  and it felt awful awful awful doing this to her on her birthday. (I had asked, a number of times over the past weeks, what she would like to eat for her birthday, but she wouldn't say...) Lots of violence such as we haven't had since week 1, poured water all over our bed after, threw chair across the room, broke plate, etc.  It is the one meal that she got away with not having everything, because everything went on the floor and had to be re-made so I took a few short-cuts.  In the end the way she ate it, sobbing, on the floor, stuffing it into her mouth, gagging, it felt like force-feeding, terrible terrible terrible. 

Had a camhs appointment a few days back which was less helpful then it could have been.  I had asked them to clearly support us, in front of D, in the re-feeding.  Said this would be so helpful to D.  But they didn't.  They supported us implicitly, with lots of wafting around.  Instead of consistent simple message going out it was all therapy speak and it didn't make sense to us at this stage of the proceedings.  We all left the meeting (D, H & me) feeling upset and insecure, all in our different ways.

Filled with self-doubt right now.  Will our relationship ever recover? She wants to do NOTHING with us, no matter what, not even be in the same room as us.  Long to take her to see a movie, celebrate her, hug her, comfort her, reassure her.  My heart feels like it's bleeding.  Lord have mercy.  That's what I say to myself, all day, these days.
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #32 
So sorry to hear this. Birthdays and holidays are hard with ED. Would it help to think, "If this is the worst birthday she ever has, that is ok--because it means the rest will be better, in part thanks to healing from ED"?

It is so hard--but not atypical for refeeding phases, unfortunately. Most of us here have found that the relationships DO improve, and I can report that my d and I are now extremely close. 

Also unfortunate that the team did not support you explicitly. Can you debrief with them and express disappointment? Next time can you give them a scripted set of responses you want from them? 
tina72

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Reply with quote  #33 
Hi freedomfighter,
try to look for what has worked good this week. The day trip to the concert was super! You prepared it, she ate everything, the friend helped, that is great. ED:0 freedomfighter:1

So sorry for that bad birthday, I know what you feel and how it went.
My d was 17 a few days before she went into IP last year. She didn´t want to celebrate. She didn´t want to invite somebody because she was so afraid of the cake. In the end she baked muffins without fat and sugar for us and we ate one although they didn´t taste at all. She ate none. She was crying the whole day.
In the afternoon a friend came over although not invited. She gave him a muffin and he said he will only eat one if she joins him. She ate one then. After they have finished he said: "That was the most terrible muffin I ever ate. I know you are able to bake better ones. The next time I want to have one that tastes sweet." I could have hugged him.

This year she had a normal birthday again. We had cake (in fact a heavy buttercreme) and she went out to a restaurant with her friends in the evening. It was a really nice day. As EC_mom said: it might have been the worst birthday ever. But that means the next one will be better. I am sure for that.
Your relationship will recover. Be sure for that. She cannot think normal at the moment. She is not behaving like your d would. You only react to ED and not to your beloved d. I know it feels terrible.

Your d wants to do something with you. She loves you. ED hates you. ED wants not to be in the same room with you because you are his enemy. Try to offer her distraction and just be there. Even when she seem not to want it. Inside she is crying for you. If you try to stay nice and compassionate and offer her your presence although she is saying bad words to you or throwing the chairs, you will drive ED crazy. Think about that...

My d now often says: I am so grateful that you never let me down. Without your help I would not have survived that. She is still fighting and suffering, but we are now a team and she knows that we help her and she comes to us if she is afraid of some food or if she has problems to chose a snack because she knows we will help her.
My d often didn´t want to be touched or hugged while she had an outburst. Try it an hour later when she has calmed down a bit. And use good days (yes, they will come!) to have some body contact to renew your relationship.
Another idea is to use the early morning. As others here I experienced that ED is still sleeping then. ED has the most power in the evenings. So I woke up my d in the morning and gave her some foot massage or just stroke her. Then she would let me do that. And I think she liked it.

Sorry that your camhs team didn´t support you as you wanted. I would make an appointment alone without d and try to tell them why this is so important for you and that ypu need that now and no therapy speek because it is senseless at that state. Can you change the team if necessary? Bad help is worser than no help.
Go on. Keep swimming. I know that you think you cannot do that but you can. In a few weeks you will see what you have achieved. It is a long dark tunnel. You have to go through it to see the light. Just keep going. It will get better.
Tina72

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Reply with quote  #34 
Great job on the concert trip. 

