F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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AUSSIEedfamily

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Reply with quote  #26 
Dear martican,

Our experience with dog has been great and our D's source of unconditional love all the time everytime. Our D has mentioned a few times her dog's love and affection was her means of getting through the really tough times. He is a Cavador a cross between a Labrador & a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. Our D's boyfriend now husband loves the dog as much as our D. When they moved into their own home the dog went with them. Dog & D return to our house 4 days a week as D runs her business from our house.

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martican

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Reply with quote  #27 
Thank you so much for sharing your story, Aussie! The more encouragement and good stories, the better I feel about this decision πŸ˜‰ 
Torie

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Reply with quote  #28 
Yay!  So far so good.

If someone is keeping score, please put my name in the "yes" category to pets for recovery.  My d desperately wanted a cat, which we could't get because her brother is allergic, so we compromised and got a skunk.  (Descented.)

The one caveat I would suggest is that children should not be expected to be responsible for the pet.  In my mind, that is always the parents' job, and especially so when the child is not 100% well.  Generally speaking, it takes adult maturity to care for a high-maintenance pet (e.g., dog), and so it is setting the kid up for failure and guilt if the deal is that the kid is responsible for the pet.  (Usually but not always true even for a hamster or something.)  I think it is best to require the kid to do whatever pet chores your agreement requires, with the understanding that it is your adult responsibility to keep track of what the pet needs at any given moment.  So if you say the dog need a walk now, the kid walks the dog.  Ditto for feeding, brushing, etc. That also lets you adjust expectations downward in times of trouble without making kid feel guilty for reneging on the deal.

Just my opinion and experience; your mileage may vary. xx

-Torie

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martican

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Reply with quote  #29 
Torie, 100% agreed. I am at home, and won't be able to work for another year until she will fully transition to the community school from current special school (I will be required to drive her from one school to another as that's how they integrate them), so that fact contributed to our decision. I sleep in the same room with the pup so she gets a good sleep for school, and I am with her (pup) in the 1st part of the day. She wants to be in charge but she goes to me for guidance. So I kind of go with that feel but she takes advice very good. I have to say she is doing really good so far. She was worried about losing calories while exercising her but this is something my H and I will gladly help as we do our jog/walk rain or shine.  She will start a training session at the end of the month which includes also therapy training, and she can start participating in therapy outings with the group of people who do it.

I assumed the skunk is descented, lol What an interesting choice! Thanks for voting "yes!" πŸ˜‰ I keep a track πŸ˜‰ 
kazi67

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Reply with quote  #30 
Wow this was a lovely reminder
We got our cat (he was a kitten then) 8 months ago to help my d be distracted when she first became ill
What a blessing he has been
We can’t imagine life without him (even though he had a heap of health issues himself and cost us a fortune at the vets) but I have honestly got to say he has been worth every dollar
We even took him up to visit d at hospital yesterday and the smile on her face was priceless!!
Definately agree with getting a pet to help in recovery
They do come at a financial cost so definately must keep that in mind
Nothing like the power of a pets unconditional love though in my opinion
xx
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