F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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Littlebuthopeful
Hi All
So... this forum and reaching out over the internet is all very new for me so please bear with me while I get this off my chest (so to speak!).
My daughter is now 14 and a half and is currently under-going treatment in a eating disorder clinic approximately 5 hours drive away from our home.
This is her second time there.  She was first there at the beginning of the year after we tried and tried to get her to gain weight at home but the progress was so very slow (approx 6 kg's in a year) so we made the hard decision to admitt her.  She was there for 5 weeks and because it was over the xmas / school holidays it made it easier for us to spend time with her while she was on the ward.  When she was discharged, she lost all the weight and some more so the team she was seeing in our home town and ourselves made the hard decision again to send her back.  For 12 weeks we and just I made the trip back and forth at weekends to see her.  She was going so well and things were on track to discharge her at the end of the month but she since got very sick with the flu and lost quite abit of weight so that has set her back.  She has been home the past few weekends and the first one went well with a good weight gain but the last one was not so good.  She was left to her own a few times and although I thought she was doing ok, I guess deep down I knew she wasn't having enough and over exercising.  So weigh in time and she lost 1.5 kgs in four days!!!  How does that even happen!!!!  So disappointed in myself for allowing false hope and listening to her saying she was all ok when clearly she is not!!!
I'm am know at a loss as to what to do next!!!  No home leave for her this weekend so I'll be making the trip back to see her.  I just don't know what to say to her anymore to make her understand that the ED is stopping her coming home.  She is so sad there and most conversations over Skype during the weeks as I work and have another daughter, end in tears and her just wanting to come home. This is all so very hard and I just am at a loss as to what's the best next steps.  Do I tell her the timeframe plan in the hope that it will make her see that coming home is on the cards but all dependent on her controlling the ED and not the other way around?? Clearly we have some ideas and plans to put in place when she is next home but I guess I am TERRIFIED that when she comes home that things will go bad again and on the other hand I just want her home cause I really don't know if she will be able to cope with another few months away.  What to say to her to help is the biggest struggle that I have - no magic wand here [frown]
OMG this is all a bit of a ramble really so may not make any sense to anyone but any words of wisdom / advice would really be greatly appreciated 😉
 
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Torie
Hello, and welcome.  I'm really sorry you needed to join us here, but this is really the best place for information and support.

It is very common to have a difficult transition home.  Do they allow opportunities for you to feed her a meal or two when you visit?  

Many find it best to try to replicate whatever it is that they do in the treatment center.  What happens if she doesn't finish her meal?  Very often, they will require 1 Boost (Fortisip) as a replacement if part of the meal is refused or 2 Boosts if more than half goes uneaten.  The idea is that one way or other, the calories will go in.  The trick is to close all the loopholes and make it impossible for them to avoid finishing each meal and snack.

Please feel free to ask all the questions you like. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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Mamaroo
Welcome form me as well. So sorry that you need to find yourself here.

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
  She was first there at the beginning of the year after we tried and tried to get her to gain weight at home but the progress was so very slow (approx 6 kg's in a year) so we made the hard decision to admitt her.  She was there for 5 weeks and because it was over the xmas / school holidays it made it easier for us to spend time with her while she was on the ward.  When she was discharged, she lost all the weight and some more so the team she was seeing in our home town and ourselves made the hard decision again to send her back.  


Can you give us some information what happened when she was discharged the first time. Did she have a mealplan or was it all left in your hands? Was she able to choose her own meals and snacks and did she have fear foods? 

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
  She has been home the past few weekends and the first one went well with a good weight gain but the last one was not so good.  She was left to her own a few times and although I thought she was doing ok, I guess deep down I knew she wasn't having enough and over exercising.  So weigh in time and she lost 1.5 kgs in four days!!!  How does that even happen!!!!  So disappointed in myself for allowing false hope and listening to her saying she was all ok when clearly she is not!!!


We've all been there, don't be so hard on yourself. They need constant vigilance and if you don't see the food going in, assume it didn't go in. At the moment you can't believe anything she says. I can only believe my d now and it is more than a year post WR. This is such a long process.

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
 Do I tell her the timeframe plan in the hope that it will make her see that coming home is on the cards but all dependent on her controlling the ED and not the other way around??


