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amirak

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Reply with quote  #1 

It seemed so harmless at first...eating healthy foods, cutting down on sugar, and enjoying regular exercise. And, over time, shifted to something else. Only this summer did I (finally) become aware that my daughter has an eating disorder (and I still don't know how to refer to it - is she anorexic? does she 'have anorexia'? is there a different way to refer to it).

I'm seeking advice on first steps. The meal planning and supervision is especially confusing (I read the Kelty Clinic's advice for parents.

Here is what we've done so far:
- found a therapist for DD (one who specializes in eating disorders)
- have gone to family doctor
- have contacted local organization (Looking Glass Foundation) for help/support
- started planning dinners with daughter (ie, deciding what would be eaten for supper on what days)

But, I still don't know how to do deal with ensuring sufficient caloric intake and what specific behaviours to adopt.  

Any pointers would be most helpful. I'd really like someone I can actually talk with (not online) who can help me...a parent group or other.

Thank you.







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scaredmom

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Reply with quote  #2 

Hello amirak, 

Yes it does seem so harmless at the start, doesn't. That has happened to a lot of us too. 
I welcome you to the club, although it is sad that you needed to find us. You have already done so much! Here you will get a lot of support and information.
At this time, I would like to ask you a few questions that will help us to help you. 
1) where are you located?
2) Have you had a proper diagnosis of anorexia? (AN)

You will need to start re feeding and there are many ways to do that. Usually in Family Based therapy, (FBT) which is evidence based, parent feed the child
You need to keep her out of the kitchen. She needs to eat what you give her. 
Usually it is 3 meals and 2-3 snacks per  day. She may need a lot more calories than you ever thought. Please use the search button for "high calories snacks" "high calories" there are at least two. 

If she over exercises, you will need to get that to stop, in our case, completely, for my D to start to get better. 


It is really hard, I am sorry. We are here to help. Please ask all the questions you have. There are so many of us who have been there, in the real sense.
We can offer support and suggestions to you to get you started.
Others will be here very soon too. Keep posting,tell us what you need...
XXX

food +more food +time + love+ good professional help+ ATDT+ no exercise= healing---> recovery(---> life without ED)

Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #3 
Welcome and sorry that you have had to find your way here. 

Many of us have been drawn in by what initially appeared to be health seeking behaviours clearly becoming not healthy. 

If your daughter is 13 it would generally be recommended that the most appropriate treatment for an anorexia like illness is FBT - this requires you to be in charge of the re-feeding and not allowing your D to be involved in this. You then give responsibility for eating back to your D in phases 2 and 3 as she is getting better. Is the therapist you have found offering certified FBT?  Some eating disorder therapists work with the child alone, work on some vague form of talk therapy and looking for the "reason" she got sick. This is not what you need. Many families have found bad therapy is worse than no therapy at all. 

Although it seems as though working in collaboration with your D is the best way forward, most families find this does not work. The fear of gaining weight and eating anywhere near enough food to achieve weight sufficient weight gain gets in the way. 

I would suggest also looking through the FEAST family guides if you have not already along with this getting started on re-feeding guide . There is also a lot of information in the Hall of Fame 

__________________
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
scaredmom

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Reply with quote  #4 

Amirak, 
I see you are in Canada. I am too. In Ontario, there are local mental health services and most if not all, have eating disorder clinics that do practice proper FBT. 

If you are in Ontario, please look at CMHA in your area and make enquiries ASAP. They do take self referrals and you do not need a doctor. I find that the family MD's don't know anything about ED.
FBT is the gold standard for treatment.  In our area, the wait list is short 2 weeks or so for a child of 13. Adults is a few months. 



XXX

Torie

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Amirak - So sorry you needed to join us here.  

The thing I had trouble really grasping is this:  Your main goal in life (for now) is making sure your d regains the weight she has lost (all of it), and nothing else really matters.  If she is utterly miserable, says she hates you, can't go to school, doesn't care about having friends, etc. - that is all completely secondary.  In order to fix all those things, the weight must go on.

It is so very scary and hard for them to eat enough.  One thing that helps a lot is to pack in the calories into the smallest possible footprint - it takes a veritable mountain of broccoli to equal a single caloric muffin.  So in this upside down world, fruits and especially veggies take a back seat.  I was surprised to learn (here) that you can add a lot of canola oil (rapeseed in UK) to everything from soups and smoothies to rice and yogurt.  If you stir in in briskly, it will disappear without changing the texture of flavor.  You can experiment to see how much you can add.

