F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

Welcome to F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum. This is a free service provided for parents of those suffering from eating disorders. It is moderated by kind, experienced, parent caregivers trained to guide you in how to use the forum and how to find resources to help you support your family member. This forum is for parents of patients with all eating disorder diagnoses, all ages, around the world.

Join these conversations already in progress:
• Road To Recovery - Stories of Hope
• Events for Parents and Caregivers Around the World
• Free F.E.A.S.T Conference Videos

Visit the F.E.A.S.T website for information and support.

If you need help using the forum please reach out to one of the moderators (listed below), or email us at bronwen@feast-ed.org.

Need to talk with another parent? F.E.A.S.T. parents offer peer support via:

cm72 Show full post »
mjkz
My daughter explains it to me as she went from being numb and being so interested only in food, avoiding food, avoiding calories, etc. to feeling everything equally.  Every single thing she felt was at the same magnitude because her brain wasn't used to prioritizing what things she should be paying attention to and minimizing all the distractions.  Everything I say to her feels like I'm criticizing her and she already feels crappy so whatever I say just adds to it.  I will say that historically as her brain healed, she started to find the shades of gray rather than everything being 100% or 0%.  That dripping faucet that drove her nuts a month ago she was able to tune out so it was a true relearning process.

Dealing with my own depression, I know I've gone through periods when I feel so bad all the time that my baseline is overwhelmed-any little thing that happens just pushes me over the edge.  As my depression lessens, I start out at the same level everyone else does.  The little things don't completely push me over the edge because I wasn't already straddling the edge.  Not sure if that makes sense or not.
Quote
ValentinaGermania
I think this is why some doctors tend to diagnose patients with AN with autism. It has some tendencies of autism. They cannot read emotions and get everything you say wrong in this time. But the brain is a wonderful organ and can recover from this and they learn to get these things right again with recovery.
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
Quote
kazi67
My d is very sensitive always has been
always reads my expressions the wrong way always thinks I’m angry or upset
I’ve usually got a lot on my mind and I tell her this or I’m thinking of 100 things I have to do, but she always seems to take it that I’m upset at her 
This was the kid who wanted to please everybody and wanted to make sure everyone else was happy and she can’t stand  to see anyone upset 
sound familiar? I think it’s the personality type that does come with AN
she is now learning it’s ok not to be happy all the time, well it’s impossible 
but in her “perfect” world she wanted everything perfect and everyone happy(and if she pretended to be happy all the time we’ll then no one would know she was actually miserable would they)
Quote
ValentinaGermania
Kazi67, your d seems to be twin of mine, I think this is really the character of most AN kids.
It must be so stressy and exhausting to try to be perfect all the time and to please everybody. They really need to learn that a 80% or 90% is enough for a good life.
Their expectation on everything is so high that real life can never hit that. How frustrating this must be...
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
Quote

        

WTadmin