She can't control ED, I'm sorry to say it. When she is discharged from IP, it will be your job to control ED and to eventually evict ED. She can't do it on her own and won't be able to do it for the next couple of years. She needs you to give her structure and routine around eating (imagine you are the cast on a broken arm). 

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
Clearly we have some ideas and plans to put in place when she is next home but I guess I am TERRIFIED that when she comes home that things will go bad again and on the other hand I just want her home cause I really don't know if she will be able to cope with another few months away.


Can you tell us more about the plans, we can add to it and give you some more tips. If the treatment team didn't give you a mealplan you can use the one I've attached here. Fill it in and put it on the fridge so that she can expect what to eat, this will greatly reduce her anxiety.

Keep the timing of the meals consistent and supervise every single one of them. Limit exercise for the first year at least. My d used to dance and do gymnastics prior to ED. Now she is only allowed to do after school sport for an hour once a week with friends (so it is more of a social event). She never returned to dancing or gymnastics.


D became obsessed with exercise at age 9 and started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. View my recipes on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLW6A6sDO3ZDq8npNm8_ww
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Warrior1
Hi Littlebuthopeful,

I am so sorry you are having a difficult time at the moment. The inpatient facility is not going to cure, fix or help your D enough to get rid of anorexia you are going to have to do some of the hard work I’m afraid.

Have you had any access to resources such as the Lock and le Grange book or Eva Musby’s book so you can understand exactly what you need to do. Deep down your daughter so desperately wants to eat she just can’t and you need to learn techniques and strategies to help her eat at home otherwise I worry you may end up stuck in a cycle of inpatient admissions.

As others have said she can not control the ED you are going to have to do this for her and she will almost require 24hr supervision to begin with to make sure she is eating everything required of her and not exercising or purging by another method.

Feedback not failure is a great phrase that pops up here often, so you need to think about what happened the last time she was home and what went wrong and why she lost weight and then change your approach the next time to prevent the same thing happening again. You said she was exercising so plan how you will stop this the next time etc etc. Good luck we are all here to help you. Xx
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ValentinaGermania
Hi and a very warm welcome from Germany!
The transition at home is really difficult. You need to have a clear and fix plan for the next weekend stay.
No exercising. If necessary sleep with her. Hang out her bedroom door so it would be harder for her to do it secretly.
Fixed meal plan. Same meals and snacks and mealtimes as in IP. We did this for a long time. Try to run your home the same way as the IP ward.

"When she was discharged, she lost all the weight and some more"
What did you do after the fist discharge? Did you have a plan for transition from IP? Maybe they told you to leave food intake on her and that was the mistake. Can you desribe how this first transition went so we can help you with ideas what to try this time to avoid that weight loss?

Transition home is difficult but if you have a plan A, B, C in mind you will soon feel much stronger and not so terrified. You need to prepare that and then it will go better than last time. I think the team did not prepare you enough for that the last time.
Do not give up. Recovery is possible, you "just" need to find out what you need to do. It is great that you found us here, we can help you with ideas. It is all try and error. You need to find out what works for your family and then it will get better.

Come here to ask and to vent, here are a lot of nice parents that can help you. We have all been in your shoes.
Tina72
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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Littlebuthopeful
Thanks everyone for all you kind words of encouragement.
Is reply to some questions, last time no I feel we weren't armed with enough to help prepare us for her coming home.  She never has had a problem eating with us so we are lucky I guess with that but if she is left to her own things certainly go of the rails, both with not eating and exercise.
This time round the IP team are putting plans in place to send her home over the next month for weekends to see how that all goes and then for a week so she can go to school and make sure that things stay on track.
We are having a much more structured meal plan this time too - I thought we had that last time but maybe not!! At her school they have 2 breaks so I'm going to popping out for her lunch one with her lunch so she can't say that she had it already.  So all meals and snacks will be supervised and I'll be making sure that we have a list of acceptable snack foods for her too so not swapping for lower foods items like last time.
Great timing and thanks for the books suggestions - I have just got one from the library and order the other one from Eva so that will be arriving soon and looking forward to reading them both.
I'm happy to sleep in the same room as her to stop middle of the night exercise but I guess my question is what can we do when we aren't in the house with her.  We are a busy active family and sometimes not always there to supervise her 24/7 so that will be a struggle that I guess we will just work through.
I'm not 100% sure of how to reply to everyone so sorry if I repeat myself a few times (LOL)
Thanks again everyone - it's great to hear from parents that have been or are in the same situation.
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Littlebuthopeful

Can you give us some information what happened when she was discharged the first time. Did she have a mealplan or was it all left in your hands? Was she able to choose her own meals and snacks and did she have fear foods? 

