F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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roadtorecovery
So, I know it takes time for the brain to heal even when the child is at full weight.  It seems from reading this, some see a remarkable change in attitude once that "weight" is hit and for others it takes more time to see the change in state of mind.

So, my question is if you can feed a child back to health while not really pushing her fear foods until the brain is more fully healed?  She's eating, good calories, good nutrition but not eating a lot of her fear foods which are really just bread, sweets, cheese  and pasta.  Meat, veggies, fruits, yoghurt, whole grains etc are all in her diet on a daily basis.  

She still has a lot of anxiety with eating.  Often times she will have diarrhea after eating (she's not on laxatives-I've looked everywhere and even checked receipts from stores, searched high and low for any sign of them).  I really believe it is anxiety.  

She's gaining weight. Just wondering if we just let her for now eat foods she's happier with the aleviate some of the anxiety for her and then reintroduce them here and there rather than a "ripping off the bandaid" process of forcing foods every day.  
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debra18
There is no right answer to your question. You have to trust your instincts but not be afraid of challenging your daughter's eating disorder. I did find that fear foods were easier at a higher weight and in early days it was most important to get in the food and weight gain. Many fear foods my daughter chose herself at a higher weight. 
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scaredmom

Yes some get the weight up and then try to add in the fear foods and it is for sure a viable option. Just anecdotally,  I have seen people come back to tell their stories and many if not most, say that they wished they had started fear foods earlier rather than later.Because ED likes routines and safe foods, the longer it stays that way, the harder it is to extinguish.  You say she still has anxiety over eating currently, and this would be the same reaction with fear foods, I would think. If she were not fearful of what she is eating now, then the anxiety does not make sense at this time... I hope that was clear?.
Now Kartini does not use hyper palatable foods like sweets for refeeding, and it sounds a bit like what you are doing. Of course you may ladder foods in when you feel ready.
As for the diarrhea, has that been investigated as to cause? 

This thread came to mind with your question: 
https://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/anorexia-to-orthorexia-10161522?pid=1308835553

There is no right answer as debra18 says, just that one day they should be challenged over time to rid her of ED.
When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Foodsupport_AUS
I agree with Debra, there is no right way to this. We did it very slowly, in part because it was so hard to keep her eating at all. Slowly but surely as she has recovered she has expanded things, and we are back to all previous foods, plus some. I think it is important to remember as long as those fear foods are there the ED is there. Ultimately as long as those fear foods are there the ED is there, so it has to be challenged at some point, and I think it depends on age, severity of illness and thoughts and co-morbids. 
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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debra18
I did do some fear foods early on and it caused extreme anxiety and panic attacks. At a higher weight the fear foods were easier. That's why I said it may be good to wait. But some people do say the longer you wait the harder it is to do the fear foods.
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scaredmom
For us as all foods were really fear foods, we had no choice. And we introduced very early into the diagnosis things that she felt were "unhealthy". I did have a good team on the ground that would tell d that this week it was time for , donuts, or chocolate, or ice cream or pie nuts,et.. ( I would tell them ahead of time that was MY plan- and d always listened to authority that were not her parents at the beginning so I used that to my advantage against ED).
When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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roadtorecovery
I think we will probably go somewhere in the middle  Trying fear foods here and there and then when she's more brain recovered, push them more.  The doctor doesn't think there is anything to the loose stools.  I think it is anxiety.  There isn't any blood.  It's right after eating but she's also eating a lot of things that don't give you bulky stool either.  It's more formed the less fruit she eats...
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tina72
The big question will be does she have enough fats in her diet without fear food? We would not have a chance to hit the daily needed 100 g fats here without introducing fear food.
So if she has enough fats I think you could wait and if not, you need to introduce at least some fear food with fats.
30% of her daily calory intake should be fats to start brain recovery. At least.
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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