When they lose weight, the brain actually shrinks.  (You can see that on an MRI.)  She needs lots and lots of fats to rebuild and heal her brain as the brain is made up largely of fats.  It's almost always "easiest" for them if you can keep them out of the kitchen while you are preparing meals and snacks, and if she asks about ingredients, just tell her you know exactly what she needs, and that's what is in there.  If she persists, you can say that you don't discuss ingredients.

What helped me most was this video by forum member Eva Musby:


Please feel free to ask all the questions you like. xx

-Torie


__________________
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
amirak

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you scaredmom.

In response to your questions:
1) I am in Vancouver, Canada.
2) I have not had a proper diagnosis of AN for my daughter (we are back at the family doc on Friday and am hoping D can be referred to the eating disorder clinic at local hospital).

Until today, I had not heard of Family Based therapy. 

I will keep posting. 

Thank you for your quick reply. 
What is ATDT (in your signature)?

amirak

Quote:
Originally Posted by scaredmom

Hello amirak, 

Yes it does seem so harmless at the start, doesn't. That has happened to a lot of us too. 
I welcome you to the club, although it is sad that you needed to find us. You have already done so much! Here you will get a lot of support and information.
At this time, I would like to ask you a few questions that will help us to help you. 
1) where are you located?
2) Have you had a proper diagnosis of anorexia? (AN)

You will need to start re feeding and there are many ways to do that. Usually in Family Based therapy, (FBT) which is evidence based, parent feed the child
You need to keep her out of the kitchen. She needs to eat what you give her. 
Usually it is 3 meals and 2-3 snacks per  day. She may need a lot more calories than you ever thought. Please use the search button for "high calories snacks" "high calories" there are at least two. 

If she over exercises, you will need to get that to stop, in our case, completely, for my D to start to get better. 


It is really hard, I am sorry. We are here to help. Please ask all the questions you have. There are so many of us who have been there, in the real sense.
We can offer support and suggestions to you to get you started.
Others will be here very soon too. Keep posting,tell us what you need...
XXX

food +more food +time + love+ good professional help+ ATDT+ no exercise= healing---> recovery(---> life without ED)


__________________
Canada
amirak

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you Foodsupport_AUS.
I had not heard of FBT until today and had no idea that there were therapists certified in FBT. Agree that bad therapy is worse than no therapy. 

Thank you for the links to the resources. I will be reading these.

With gratitude.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foodsupport_AUS
Welcome and sorry that you have had to find your way here. 

Many of us have been drawn in by what initially appeared to be health seeking behaviours clearly becoming not healthy. 

If your daughter is 13 it would generally be recommended that the most appropriate treatment for an anorexia like illness is FBT - this requires you to be in charge of the re-feeding and not allowing your D to be involved in this. You then give responsibility for eating back to your D in phases 2 and 3 as she is getting better. Is the therapist you have found offering certified FBT?  Some eating disorder therapists work with the child alone, work on some vague form of talk therapy and looking for the "reason" she got sick. This is not what you need. Many families have found bad therapy is worse than no therapy at all. 

Although it seems as though working in collaboration with your D is the best way forward, most families find this does not work. The fear of gaining weight and eating anywhere near enough food to achieve weight sufficient weight gain gets in the way. 

I would suggest also looking through the FEAST family guides if you have not already along with this getting started on re-feeding guide . There is also a lot of information in the Hall of Fame 

__________________
Canada
amirak

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #8 
Thank you for your kind words and the link to the video. I am finding it so hard to see how quickly our (my D and I's) relationship is changing (and will need to change further).

I will watch the video and explore the links.

With much gratitude,
amirak

Quote:
Originally Posted by Torie
Hi Amirak - So sorry you needed to join us here.  

The thing I had trouble really grasping is this:  Your main goal in life (for now) is making sure your d regains the weight she has lost (all of it), and nothing else really matters.  If she is utterly miserable, says she hates you, can't go to school, doesn't care about having friends, etc. - that is all completely secondary.  In order to fix all those things, the weight must go on.