We thought we had a meal plan in place and generally it went ok when we were there.  Things went bad when she was unsupervised at school etc.  We gave her a little bit of room for some swaps to help stop any fights but I can see that that was not the right thing to do [frown]


Can you tell us more about the plans, we can add to it and give you some more tips. If the treatment team didn't give you a mealplan you can use the one I've attached here. Fill it in and put it on the fridge so that she can expect what to eat, this will greatly reduce her anxiety.

So the plans are making sure that d is supervised for ALL meals and making she that her exercise is reduced until we can see that things are still on track and then I guess just slowing re-introducing things into her life.  It's hard because she always has been very sporty even before this happened so just trying to manage that will be a challenge in itself but I need to take the tough love road over this.
Thanks for the meal plan - I will be using this and having it on the fridge for her to help reduce anxiety.  I'm also going to speak to the dietitian and make sure we have a list of acceptable snack foods as this is one area we struggle with, and also "extra" food items if she does do a sport or PE at school.


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Enn

Hello, 
I too welcome you here although I am sorry you need to be here.
You say:

"She was left to her own a few times and although I thought she was doing ok, I guess deep down I knew she wasn't having enough and over exercising.  So weigh in time and she lost 1.5 kgs in four days!!!  How does that even happen!!!! " 
So you learn here that you need to be with her all the time. It is feedback and not failure, we all have a lot to learn. Ed is a huge steep learning curve. 

She needs supervision 24/7. I want you to throw out all your feelings and information about how to parent. You need to shift your thinking and really take care of her like an infant. There is no reasoning with ED. So sorry, but that is what many of had to do for a long time if you are going to help her. 
So with us, having a child that stood all the time, really all the time- we had to break that and get rid of it altogether. She would freak out going in the car, sitting at the table, restaurant etc . We had to insist she sit, no long walks no exercise, no gym at school no physical play at home. Yah we had to do that.

Others had severe exercise compulsion. These are both ED driven and have to stop, I literally mean ,STOP not decrease. So PE may be out for the foreseeable future. She can do another project that is not ED triggering or related to "healthy eating" . I pulled my D out of PE for most of the year and the school knew to contact me about ANY health projects. School is not that important, her health is the MOST Important.

Have you discussed with the school?

I am glad you have a higher calorie plan to work with now. 

You also say"I'm happy to sleep in the same room as her to stop middle of the night exercise but I guess my question is what can we do when we aren't in the house with her.  We are a busy active family and sometimes not always there to supervise her 24/7 so that will be a struggle that I guess we will just work through." Yes you will have to work through that and unfortunately I have to say, the whole family has to be involved in taking care of ED. Your normal routines may need to change quite a bit to take care or your ED D.  You also say that you will reduce exercise again I will harp on this point, she needs to stop!

As for the dietitian, most have found that you can do this without one. Look up the high calorie meals and snack posts. I will find and post for you. Add oil, cream (heavy whipping cream) butter, cheese to every thing you can This will add more calories in a smaller "foodprint" so she may not get so upset by the volume of food to get the appropriate calories. Once you get a good routine of eating and high calories, things do get better, but so hard at first.
Torie mentioned above to try to emulate what they did in hospital. We did that. I learned the schedule for eating 3 meals and 3 snacks. I made some of the same meals ie peanut butter and jam sandwiches, so that when she came home I would say, "this is what they did in the hospital- so this is what we do at home".

Please know that your D is very ill mentally too and that you cannot reason/rationalize with her at all. You have to make the decisions, all of them. for her. She or rather ED, cannot be trusted.  You need to give her her medicine and that is food, you keep her safe from exercise. 
Sending you support.
XXX

food+ more food+ time + love+ good professional help + ATDT ( I will add now)+ NO exercise= healing ---->recovery(----> life without ED)

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Enn

Here is high calorie post. 