To be honest the birthday part was predictable. My D had two birthday's in hospital and it was around five years before she could actually start to "celebrate" her birthday with food. Food is such a stressor for them in recovery that it is impossible for them to celebrate with it. I actually found it worked better if food on birthdays was just the same as any other day. No greater or lesser expectation that she ate. That was hard enough for her. I would offer her a choice of several meals but we did not offer going out to a restaurant - a family tradition - because for her it was really increasing her anxiety on her birthday. I left those challenges for non birthdays. We are now eight years in. Still some way to go here to full recovery but heading in the right direction. Food is again something she can do with friends and can be used as part of a celebration. 

Yes your D will love you and want to be with you again. This cold shouldering is common and to be expected at this point. After all you are a huge source of distress to her, making her eat all that food, forcing her to gain weight. ED cannot see anything else. You may like to look up Colleen's posts on emotional anorexia. Her daughter refused to talk or be near her for several years. Colleen has recently posted on the FB page about how well things are going now. 

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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #35 
Oh my...I can empathize with the 17th birthday being a challenge!  Our d claimed it was 'the worst birthday ever' and it truly wasn't a happy occasion.  However, I'm happy to report that as D reached WR in the next few months, life did turn around.

Hang on; life will get better, and your d will return to her loving self, and your relationship can be even stronger.  Ours definitely is...but I had to be prepared to fight the ED battle and suffer the short-term grief of d name-calling and generally being a pill for quite some time.

Sending you strength & support,
sk8r31

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tina72

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Reply with quote  #36 
Hi freedomfighter,
as Foodsupport_AUS said, asking her what she want to eat for birthday, easter, christmas ... is no good idea at the moment. She cannot tell you what she really want to eat and you will only hear what ED likes to eat.
It is really the best to have all days nearly the same (not the same food, but same procedure). No big changes, same times, same place. ED patients are often rule-bounded characters and you can use that. If you introduce a new rule and keep it for some days it will get normal.
We had a similar problem with weekends and holidays. It wasn´t possible to let her sleep long because then we wouldn´t get the 3 meals 2 snacks in (we never had 3 snacks). It was hard to wake her up at 8 a.m. even in holidays but so she had a goal to work for: WR was the goal to be allowed to sleep longer.
Family feasts like christmas or easter are a problem, too. Big meals, many people around, everybody watching her eat (in her eyes). So we cancelled that, too and did it in the inner circle of our family at home. Exeptions from the daily procedure are difficult for a long time. But even that will get better!
Keep posting how you are doing, we are all with you in spirit.
Tina72
Torie

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Reply with quote  #37 
FF: So sorry about the terrible horrible birthday.  Ugh ugh ugh.  It will fade into the past, though, and your d might not remember it at all once she is herself again (although, of course, you will).  It's a safe bet that she is deeply ashamed about her behavior as your real d would never act like that.  Maybe think of it as a demonstration of how desperate ED is feeling?

We had some really awful holidays, too.  Now, I have to turn away so my family doesn't see the tears in my eyes to be back to having normal ones.  I think I will always appreciate "normal" in a way that I would not have without ED. You will get there.  Keep going.  xx

Tina, I love this!  If you ever see this guy again, please give him a hug from me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tina72
In the afternoon a friend came over although not invited. She gave him a muffin and he said he will only eat one if she joins him. She ate one then. After they have finished he said: "That was the most terrible muffin I ever ate. I know you are able to bake better ones. The next time I want to have one that tastes sweet." I could have hugged him.


-Torie

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freedomfighter

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Reply with quote  #38 
Day 21.  Traumatised but we are still hanging in there.

I need some wise advice.  I mentioned last week that we had an upsetting CAMHS appointment, so I had a telephone chat with C, our assigned therapist.

He feels that D is within the 'healthy weight range', and that the feeding intervention is having negative effects on our relationship. He wants to work with us together.  I insisted that D is not at a weight healthy for her and that years of undereating and restricting means that she is unable to feed herself adequately anymore and we need to take over.  I have heard so many times about the 'trigger' weight which needs to be reached before the other effects of AN can be addressed.  C said there is no such trigger weight and that this kind of thinking is unhelpful.

