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casc Show full post »
mjkz
Torie said it. Ignore the talk, follow with the food, etc.

Do you think having the NG actually has scared her into eating like you thought?  If so you might be able to keep using that as a way to get more food in, i.e. if you don't eat, you will end up back in the hospital with the NG tube, etc.
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casc
Na it didn't scare her, she didn't like staying in hospital but preferred being fed down the tube as she didn't have to eat. But I've threatened saying that if she ends up back there again I will make sure she gets sectioned so everything will be against her will. That way they can do the program properly. In the meantime she is eating really well. Very lengthy but eating so that's something.
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Kali
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In the meantime she is eating really well. Very lengthy but eating so that's something.

[thumb][smile]

Wonderful news!

Kali
Food=Love
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Foodsupport_AUS
I hope your day has gone a little better. 
If at all possible try to let D know of your expectations regarding eating separate from the meal. At meal times she will be really anxious and much more likely to be reactive. Then if she gets up before a meal is finished you can say things such as you know the rules, you must come and sit down and finish your meal.  Many have placed their child in a corner to make it harder for them to get up. When she gets shitty about you sitting with her, the mantra is "I am sorry you are ill but you have to finish your meal". To be honest my D needed to be treated as if she was two not five she had so little insight. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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Torie
Foodsupport_AUS wrote:
When she gets shitty about you sitting with her, the mantra is "I am sorry you are ill but you have to finish your meal".  


That's a great way to put the blame where it belongs - on this vile illness rather than on you.  My d always hated it when I said, "I'm sorry ... it really sucks to have an eating disorder," (in response to about any of her complaints) but it made me feel a little better to say it.

Hang in there. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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mjkz
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Na it didn't scare her, she didn't like staying in hospital but preferred being fed down the tube as she didn't have to eat.


Why didn't she go into the program then?  Was it that she didn't want the tube in and out?  She had to know she was going to have to eat at home and not by tube.

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But I've threatened saying that if she ends up back there again I will make sure she gets sectioned so everything will be against her will. That way they can do the program properly. In the meantime she is eating really well. Very lengthy but eating so that's something.


Hey as long as it goes in, that's what counts.  Hope she can keep it up. 
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casc
She didn't go into the program as she wouldn't consent to having the tube pulled out after meal then reinserted when next meal wasn't complete. So would mean AN would win in hospital as well as everything needed to be consented and I don't think that's the message the hospital wanted to send
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Sotired
How are you getting on casc?are you doing ok?
Sotired42
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ailema
mjkz wrote:
With my daughter when she left the table without finishing, I would follow her with the plate of food.   If she went into her room, I would stay in there and the only way she could get me to leave was to eat the food.  If she refused, the calories would be added to a later meal or she could drink a supplement to make up for the lost calories.  If she refused the next meal with the added calories, she could either eat it at home, drink the supplement or we went to the ER.  There were times that she ate the food as we were on our way to the ER or while we were waiting.  There were other times when she refused to eat at all and the ER would tube feed her.  I would make sure that her team got a call every time we had to go to the ER and after two or three trips, I would start pushing the team pretty hard for a higher level of care.  If she could not eat at home, then she needed to be in a place she would eat either voluntarily because she was required too in a hospital or through a tube.

We also had a time limit for meals and snacks because otherwise I sat at the table all day and far into the night.  She had 45 minutes to an hour for a meal and half an hour for a snack.  If she didn't finish during that time, she got a supplement.  Some people were willing to sit all day but it just didn't work with my daughter.  The food got nasty and she would sit there all day long so we had to use time limits.

Here is a good thread on things people have tried when things like magic plate didn't work.

Also in between meals if she did not finish all the food, she was on complete bed rest.  No electronics, no TV, no reading, only resting in bed because if she couldn't eat enough to keep herself from reversing her weight loss, she needed to expend as little cals as possible.  No one came to visit, no friends over, nothing.  If she finished the meal then she could go about her usual life but with my daughter we had to make not eating more unpleasant than eating. She still ended up inpatient many times but eventually realized that the calories were going in whether she ate them voluntarily or through a tube.
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ailema
How did you set up a system with the ER to feed her? We have gone once but I don't know how we would do this consistently. Does the ER allow it?
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mjkz
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How did you set up a system with the ER to feed her? We have gone once but I don't know how we would do this consistently. Does the ER allow it?


I had our psychiatrist, general physician, and therapist coordinate with the ER.  The psychiatrist had admitting privileges to the hospital that the ER was at and recommended it after several hospital stays very close together because she wouldn't eat at all at home.  The general physician also had admitting privileges.  We also showed up in the ER over and over again sometimes two or three times in a day too.  Everyone recognized something had to change and we got a standing order for tube feeds if she refused a meal.  It was the result of the ER staff seeing us constantly, wanting to help (or get rid of us probably) and our pdoc and therapist as well as her outpatient general doc all coordinating.  We originally did it with her general physician's office where we would go there and they would do it or ER. Either way she got tube fed consistently for every skipped meal.
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