It is very helpful
XXX
https://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/high-calorie-snacks-5794369?pid=1305330823#gsc.tab=0

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Enn

here is a post that toothfairy posts. It is from another care giver who has been there too. 
I found it to be a great list of what we need to do and how to think about this illness.


"Helpful Notes From A Fellow Carer.
 1. You prepare meals
2. Do not allow your child in the kitchen during meal prep
3. Your child should not go grocery shopping.
4. Toilet before meal and no toilet for at least an hour afterwards.
5. If purging is suspected, use an open door policy in the bathroom, or have them count or sing whilst in there. And no flushing
6. Do not negotiate - whatever you serve has to be eaten
7. Use whatever leverage you have - phone, Internet, tv - whatever they hold dear is to be removed if they refuse to eat, until they have eaten. If they're older and are not financially independent, this is your leverage
8. Separate the two - Your child is not the ED
9. Detach yourself from the situation during meals. Do not get drawn into emotional discussions. THIS IS NOT UP FOR NEGOTIATION
10. Remember that your child wants to recover - the ED is stopping them
11. Your child needs your permission to eat. They need you to stand up to ED as they do not have the strength to do so themselves
12. 3 meals and 3 snacks per day (supervised) - do not deviate from this. Add time limits to the meals (as a guide/goal!). Ours (and the hospitals) was 30 mins for meals and 15 mins for snacks. In the early days this could extend A LOT. I made my Ds meal times the same as they'd be at school so that when she transitioned back to full time it would be easier and less anxiety provoking.
13. High calories are needed throughout re-feeding with lots of full fat dairy. Some need as much as 6,000 cals with hyper metabolism, but the norm would be minimum ‪3500-4000‬ cals (for you to track not your child)
14. When they know you will not negotiate, I promise you will see the weight lifted from their shoulders... If only for very short periods
15. BE THE CAGE that keeps ED away from your child
16. When food is eaten be mum / dad again and have cuddles if they'll let you
17. ‪24/7‬ supervision - I slept with my D for 4 months - this will protect against them purging through vomiting or exercise. Many patients will exercise alone at night for hours on end when nobody else is awake.
18. All sport may need to stop in the early stages, and for those who compulsively exercised this could be long term.
19. Be consistent, consistent consistent!
20. Don't congratulate them after a meal or say 'well done' - just cheer inwardly! Likewise when (for girls) their period returns!
21. Learn from others. I found  stories of other parents journey through recovery to be extremely helpful.
22. Recommended reading: 'Brave Girl Eating' by Harriet Brown
23. Be prepared for resistance, and lots of it! You will find your own way to manage this, but NEVER back down. Any compromise is a win for ED. Remember, you have to see the beast to slay beast!
24. Making decisions / choices is extremely difficult for them (painful to watch). This is true in areas outside of food too. If you've tried to hand over some control of a meal or snack and notice that they are struggling, that is an indication that it is too soon and that you need to be making those decisions for them.
25. Sometimes distraction helps during meal times. That can come in the form of games,TV, music. Whatever it is you control it and it only continues with eating.
26. Make sure all weighing scales are removed from the house.
27. Lean on us - you have ‪24/7‬ support here as We are International ."

Remember there is always someone here that has been there, where you are, we understand this battle intimately and we want to help you. 
"Lean on us" 

XXX

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Torie
Normally, we encourage everyone to take one day at a time and try not to look forward, but I want to ask you to travel ahead in time with me for just a minute.  My d was roughly the same timeline so we were refeeding as she turned 15.  That gave us three years at a good weight before she went away to university.  Please believe me when I tell you how much I appreciated that she had been at a good weight so long!  I wished I could have had yet another year to keep her under my watchful eye - this vile illness is so insidious and relapse is so common.

So please please please do all that you can to get her back to a good weight asap.  I promise it is worth every sacrifice you need to make.  You said:

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
I'm happy to sleep in the same room as her to stop middle of the night exercise but I guess my question is what can we do when we aren't in the house with her.  We are a busy active family and sometimes not always there to supervise her 24/7 so that will be a struggle that I guess we will just work through.