It is so very scary and hard for them to eat enough.  One thing that helps a lot is to pack in the calories into the smallest possible footprint - it takes a veritable mountain of broccoli to equal a single caloric muffin.  So in this upside down world, fruits and especially veggies take a back seat.  I was surprised to learn (here) that you can add a lot of canola oil (rapeseed in UK) to everything from soups and smoothies to rice and yogurt.  If you stir in in briskly, it will disappear without changing the texture of flavor.  You can experiment to see how much you can add.

When they lose weight, the brain actually shrinks.  (You can see that on an MRI.)  She needs lots and lots of fats to rebuild and heal her brain as the brain is made up largely of fats.  It's almost always "easiest" for them if you can keep them out of the kitchen while you are preparing meals and snacks, and if she asks about ingredients, just tell her you know exactly what she needs, and that's what is in there.  If she persists, you can say that you don't discuss ingredients.

What helped me most was this video by forum member Eva Musby:


Please feel free to ask all the questions you like. xx

-Torie


__________________
Canada
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #9 
ATDT is this forum - Around the Dinner Table [smile]
__________________
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
Torie

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Reply with quote  #10 
FBT = Family Based Treatment (sometimes called Family Based Therapy).

Not to be confused with Family Therapy, which is not what you want. xx

-Torie

__________________
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
Mamaroo

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Reply with quote  #11 
Welcome from me as well. 

Torie has given you a great link to a video. Eva also has a brilliant book to help you getting your d to eat. Here is the link:
https://anorexiafamily.com/

Here is some information on family based therapy.

From  https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-family-based-treatment-fbt-for-eating-disorders-4052371:

"Principles of FBT

FBT takes an agnostic view of the eating disorder, meaning therapists do not try to analyze why the eating disorder developed. FBT does not blame families for the disorder. On the contrary, it presumes the powerful bond between parents and child and empowers the parents to use their love to help their child. Parents are viewed as experts on their child, an essential part of the solution, and members of the treatment team.
In FBT, the eating disorder is viewed as an external force that is possessing the child. Parents are asked to join with the healthy part of the child against the eating disorder which is threatening to take their child away. Full nutrition is viewed as a critical first step in recovery; the role of parents is to provide this nutrition by actively feeding their child.
FBT sessions usually involve the entire family and include at least one family meal in the therapist’s office. This gives the therapist an opportunity to observe the behaviors of different family members during a meal and to coach the parents to help their child eat. Because patients with eating disorders may present with medical complications, they should be monitored by a physician during the course of treatment."

"Phase 1: Full parental control.
 Parents are usually in complete charge of meals as they help their child to reestablish regular patterns of eating and interrupt problematic eating disorder behaviors such as bingeing, purging, and overexercise. If weight gain is indicated, the goal is 1 to 2 pounds per week. The therapist works to empower the parents to take on these tasks and helps the parents learn to manage the child at mealtimes."

There are two more phases, but the experienced parents here have found that phase 1 should last a lot longer than the therapists advise, usually at least 1 year post weight restoration (WR). 


__________________
D became obsessed with exercise at age 9. Started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. She is back to her old happy self and can eat anything put in front of her. Now working on intuitive eating.
scaredmom

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Reply with quote  #12 

I hope your family MD refers you soon to the BC Children's Hospital eating clinic.They are good!

Ensure that your family MD does Blood pressures first lying down then after 5-10 min Blood pressure and heart rate for both, standing up for a few minutes. If there is a significant drop ie about 10 mm of Hg, in the systolic BP, or increase in HR above 10 beats per min, then she is medically unstable and may need to be admitted to hospital. This information and her behaviours should be documented in the referral so that she can be triaged appropriately. The more red flags the quicker she may be seen.

I don't wish to scare you, I just want you to have your eyes and ears wide open so that the correct things are done for your child. A Low heart rate is NOT normal. It is a sign of cardiac instability and needs to be taken seriously.So if the doc says it is good just say NO.
Here are some guidelines to get more info. 
http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng69
 
What is she eating now? Do you have a height and weight? How much has she dropped from her normal curve ie percentiles for height and weight.  My D is 13 now and was diagnosed at 11. We had to get to 4500 cal per day. 

Is she over exercising? You will likely need to stop it altogether and even stop gym and all sports.
 
XXX

 

sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi there...I am originally from Vancouver, Canada & don't live too far away.  I'd be happy to chat with you on the phone, or even to arrange a meet up if you would like.

