F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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Faddywrite
Hi after my daughter couldn't walk home in the park last week she is really responding by eating extra breakfast,  lots of snacks including things like porridge pots, peanut butter fruit loaf nuts etc. However, she still tries v hard to stick to the nhs recommended sugar fat and salt values, so still won't touch puddings, ice cream etc. We made her eat a chocolate brownie last weekend which was her Camhs homework, and she was v anxious about eating sweet things for a few days afterwards, accusing her dad of ruining her day when he made her try one biscuit the day after the brownie. She has managed to gain 1.2kg this week by eating more of the food she likes and feels is safe. Does it matter too much if we carry on like this just introducing fear foods occasionally, as this is the first time she has gained this much weight in one week ever! She is even looking at the calories in bread and asking me to buy one that is more calorific!!! This is probably how her autism is handling things, as she also doesn't want to do over an hour of walking etc because that is the nhs suggestion and she is scared of collapsing again if she overdoes the walking. However, tonight I want her to try some ice cream and she will hate that..She weights 43.9kg and is 162cm tall..To me she looks so thin but Camhs don't tell me how underweight she is, so I don't know. 
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tina72
"However, she still tries v hard to stick to the nhs recommended sugar fat and salt values, so still won't touch puddings, ice cream etc. We made her eat a chocolate brownie last weekend which was her Camhs homework, and she was v anxious about eating sweet things for a few days afterwards, accusing her dad of ruining her day when he made her try one biscuit the day after the brownie."

As this is still not normal and surely ED behaviour you should work on that. Whatever you think is better, laddering or doing it at once is your decision. But you need to get her used to sugar and sweets again like every normal kid would. The brain needs fat AND sugar to work well and it is not normal to be afraid of a brownie.

1,2 kg is great but she has a lot more kg to go so as fast as possible is the best you can do!
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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Faddywrite
Yes she has done so well this week but still.has long way to go. Facing ice cream.tonight which she dreads  and roast potatoes which she will eat but isn't happy about. After such a good week by Friday when I gave her a very calorific veggie burger, she tried to leave some of it and when we went to her youth club she started to.say she felt fat and she felt like her stomach was huge. She hasn't said that before but I guess its because she is finally putting on weight.
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KLB
I think you're doing a brilliant job, and I would say if she's gaining and stays gaining doing what you're doing, then keep doing it. 

We haven't introduced any fear foods except a smoothie in the 7 months we've been trying to refeed. There's too many other more harmful behaviours to tackle first for our s. 
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scaredmom
mimi321 wrote:
The guideline for walking an hour a day is not for someone who has anorexia and needs to gain weight.


Mimi321 has a great point here. 
XXX
Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Faddywrite
Yes the good thing though is that before she collapsed she would try to do more exercise, so this is an acceptance that she can't do much until she gains. The hour is just walking up the road to.school.and back plus the walking she does round school. 
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Faddywrite
KLB wrote:
I think you're doing a brilliant job, and I would say if she's gaining and stays gaining doing what you're doing, then keep doing it. 

We haven't introduced any fear foods except a smoothie in the 7 months we've been trying to refeed. There's too many other more harmful behaviours to tackle first for our s. 


Thankyou for the encouragement! Yes I know my daughter is trying so hard to eat more and this week it worked! Only thing was that by Friday she was saying she felt really fat like her stomach was huge, but I guess thats anxiety that goes with gaining weight. She wants to gain but the ed fear of becoming fat and unhealthy is still strong. 
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Faddywrite
edmom113 wrote:
Definitely still ED thinking! She should be able to enjoy an extra slice of cake at a birthday party without guilt. That being said, I wouldn't add refined sugar to her meal plan in extreme excess and this can cause her blood sugar to go a bit crazy. After her blood sugar spikes too much, it will crash and this I've found can cause ED thoughts to worsen. Make treats available and let her know that its okay to eat these things. Good luck!


Yes I agree I think maybe we used to let her eat a little too much sugar when she was around ten or eleven and she remembers that and is scared of going back there so we have reassured her that we won't go back to having too much cake etc!! But she managed two pancakes this week, one with just lemon and one with lemon and honey. Then she had a white bread egg sandwich (she thinks white bread is very unhealthy so scary, so we always eat wholemeal).The psychologist has asked her to have one "flex" day a week when she eats something like a pudding or cake and one 'semi-flex' when she follows this up with a less calorific treat like some biscuits. I feel we might actually be starting to see some reduced fear as she said she didn't feel guilty at all eating the pancakes. She is still trying desperately to keep within NHS amounts for sugar saturated fat etc but hoping as we work our way through fear foods that will reduce.
The thing that helped me to see how she thinks was when the psychologist drew a ladder and asked my daughter to write in order which foods scare her the most. Ice cream was almost off the scale!!!
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tina72
That is good news that she enjoyed pancakes! Now work on the rest and she will recover!
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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Ocras68
Tina there’s a language thing here.  “Off the scale” in this context means very bad, as in she feared ice cream so much it wasn’t even within the usual range.  Xx
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tina72
Thanks for explaining that, ocras68, I thought it was the opposite. I will change my post, thanks again for helping me to learn more every day!
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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