Unfortunately, ED takes a toll on the whole family, as does any other lethal illness.  (AN has roughly the same mortality rate as childhood cancer.)  Whatever you have to do ... you "just" have to do it.  That pretty much means 24/7/365 although obviously there will be times everyone (including ED-d) is sleeping.  WHen she is able to attend school, that gives you a break although you may need to be with her for lunch and any daytime snacks.

Sucks, but so worth it.  My d is off at university like a normal young woman her age.  I would have pretty much sacrificed both arms and legs for that.

Time is precious.  Luckily, you have enough.  Others here are not so lucky to have so many years until university.

We know it sucks.  Although we don't understand all the particulars of your household, we understand all too well how much it sucked in our own households.  Whatever you have to do, you will not regret it.

Keep swimming. xx

-Torie
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
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Mamaroo
Littlebuthopeful wrote:

Is reply to some questions, last time no I feel we weren't armed with enough to help prepare us for her coming home. 


One is never prepared enough, no amount of reading books or watching videos can replace real life experience with ED. I like to quote Morpheus in The Matrix: "There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path." This is so true with ED. But like the others have said, feedback not failure. You'll get great advice here at this forum.

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
At her school they have 2 breaks so I'm going to popping out for her lunch one with her lunch so she can't say that she had it already. 


Brilliant! We organised with the school to meet her in the car park in that way she didn't need to sign out/in. 

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
So all meals and snacks will be supervised and I'll be making sure that we have a list of acceptable snack foods for her too so not swapping for lower foods items like last time.


We divided snacks into 3 groups, small, medium (= 2 small snacks) and large snacks (= 2 medium snacks). Normally she got a muesli bar (medium snack), but was allowed to swap it for a (full cream) yoghurt or 2 small snacks (fruit + glass of milk) for example. At the beginning my d wasn't allowed to pick her own snacks, but as she got closer to WR she was allowed to choose her own snacks provided they were large enough.

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
I'm happy to sleep in the same room as her to stop middle of the night exercise but I guess my question is what can we do when we aren't in the house with her.  We are a busy active family and sometimes not always there to supervise her 24/7 so that will be a struggle that I guess we will just work through.


There is a saying here LSUYE (Life Stops Until You Eat), it refers to the ED child not being able to do anything until the food is eaten, however we soon found that LSUYE applies to the whole family. We all had to stop our extra activities while refeeding. Getting 6 meals a day into a child taking 30-60 minutes add up and there is not much left of the day (or energy for that matter). Having said that it is important to take time away from ED. As someone always had to be with ED-D we took turns taking other d out for shopping/beach/lunch/movie or just having a break.
Can you ask other family members (grand parents, aunties) to supervise her if you can't be with her? 

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
I'm not 100% sure of how to reply to everyone so sorry if I repeat myself a few times (LOL)

Here is a thread, the second post shows how to reply. Took me a while to figure it out!
https://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/forum-welcome-user-guide-9806898?pid=1305156196#gsc.tab=0

Littlebuthopeful wrote:
So the plans are making sure that d is supervised for ALL meals and making she that her exercise is reduced until we can see that things are still on track and then I guess just slowing re-introducing things into her life.  It's hard because she always has been very sporty even before this happened so just trying to manage that will be a challenge in itself but I need to take the tough love road over this.


Reintroducing sport too early into recover greatly increases their chances of relapse.
Here is an excellent post from Julie O'Toole regarding the return to sport:
https://www.kartiniclinic.com/blog/post/exercise-and-the-severely-anorexic-patient/

I know this is a lot to take in and I'm not going to sugar coat this, this is a very long and hard journey, but having a healthy child, who is able to do normal teenager stuff makes all the sacrifices worth it.
D became obsessed with exercise at age 9 and started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. View my recipes on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLW6A6sDO3ZDq8npNm8_ww
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Foodsupport_AUS
Welcome to the forum. 

Transitions with ED are hard just like getting weight on is often difficult. The better you can do this with insistence that it is what needs to happen the better things are going to go in the long run. 

Early on I think she does need someone with her all day every day. If she has an exercise compulsion or purges at all time alone is a great risk for her. It is not just getting the food in that is important for recovery, it is dealing with the urges for compensatory behaviour - restriction, exercise, purging, laxatives. They all need to be stopped - completely. 

How are things going with weight restoration now? It is important to know that many parents have found that their child needed to get to a weight higher than any previous weight for recovery. It also needs to be maintained for a long time. 