He agreed renourishment is a good idea but that more control needs to be given to D.  She is still at the stage when she feels that eating a perfectly ordinary meal is grossly overeating, so I know there is no way this will work.  C said that it doesn't have to be an either/or approach, both can work together, and that the greatest success comes when black/white rigid thinking isn't employed.

He is a therapist of great experience with ED (I believe).  I asked him what his outcomes were but he replied with another question (fair enough I suppose - these things must be hard to measure).

So...I finished the phone call extremely anxious and feeling quite at sea.  It feels so important to have safe, professional backup for what we are doing, and I know this isn't it.  Our GP knows nothing about FBT/re-feeding/Maudsley etc, and sees CAMHS as the experts.  CAMHS say they use the Maudsley approach but it seems to be a mixture of Maudsley/New Maudsley and therapeutic 'buy-in-required' counselling with young person, with an emphasis on bringing healing to the family unit.  I have NO idea where to turn next.

I know the responses I am likely to get on this forum will be strongly supportive of our re-feeding.  I appreciate this, but also need to be willing to listen to voices which have a different approach, otherwise what we are doing can have a kind of cultic feel, if that makes any sense.   Instinctively the 're-nourishing first' approach is what makes sense to me too.  I am quite sure if we stopped at this point we would slide right back to where we were.  This approach also seems to be very evidence based.  But right now I am in a panic.  I genuinely don't know how long we can sustain the level of resistance with are meeting with our D.  We need some professionals with authority to support what we are doing.  Should we use C (CAMHS therapist) to see D on her own and help her to deal with some of the fear and anxiety she is experiencing? this has been for a long time but especially now the ED has been challenged.  Or should we leave CAMHS and try to find something else (even if we have to sell the car!)

Too many questions I know.  H has been very good in this.  He says: we are the ones who know D best.  We are the experts.  All we are doing to her is requiring her to eat 3 meals a day!

Big thanks for all the support.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #39 
Hi freedomfighter,
just a short answer because I have to plate lunch in half an hour [wink]
I know how you feel about being cultic and not doing the right thing. We were feeling we are the only ones in total Germany doing FBT (I now know we were not) and we took our d home from IP to do FBT against the will and advice of doctors and therapists there. We never regretted that.
Your h is totally right. You know her best. You are the experts. You live with her 24/7. Is she behaving normal? NO. Is she eating normal? NO. So how can she do that on her own? Believe me, there is no trigger weight of XY and then everything changes over night. But there was definitiv a trigger weight range where a lot changed for us.
Yes, refeeding has a negativ effect on your relationship at first. But what is the cause for that? That you are fighting ED. Would he really say you should keep the good relationship although this is feeding ED? Your relationship will totally recover afterwards, believe me.
You know that she cannot control her eating at the moment. Would you ask her to control her chemotherapy if it were cancer? How did he say he wants to give her more control and what should be the consequences if it doesn´t work? Seems for me he thinks the old "ED is about control" stuff. It is not. ED is about a bully in her head who controls her. She is not able to control him without help. If you let her choose now what to eat, you will invite ED to choose what she should eat again...

Can you find a real FBT therapist in your region?
If CAMHS isn´t supporting what you are doing, is it CAMHS in general or only this therapist C and can you change him?
Bad help is worse than no help. It is really not fair that we have to fight ED and the system, the docs, the therapists that often.
Tina72


Torie

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freedomfighter
I know the responses I am likely to get on this forum will be strongly supportive of our re-feeding.  I appreciate this, but also need to be willing to listen to voices which have a different approach, otherwise what we are doing can have a kind of cultic feel, if that makes any sense.  


I remember that feeling, and I bet most here will relate to it, too.

YOU are the one who needs to make the decisions, and everyone else can only give advice.  You take what makes sense to you and ignore the rest, whether the advice comes from here, your paid help or wherever.  Your h is right that you know your d best and love her more than anyone else could.  

