F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

Welcome to F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum. This is a free service provided for parents of those suffering from eating disorders. It is moderated by kind, experienced, parent caregivers trained to guide you in how to use the forum and how to find resources to help you support your family member. This forum is for parents of patients with all eating disorder diagnoses, all ages, around the world.

Join these conversations already in progress:
• Road To Recovery - Stories of Hope
• Events for Parents and Caregivers Around the World
• Free F.E.A.S.T Conference Videos

Visit the F.E.A.S.T website for information and support.

If you need help using the forum please reach out to one of the moderators (listed below), or email us at bronwen@feast-ed.org.

Need to talk with another parent? F.E.A.S.T. parents offer peer support via:

cm72
Just got back from the doctor and she wants my daughter to go without lactose for a week or two to test for intolerance.
This is going to be hard! Dairy is usually how I can get high calories in her. Wah!
On a daily basis she eats:
Breakfast  2 servings cereal with milk, banana, 2 chocolates
Lunch  Usually sandwich with lots of cheese, 2 sides
Snack Smoothie
Dinner  Varies but always includes cheese or cream or butter
Snack  Smoothie again or cereal

I'll start searching the threads but my job just got so much tougher.
Quote
Torie
Oh dang, did the doctor explain why you couldn't keep giving dairy products for this "test" and add the lactase drops / tablets to break down the lactose?  I really feel for you. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
Quote
cm72
No, she never did. That's a good point. I should try the lactase for a week and see if that helps.
Quote
Frazzled
Try Lactaid milk and ice cream if she doesn’t like the taste of the tablets. 
Quote
Foodsupport_AUS
Also important to remember that generally lactose free means low lactose rather than complete absence and not all dairy has lactose. Butter is very low in lactose with only trace amounts present, and full fat yoghurt  with live cultures are also naturally low in lactose. Some cheeses have low levels of lactose as well aged cheddar, and parmesan. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Initially weight restored 2012. Relapse and continuously edging towards recovery. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
Quote
Enn

 

To add to the above suggestions...

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/dairy-foods-low-in-lactose#section8

There are many lactose free products now around the world I think.
we have lactose free milk, cream, cheese, yogurt here in Canada.

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
Quote
Kali

Hi CM72,

It won't be that difficult. I'm lactose intolerant and can recommend lactaid and other products. You don't have to decrease calories at all.

https://www.lactaid.com/products


this is how you can change up the menu you posted above if you want:

Breakfast  2 servings cereal with milk, banana, 2 chocolates .  For this substitute lactaid whole milk. It tastes the same as regular milk and is full fat milk.

Lunch  Usually sandwich with lots of cheese, 2 sides .  For this, Manchego cheese is an excellent hard cheese with no lactose or very minimal and I have no symptoms at all when I eat it. Makes great grilled cheese also. here is some info about it. It is made from sheeps milk. Plus it is actually really tasty.

https://www.cheese.com/manchego/

Snack Smoothie .    Substitute lactaid whole milk, and lactaid icecream and lactose free full fat yogurt or kefir. 


Dinner  Varies but always includes cheese or cream or butter

Here is a link to lactose free products you can use to substitute for cream or butter. They also have lactose free kefir, sour cream and yogurt. 

https://greenvalleylactosefree.com/products


Snack  Smoothie again or cereal

So in fact, being lactose intolerant doesn't mean that you stop eating dairy. It just means you eat a different type of dairy.
And if you find yourself out and about and having dinner at someone elses house or a party or something like that, your daughter can take lactaid pills or chewables right before eating and that will help if in fact she is really lactose intolerant and not just trying to get out of drinking milk by claiming she is. 

Can you describe what symptoms is she experiencing in addition saying she has tummy aches? (which I'm going to assume was what she was complaining about but that could also be the eating disorder) There is more to the symptoms of true lactose intolerance than just stomach aches although that is certainly part of it. It also often runs in families and particularly in people who are not of Northern European heritage. Does anyone in your family or her dad's family have it?

Hope this helps.

warmly,
Kali

Food=Love
Quote
cm72
Kali-no-one else in my family has problems with lactose.
She has been having stomach aches, bloating, belching and gassy.
The past couple of days i've been giving her enzymes, probiotic and MIralax. I'm going to try that for a week and see if it resolves. 
If not, i'll try the lactose reduced diet for a week.
Quote
Enn

I am sorry if I do not recall cm72, but has your d been tested for celiac’s? Does the bloating happen with any type of food or specific ones? If you have answered that before, my apologies. Gum chewing and in people who talk a lot (like teachers who need to talk most of the day) may also swallow air- aerophagia and that can cause gas and bloating and sweeteners like xylitol in gum or sugar substitutes in sugar free chocolates or candies can cause this too.
Not sure if this is helpful or not.
Just my thoughts 

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
Quote
Foodsupport_AUS
One thing that I was advised by dietitians very experienced with ED is that nearly 100% of those with restrictive ED's will have some symptoms of FODMAP intolerance during recovery. This does not mean it is long term but is a function of the damage done to the gut and the gut bacteria  with the restriction. They recommended pushing through the symptoms for sometime, even several years before considering testing. Coeliac disease on the other hand should be excluded with at least the blood test. 
Your plan sounds like a great one. Reducing her exposure to lactose first. Sometimes though with probiotics bloating can get worse before it gets better. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Initially weight restored 2012. Relapse and continuously edging towards recovery. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
Quote
ValentinaGermania
If the gum containes sugar substitutes this can also cause bloating if they chew more than one a day (and many ED patients do that exzessivly).
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
Quote

        

WTadmin