F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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everhopeful
Hi all,

Haven't posted in a while but I read all your stories often.

I'm just wanting some information / experiences with weight and height centiles for children and young adults.

Should weight centiles and height centiles correspond? So, for example, if a child or young person is on the 60th %ile for height, should they be on the 60th %ile for weight also? Or is it more normal for them to vary?

I was looking back at my Ds growth charts. When she was 18 (she is now 26) she was on the 97th %ile for height (174cm) and on the 50th %ile for weight (60Kg). Was I wrong in thinking that was okay?

Today she is 26, still 174cm tall and approx 54Kg, although I can't be totally sure. She lives independently and I have no control over her health or healthcare.

Thanks in advance [smile]
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Foodsupport_AUS
It doesn't quite work that way. People of course come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes shorter and wider or taller and thinner, but they are often not a long way apart. This is one of the few advantages of BMI because it does take into account the both weight and height. You do have some reference points. For example you know that she should be heavier than 60kg now. It is normal for people to gain weight until their early 20's, so she should definitely be more than she was at age 18. 

At age 18 her BMI was just under 20. This is the 25th centile for BMI so only 25% of girls at this age have a BMI of less than that level, while 75% are higher. Some will be OK at this ratio but others will not. Her current BMI is in the underweight adult range. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Mostly recovered 10 years later.  Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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sahmmy
Do you have data for her when she was a child, especially pre-puberty? What height/weight centiles did she track along then?
Some kids can track along 97%ile height and 50%ile weight growing up. If she did that since the age of 2, that might be where she belongs. That can be normal for some people.
Just because she is 97% tall doesn't mean she must weight 97%ile.
Convert to English system for my frame of reference. 5'8.5" 120 lbs.
Her weight is between the 25th and 50th %ile for a 20-year-old.
Her BMI is 18. That's considered underweight.
A 20-year-old female at the 50th percentile weighs 128 lbs (58 kg). Women should continue to put on weight until the age of 50 or 60, so at 26 years old, she should weight more than 128 if she tracked along the 50th percentile as a child.
Another way to look at it is 100 lbs for 5 ft tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 foot tall. According to that guideline, she should weigh about 140 lbs - 145 lbs. That's 63-66 kg.
d=18, R-AN, Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Refed at home with information gathered from this forum and lots of books. Relapsed. Refed. Relapsed. Refed. 17 sessions with an excellent individual therapist. 19 sessions with unhelpful dietician. 3 sessions of DBT (didn't like it). Psychiatrist available if needed. Prozac - fail. Lexapro - fail. 5HTP - fail. Clorazepam/Klonopin = major improvement, only used when necessary. Genomind SLC6A4 short/short - not able to process SSRI's.
d=15, lost 14 lbs in 8 months, Ped [nono]diagnosed as a crystal on a hair in the ear canal
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everhopeful
I would have to dig through boxes to find data from when she was 2, but I can recall from memory that she was 61Kg at the age of 15 (had to be weighed for a medical for overseas travel) and roughly the same height, she reached her adult height fairly early in adolescence.

I guess it's pointless pondering anyway. I have no control over her health now, so knowing how much extra weight she needs only serves to make me feel more powerless in the whole thing.  
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sahmmy
If you can dig up some data, here's the growth chart we use in the US. If you google search for other "CDC growth charts" there are more for different ages. CDC = Center for Disease Control.
https://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/data/set2clinical/cj41c072.pdf
61 kg (135 lbs) puts her right on the 75%ile for a 15 year old.
75%ile for a 20-year-old is 142 lbs (64.4 kg)
She should be more than that at 26 years old.
d=18, R-AN, Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Refed at home with information gathered from this forum and lots of books. Relapsed. Refed. Relapsed. Refed. 17 sessions with an excellent individual therapist. 19 sessions with unhelpful dietician. 3 sessions of DBT (didn't like it). Psychiatrist available if needed. Prozac - fail. Lexapro - fail. 5HTP - fail. Clorazepam/Klonopin = major improvement, only used when necessary. Genomind SLC6A4 short/short - not able to process SSRI's.
d=15, lost 14 lbs in 8 months, Ped [nono]diagnosed as a crystal on a hair in the ear canal
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everhopeful
Thanks Sahmmy,

Any ideas on how to convince a completely independent 26 year old that she needs to gain at least 10Kg? I feel so helpless.
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everhopeful
We're in Australia.

She's not in any treatment. Completely independent, full-time job etc.

Her GP had her put under medical guardianship, however that didn't achieve anything simply because of the way the system is set up. Even with guardianship she couldn't be forced into any kind of treatment. She's no longer under guardianship, it was lifted after 12 months.
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Foodsupport_AUS
A fellow Aussie here. With your D being an adult and fully independent, unless it is possible to prove immediate life threatening risk it is impossible to "force treatment" on your D. Our rules for forced compulsory treatment assume that most adults have capacity and there is generally a strong reluctance for compulsory treatment in view of old historical abuses of human rights in compulsory treatment. This essentially means that your best bet is working with your D to encourage her to seek and work on treatment and if at all possible to get her to use you or another close person as her support to help her move on. Have you looked at the courses run by both Butterfly clinic and those run by other eating disorder state based groups that are directed at carers? These are mostly based on motivational interviewing and are designed for this situation. I did the "Building Hope" course run by EDV some years back and found it very useful even though my D at the time was still quite young. It is probably even more useful now she is nearly 20 and still not in full recovery. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Mostly recovered 10 years later.  Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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