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sweetpetite

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Reply with quote  #101 
I work in a nursing home, and some residents are on a "super foods diet"  if they have trouble keeping their weight up.  I have been using "super food"   Oatmeal made with 2% milk = 400 calories for a small serving and the mashed potatoes pack a good punch too.   

sweetpetite

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Reply with quote  #102 

D's favorite meals/snacks lately:

Nutty Broccoli Slaw - My d eats this by the plateful and will finish off an entire recipe in 2 days as snacks and side dishes.

2 -12 oz. packages broccoli slaw

1 cup sunflower seeds

1 cup sliced honey roasted almonds

2 packages chicken flavor ramen noodles - crunched up

1 bunch green onions (we sometimes leave these out)

Dressing:

2/3 C canola oil

1/3 C red wine vinegar

1/3 C sugar

1 seasoning packet from the ramen noodles

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl - prepare dressing and pour over - mix well and let sit for a while to let ramen noodles soften up a bit when they absorb the dressing.

 

 

Risotto Rice Chicken Alfredo

Prepare risotto rice per package directions (sauté onions in butter and olive oil, add 1 c risotto and add 3 c chicken broth one cup at a time until absorbed)

Put rice into buttered glass baking dish 

Cover with ½ jar ragu Alfredo sauce (or what ever kind you like)

Put boneless skinless chicken breast on top (or chicken thighs)

Cover with remaining Alfredo sauce

Bake at 350 for 45 min to 1 hour until nice and bubbly and the chicken is done.

 

 

Chicken Bake

Take one or two packets of Lipton “savory garlic and herbs” instant soup

Mix it with 1/2 C olive oil and 1/2 C water (this can be adjusted depending on how much chicken you are cooking - just use equal parts oil and water - with 2 packets I am usually cooking a large family size package of chicken thighs) Microwave mixture for 30 seconds and stir

Pour over chicken thighs in glass baking dish (I usually oil the baking dish first)- just enough to coat each piece of chicken well with a little extra around the meat  - but not to swim in (you want the skin to get crispy)

Bake until chicken is done and skin is crispy - its delicious.

I got this crab casserole off the Internet - and D loves it

Crab Casserole

3 eggs

2 cups heavy cream

1 1/2 cups mayonnaise

2 tablespoons chopped onion

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1/2 cup dry sherry

1 (6 ounce) package herb-seasoned dry bread stuffing mix (Stove top)

1 pound cooked crab meat

Bread crumbs

DIRECTIONS

Place eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil and immediately remove from heat. Cover and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool, peel and chop.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Lightly grease an 11x7 inch baking dish.

In a bowl, combine the chopped eggs, heavy cream, mayonnaise, onion, parsley, stuffing and sherry. Stir in the crab meat.

Pour the mixture into prepared baking dish and sprinkle the bread crumbs on top. Bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes or until bubbly and slightly browned on top.

Servings Per Recipe: 8

Amount Per Serving

Calories: 685

Total Fat: 58.1g

Cholesterol: 229mg

Sodium: 835mg

Total Carbs: 20.3g

Dietary Fiber: 0.7g

Protein: 19.1g

 

 

 

 

 

 

mec

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Reply with quote  #103 

YUM! Good for you SP. No wonder your d is putting on weight. My children and h never liked casseroles or mixed foods, ever. So, in our family we pretty much eat everything separated. It is kind of hard getting in a lot of calories that way, but we did OK.


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21 year old daughter who was DX with RAN at 9 years old. The work of recovery is ongoing. 
Elisabeth

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Reply with quote  #104 
I can't believe it has taken me this long to figure this out but I just started pre measuring all the dry ingredients for the 'Marvelous Muffins'. What a time saver in my hectic mornings. I'm now adding a few tablespoons of wheat germ and ground flax seed to muffins each morning. Sliced almonds go over the best at our house for the nut addition. I put all dry ingredients, including nuts in a baggie. Then I just have to melt butter with sugar add egg and sour cream -voila.
grace

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Reply with quote  #105 
My daughter was diagnosed with anorexia last month. She is 11 years old, stands 4 feet 11 inches, and weighs 74 pounds. I have begun refeeding, and simply cannot get her to consume more than 2000 calories per day. I'm using shakes as the backbone of her menu, but am having a very difficult time getting her to consume enough real food at mealtimes to amount to much. She begins the day with half of a large bakery blueberry muffin with butter. Lunch is usually a peanut butter sandwich, heavy on the peanut butter, and a 100-calorie pack of crackers. Dinner is very small indeed. We've had to resort to Carnation Instant Breakfast along with it. She has a couple of small snacks and juice drinks during the day. I realize I should push her intake upward, but she absolutely refuses and tells me she is full. She's never been a big eater, so she probably is. Is there a magic formula for a calorie-dense food that is not intimidating in size?
Any input would be hugely appreciated.
Elisabeth