So yeah, read around, listen to various points of view, and then decide what seems best.  And yeah, I have to tell you my opinion is most definitely to keep feeding your girl.  It's what saved mine.  xx

-Torie

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EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #41 
FreedomFighter, you are right and they are wrong. It is so hard when you feel you can't trust your own medical team. I'm sorry. But you are doing the right thing and it will be you and your daughter that will enjoy your daughter's health later on.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #42 
"I asked him what his outcomes were but he replied with another question (fair enough I suppose - these things must be hard to measure)."
That was a typical professional reaction here, too.
My hubby asked that in IP and they answered: you really don´t want to know that.
We would not have asked if we did not wanted to know that.
But if they were serious (we asked a nurse later) they had to tell us that 3/4 of the patients come back.
There were 6 girls in IP with my d. 4 of them were back after 3 months. 1 went to another IP. My d was the only one who was not admitted again up to now (14 months later). That about how good FBT is working.
Tina72
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Reply with quote  #43 
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He feels that D is within the 'healthy weight range', and that the feeding intervention is having negative effects on our relationship. He wants to work with us together.  I insisted that D is not at a weight healthy for her


She may be in a healthy weight range but that doesn't mean she is healthy or that she can make choices that are healthy.  You just started refeeding so backing off now is really not a good idea.  You just went through hell (and still are) but it will be even harder if you starting subscribing to what he is telling you, back off and when she slides back to where she was.  You may not be able to get control back and why take that chance?  I would tell him that you need at least three to six months to see whether what you are doing is helping, not 21 days.

Quote:
I have heard so many times about the 'trigger' weight which needs to be reached before the other effects of AN can be addressed.  C said there is no such trigger weight and that this kind of thinking is unhelpful.


This I do agree with C.  At least for my daughter, there was not a trigger weight that helped or that made any difference all of a sudden. It was reaching a state of full nutrition and being forced to maintain that over time (six months to a year to see brain healing). I had my daughter in therapy the whole time of refeeding and the therapist fully supported what I was doing.

Quote:
He agreed renourishment is a good idea but that more control needs to be given to D. 


If you know she is going to fail, why set her up?  He doesn't live with her full-time, doesn't know her like you do and most importantly has no consequences to him when she fails.  If you know she will fail, then don't do it.

Quote:
C said that it doesn't have to be an either/or approach, both can work together, and that the greatest success comes when black/white rigid thinking isn't employed.


He is right but that can only be true when both minds are rigid and stuck in black/white thinking.  Your daughter isn't capable of thinking in anything other than black/white right now.  You can go for gray in any other area other than eating, food, exercise, etc.

He could have 30 years of experience with eating disorders but he isn't the full picture. Having experience doesn't mean good experience or success.  Our kids are such good actors and can make things look really good for professionals but anyone having the issues you are describing right now with eating is just not ready to take on what he is telling you to give her.  It isn't fair on you and especially not on her.  It's like taking your daughter and putting her in the middle of say China and expecting she will be fluent in Chinese and not have any problems when she never been outside of your home country and never heard or see Chinese.  What he is describing is appropriate six months to a year down the road after she is weight recovered and had time for her brain to heal.  It is something to strive for but not appropriate right now.

Yes, it may affect your relationship right now but I can tell you from experience that six to eight months down the line your relationship will be better.  She has no good relationships right now with anyone. She isn't capable of it due to her ED.  You sacrifice the very short-term relationship for the longer term gain.  In the end, it is doubtful whether she will even remember the day to day things that are happening now.  You will get your daughter back but not if you follow this guy's advice now.  All you are getting from him is years of struggling and possible death especially if you know she can't do it right now.
Mamaroo

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Reply with quote  #44 
Hi

Here is a clip of one of my favourite movies: The Matrix and it sums up the experience we had when dealing with so called experts.

 



Freedomfighter, we only got our relationship back with our daughter when she was weight restored. She would walk out of the room when my husband came in, and he wasn't even refeeding her! Now they are as close as before, but this would not have happened if she didn't continue to gain weight. Unfortunately, even though she is weight restored for a year now, at nearly 12y she still can't feed herself. We are trying to give her choice at supper (snack after dinner) and I still need to prompt her to get more and to get something substantial (she likes fruit, but o dear, we ran out of fruit today).

Like Tina, my d never returned to IP, while the other girls went back. The difference? The girls' mums listen to them, they wanted to be vegan/vegetarian, so they allowed it, they wanted to go back to sport, so they allowed it. It is not popular to be the mum who refeeds and restricts exercise and keeps on following them with a plate of food, but that is what is needed.

Sending you plenty of hugs today!!!!!