When planning on coming home, I think it is really important that you keep your emotions and her emotions out of it. 
She needs to continue gaining weight. She needs a plan that will maintain that - meal plan, structures in place to manage refused meals. Increases as needed if her weight gain is not continuing. 
She needs supervision for her exercise compulsions and a plan to manage that too.

Working on how you are going to manage the potential snags will leave you able to cope better when they occur, and they will. Recovery is rarely a straight line. 

Once you have those things in place, it is then time to work on her psychological recovery. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Mostly recovered 10 years later.  Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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deenl
Hi littlebuthopeful,

And welcome to the forum.

Many carers have found that our kids do not track along the timeline of standard treatment protocols and that we have had to supervise for much longer.

This is a great thread that shows what it's like in reality. I do hope it empowers you and doesn't scare you. If it does induce full on panic, please read this [wink]

We have all been there and you will have learnt so much from last time. The illness is impossible to treat without trial and error.

Warm wishes,

D

2015 12yo son restricting but no body image issues, no fat phobia; lost weight IP! Oct 2015 home, no progress. Medical hosp to kick start recovery Feb 2016. Slowly gaining at home, seeing signs of our real kid.

May 2017 Hovering around WR. Mood great, mostly. Summer 2017 Happy, first trip away in years, food variety, begin socialising. Sept 2017, back to school FT first time in 2 years. 2018 growing so fast hard to keep pace with weight. 2020 Off to university, healthy and happy.
  • Swedish proverb: Love me when I least deserve it because that's when I need it most.
  • We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence Recovery, then, is not an act but a habit. Aristotle.
  • If the plan doesn't work, change the plan but never the goal.
  • We cannot control the wind but we can direct the sail.
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ValentinaGermania
"I'm happy to sleep in the same room as her to stop middle of the night exercise but I guess my question is what can we do when we aren't in the house with her.  We are a busy active family and sometimes not always there to supervise her 24/7 so that will be a struggle that I guess we will just work through."

To leave her at home without supervision will not work. She can exercise or purge and so distroy all your work with eating. And she will be alone with that bully ED in her head...

My ideas:
Can you take some time off from work for transition time?
Can you take her with you? Some parents took their kids with them to work and gave them little "jobs" for distraction.
Can you have a friend or relative which is on the same page with you about ED treatment as a "babysitter" at home?

Tina72
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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Littlebuthopeful
[QUOTE=Mamaroo

We divided snacks into 3 groups, small, medium (= 2 small snacks) and large snacks (= 2 medium snacks). Normally she got a muesli bar (medium snack), but was allowed to swap it for a (full cream) yoghurt or 2 small snacks (fruit + glass of milk) for example. ]

I would love if you would be able to let me know the types of foods you used with you snack groups.  This sounds like a wonderful and very helpful idea that I'm sure would make our lifes a little easier when snacks are involved 😉
Thanks in advance.
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Mamaroo
Littlebuthopeful wrote:

I would love if you would be able to let me know the types of foods you used with you snack groups.  This sounds like a wonderful and very helpful idea that I'm sure would make our lifes a little easier when snacks are involved 😉
Thanks in advance.


Small snack (75-100 cal):
piece of fruit (limit 1 day)
small serving of yogurt (175g)
small glass of milk (125ml)
frozen yogurt snack
2 cheese sticks
2 twiggy (salami) sticks
bliss balls (lemon coconut or date)
crumpet with butter

medium snacks (150-200 cal):
cup of milk (250 ml)
125g full fat greek yogurt
scoop of dried fruit (figs, apricots, dates)
scoop of nuts
muesli bars
oat bars
latte (chai, macha, tumeric) made with 3/4 cup of milk
protein shake
medium muffin (those you make in a 12 muffin tray)
pizza scroll
glass of juice
2 x cheese with 4 crackers

Large snack (300-400 cal):
large smoothie/milkshake made with ice cream/ added oil
large sachet latte (chai/hot chocolate sachet and made with milk instead with water)
large muffin (those you make in a 6 muffin tray)
generous slice of cake


D became obsessed with exercise at age 9 and started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. View my recipes on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLW6A6sDO3ZDq8npNm8_ww
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