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Reply with quote  #106 
Laura's muffin recipe on page 1 of this thread is the best compact meal of the day. I have my own variations now and they all sport close to 1000 calories. With a glass of milk it starts the day with 1/3 of the way to 3200 calories. It is our biggest meal of each day and also the easiest since it looks so compact I suspect.
Just yesterday our doctor advised my D that her feelings of being stuffed and even nauseous after meals are normal during recovery. It takes a while for the body to adjust to these meals that it needs. The doctor said the best thing is to keep doing it and eventually her body won't react with a tummy ache. All other signs (weight gain, vitals) are showing that the body is appreciating all this good nutrition.
Harriet

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Reply with quote  #107 
Grace,

Almond butter on a Bruegger's (or other large) bagel will net you about 600 calories and it's not that much food volume wise. If you make a shake with 2 cups Haagen Dazs ice cream and 1 cup of whole milk you're up over 1,000 calories right there. Add in one of the marvelous muffins and you're getting there. My d grew to like granola with yogurt as a breakfast during refeeding--2 cups of granola provides a hefty calorie punch too. Fried chicken is good. Tortellini or ravioli in a rich alfredo or other cream-based sauce, with chicken, also is relatively calorie dense.

You'll find what works for your d. Good luck.


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Chocolate

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Reply with quote  #108 
Grace, and for her stomach disconfort use a heating pad during and after the meal. Our d. sometimes used it in bed to fall asleep.  We also use tons of oil, butter, pesto and shakes.
I know you can do it.
grace

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Reply with quote  #109 
Thanks all for the suggestions. I'm working on it, and will let you know how things are coming along. Yesterday was not so bad, but today our daughter woke up in a very hostile mood and would only eat breakfast when confronted with the reality of being late for school. We've told her we will sign her in late if necessary, but she has to eat. She only consumed a half a muffin, with butter, and not quite all of it, and not quite all of her Carnation in steamed milk.
Harriet, I'll make ravioli for dinner. Can't believe I didn't think of that one. Thanks!
Elisabeth, I've printed the muffin recipe and will bake those tonight.
I love this forum! I just discovered it a week ago, and it's been the one thing I can count on to keep my sanity. Thanks.
Chocolate

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Reply with quote  #110 
Grace, you are not the only one who sanity has been save by this forum, I don't know what I would have done without it. Thanks Laura!
I know you will come with good ideas for meals, the only sugestion I have is that you have to stay firm, if you say she cannot go to school until she finishes breakfast you have to make sure that she finishes everything that you put in front of her before she goes. I know in the beginning is not easy to put so much food in but just try to increase it every day.
Hugs
Mari

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Reply with quote  #111 
Grace,
When my daughter was at her lowest weight we gave an Instant Breakfast at every meal.  We added Super Weight Gainer powder (from GNC) to her milkshakes.  Also, I added nuts ground into a fine powder to any muffin recipe.  No visible nuts, but all the benefits.
grace

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Reply with quote  #112 
Hi, Chocolate,
Thanks for the ideas. Have you found an effective strategy for getting my daughter to finish everything on her plate? We sat with her one night for 1 1/2 hours while she refused to finish her night-time shake. She has tremendous staying power. She screamed and flailed and there was quite a scene. I was concerned that she would get herself so worked up that she would bring on a migraine. She gets these less frequently now that she is on a preventative, but anxiety brings them on. Usually that means 2 days of vomiting and not being able to eat. She ended up drinking most of it, but left a couple of ounces in the glass. Do we just wait it out every time? Offer incentives? What works best? I'm frustrated to say the least.
LauraCollins_US

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Reply with quote  #113 
Grace,

It seems as though each family finds a unique solution to question of whether to sit it out, cajole, threaten, reward.

I think there are a number of right ways. And some ways that don't seem to work. Successes include: continuing to speak to the child you know is in there but isn't - at the moment - doing the talking; refusing to engage in arguments or answer questions that have already been answered; sympathizing with the discomfort without caving to it; calm; optimism; responding to anger and meanness with sympathetic detachment. The one thing that ALWAYS fails: giving in to anything ED wants.

The key at first is finding that groove. Once you've got the rules and parameters clearly established, they feel safer and resist less.