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D became obsessed with exercise at age 9. Started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. She is back to her old happy self and can eat anything put in front of her. Now working on intuitive eating.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #45 
"C said that it doesn't have to be an either/or approach, both can work together, and that the greatest success comes when black/white rigid thinking isn't employed."

Black and white thinking is not your problem I suggest, but your d´s. In our case my d was born with that and talking to many other parents of AN sufferes I would say this is part of the genetic AN-character. We have to work on that, yes, but that is not the cause for AN, it is just part of her character. 
If your d was 5 years old and playing besides a busy street, would you think it is black and white thinking to ask her to come into the safer garden? Or would you give her control about it to show her you work together? Your d is fighting a severe illness with a high mortality rate. No time for experiments. She is safe as long as you control her intake. If she is well into recovery, you can slowly give her this control back (and slowly means really slow, a lot of us did it too early, me included). She can control all other parts of her life. If she is able to control it, she can even drive a car. But she is NOT able to control her food intake and as long as this is not better, I would not show weakness to ED.
Another example: My FIL is more than 80 years old and needs to take meds for his heart. He forgets that every day because his brain is not working that well any more. My MIL gives him the meds and controls the intake. Do you think she should give him more control back although he is not able to do that? Is that black and white thinking?

So how can giving her more control and asking her to eat work together in his mind? I cannot imagine this. If you give her more control (and I think he doesn´t mean to ask her wether she would like a strawberry or a cherry yoghurt), she will surely eat less because then ED will be in control again, not your d. It takes a lot more time than some weeks to get to a state when they can do this again. We are 14 months in refeeding/recovery and now slowly my d decides and not ED. I see it because she choses not the "low calorie" thing if she has to chose out of 2 or 3. She choses what she likes to eat now.

"All we are doing to her is requiring her to eat 3 meals a day!"
Yes! You are not asking her to do something unnormal. You are just asking her to keep herself alive.
Keep swimming. You are doing the right thing.

Tina72
freedomfighter

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Reply with quote  #46 
Thank you all for your gracious wise responses, as always.

Have just discovered the FB group - I find it much easier to manoeuvre.  Any comments about the difference between this and that?

Exhausted.  Day 24 and D is still being hugely violent and tormented at least every other day (a good day is just rudeness and cursing and being told to f off all the time - in fact that would be a VERY good day). 

But we are still hanging in there.

tina72

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Reply with quote  #47 
Hi freedomfighter,
if you find the FB group more easy to connect, than do it. I think the only difference is that some people are not on FB (me, too) and you will meet different parents there. But I am sure the help you will get is the same.
Keep swimming. It will get better at some point. You need to go through that tunnel to see the light. Think about possibilities to get out of that for 30 min or an hour for both of you. Do you have friends or family who could be with her for some time? A walk in the fresh air sometimes is very helpful.
I think about you nearly every day. I so remember how it felt in these dark days. You think it will never be better again and then there is suddenly a day when you think "oh, we did not have violence yesterday" or "oh, she did not complain about food today".
Yesterday we had "oh, my d is picking some popcorn while watching TV". First time. These little steps are so wonderful. They will come, I am sure.
Tina72
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Reply with quote  #48 
Some parents visit both FB and ATDT. ATDT has the advantage of being easily searchable so you can look up lots of old posts and information. FB is easy to work at in real time, but threads tend to get lost after a bit. 

It is hard to look after yourself in the thick of things. Take care. 

__________________
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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Reply with quote  #49 
I am on the FB group now although that's quite recent. A lot of links to other ED groups/practitioners and news articles etc. get posted there, and new members are sure of a good welcome. I'd say it's more of a place to go when you need a cheer, but if you want detailed practical comments and advice then that seems to come more on this forum. Also, you must be better at navigating FB than I am, because I can't imagine being able to keep track of a long-running post such as this one among the other traffic on my FB page!
__________________
D, b.2002, diagnosed with depression, anxiety and EDNOS Spring/Summer 2016.
Some restricting, some vomiting, some self-harm for good measure.
FBT, CBT, now on 3rd type of anti-d's.
D is "cured" of the ED but still on low dose of anti-d's. Will I ever be cured?

tina72

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Reply with quote  #50 
How are you doing, freedomfighter?
We are thinking at you.
Tina72
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