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F.E.A.S.T. Outreach Director
mec

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Reply with quote  #114 
Grace:
I don't make my d finish everything to the last bite. Her OCD behavior needs to leave something behind. There have been many here who have said the same thing. Two oz is quite a bit but if you let her leave a mouthful of a drink or a spoonful of food, she may feel a bit more in control. I just add more knowing that she will leave a little behind. Another thing that works very well for us and for others is to at times give them two choices of similar calories. This morning it was eggs with a large pancake or a bagel. For lunch I made her mac and cheese and that was it, no choices.

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21 year old daughter who was DX with RAN at 9 years old. The work of recovery is ongoing. 
Chocolate

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Reply with quote  #115 
Hi Grace, I agree that I wouldn't fight for a bite left behind but yes for 1/4 of the meal, I know leaving something on the dish give them some control over it, but like many had said serve more.
What it helped us was to be calm when our d. refused to eat, I used to take a book or the newspaper and seat in front of her to let her know that we won't do anything until done, it took her only one day to be late to school. I am not say that it is easy but I know that you can do it.
It does get better!!!!!
grace

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Reply with quote  #116 
Thanks for the encouragement, Chocolate.
Last night was especially horrible. My daughter ate about 1/3 of her dinner, then said she was done. I had to take my other daughter to dance class since my husband was out, but when I returned, I warmed up the rest of her dinner and sat her at the table to eat it. She ran away to her room upstairs. I went up and, surprisingly calm, carried her downstairs kicking and screaming. Some angel was looking over us, I'm sure, keeping us from falling down the stairs. Anyway, my daughter refused for over an hour, screaming and hurling insults my way the whole time. Eventually, she began to eat. At least half of what remained on her plate. I let it go, feeling that I had made my point, with the understanding that I would make her a nourishing milkshake later and would expect her to drink the whole thing. She became so contrite, crying, telling me I have no idea how horrible this thing is. She curled up in my lap and relaxed for a long while. And later, she drank the whole 800 calorie shake! I've never been through something so harrowing in my life, but I feel like we approached some breakthrough.
Lisa

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Reply with quote  #117 
Congratulations Grace!  You did what you knew had to be done and the ed backed down.  It'll get easier. 
LauraCollins_US

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Reply with quote  #118 
Grace,

Sending admiration and cheers! Every battle you win against the ED is a huge reassurance to your child. You made her feel safe. You did great.

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Laura (Collins) Lyster-Mensh
F.E.A.S.T. Outreach Director
lydia

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Reply with quote  #119 
Grace

AWESOME! Our children really want to be rescued, we can never forget that in the rough patches.
Sending courage & more strength!

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The greater your belief that you are stronger, smarter, and have more staying power than ed; the greater the chance your child will come to believe that too.
grace

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Reply with quote  #120 
Thank you. all, for your support and encouragement. I feel ready for the fight.
md

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Reply with quote  #121 
If you like to cook, I recommend using "Cooking Light" magazine and Better Homes and Gardens cookbooks.  I know, it might seem oxymoronic to use "Cooking Light" when preparing food for something with an ED, but I recommend the magazine anyway.  All the recipes have nutritional information (including calories); many of the recipes aren't geared to deprivation diets; and higher-fat ingredients can almost be substituted for lower-fat ingredients.  Similarly, many of the BH&G cookbooks that I've used contain nutritional info for every recipe.
Chocolate

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Reply with quote  #122 
Congratulations Grace! you won the battle this time. I knew you could do it!.
Sending hugs.
monicak1

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Reply with quote  #123 

Way to go Grace... You won a battle not only for you and your daughter, but for all us. We know we can keep on going...

grace

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Reply with quote  #124 
Today is a very hard day. Being Saturday, I thought I would be better able to feed my daughter, but she is difficult beyond belief, recalcitrant, trying to strike deals. She's stringing her meals and snacks out so long, I'm sure it feels to her that she's eating nonstop. As soon as she finishes the last sip of her shake, there I am with the next item. But I can't let her fall too far behind. I really don't think I'll be able to get more than 2500 calories into her today, if that. Also, she's getting very shrewd about my motives. I gave her 1/4 cup of almonds, and she looked up the calorie value and said she's not eating them any more. She used to love almonds!
Harriet

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Reply with quote  #125 
grace,
weekends were always toughest for us during refeeding. i think the lack of structure lent itself to free-floating anxiety and the time to obsess. hang tough. it does get better. also, if i were you i'd get all the calorie counters, etc. out of the house. i also did not allow my d on the computer unsupervised during recovery, so she couldn't go looking things up or going to pro-ana sites.




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