You can connect with me via email at daryl@feast-ed.org

Warmly,
sk8r31

__________________
It is good to not only hope to be successful, but to expect it and accept it--Maya Angelou
mumofone

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Reply with quote  #14 
Welcome, you are in the right place. I am new to All This too and my daughter started with healthy changes which for out of control.
This forum really helped me to feel that I wasn’t alone and what my daughter was going through was just her illness and her behaviours were similar to those detailed on this forum. You appear to be doing all the right things but I would say you plan the meals and tell her what she is eating. And calorie load! It’s really bizarre but fruit and veg do take a back seat now and it’s all about getting as many calories in the most normal looking portion of food (my d couldn’t cope with big portions)
Good luck, thinking of you x
amirak

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thank you for the terminology clarification...! Need to get this straight.
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amirak

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thank you! Today, inspired by the caring replies, I 'snuck in' as much extra oil as I could get away with...to calorie load. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mumofone
Welcome, you are in the right place. I am new to All This too and my daughter started with healthy changes which for out of control.
This forum really helped me to feel that I wasn’t alone and what my daughter was going through was just her illness and her behaviours were similar to those detailed on this forum. You appear to be doing all the right things but I would say you plan the meals and tell her what she is eating. And calorie load! It’s really bizarre but fruit and veg do take a back seat now and it’s all about getting as many calories in the most normal looking portion of food (my d couldn’t cope with big portions)
Good luck, thinking of you x

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amirak

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amirak
Thank you all for the terminology and abbreviation clarification...! Need to get this straight.

__________________
Canada
amirak

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Reply with quote  #18 
Thank you for this additional info . We're going to the family doc on Friday and I'll ask that the blood pressure be done in both lying and standing. Will read the info at the link. 

Don't have weight (no scale in the home and we've never had one). Can get height.

Foods: mainly fruit and veggies, but some lentils and beans. No milk, no cheese. Small portions. Almost no carbs in the form of breads, muffins, bagels. 

She's freezing all the time. She's not over exercising but definitely exercise is playing into this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by scaredmom

I hope your family MD refers you soon to the BC Children's Hospital eating clinic.They are good!

Ensure that your family MD does Blood pressures first lying down then after 5-10 min Blood pressure and heart rate for both, standing up for a few minutes. If there is a significant drop ie about 10 mm of Hg, in the systolic BP, or increase in HR above 10 beats per min, then she is medically unstable and may need to be admitted to hospital. This information and her behaviours should be documented in the referral so that she can be triaged appropriately. The more red flags the quicker she may be seen.

I don't wish to scare you, I just want you to have your eyes and ears wide open so that the correct things are done for your child. A Low heart rate is NOT normal. It is a sign of cardiac instability and needs to be taken seriously.So if the doc says it is good just say NO.
Here are some guidelines to get more info. 
http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng69
 
What is she eating now? Do you have a height and weight? How much has she dropped from her normal curve ie percentiles for height and weight.  My D is 13 now and was diagnosed at 11. We had to get to 4500 cal per day. 

Is she over exercising? You will likely need to stop it altogether and even stop gym and all sports.
 
XXX

 


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Canada
amirak

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #19 
Thank you mamaroo. I am so appreciative of the information you've sent my way. Too tired to read now, but will read this tomorrow. I am hanging on to the words in your signature "back to her happy self".  


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamaroo
Welcome from me as well. 

Torie has given you a great link to a video. Eva also has a brilliant book to help you getting your d to eat. Here is the link:
https://anorexiafamily.com/

Here is some information on family based therapy.

From  https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-family-based-treatment-fbt-for-eating-disorders-4052371:

"Principles of FBT

FBT takes an agnostic view of the eating disorder, meaning therapists do not try to analyze why the eating disorder developed. FBT does not blame families for the disorder. On the contrary, it presumes the powerful bond between parents and child and empowers the parents to use their love to help their child. Parents are viewed as experts on their child, an essential part of the solution, and members of the treatment team.
In FBT, the eating disorder is viewed as an external force that is possessing the child. Parents are asked to join with the healthy part of the child against the eating disorder which is threatening to take their child away. Full nutrition is viewed as a critical first step in recovery; the role of parents is to provide this nutrition by actively feeding their child.
FBT sessions usually involve the entire family and include at least one family meal in the therapist’s office. This gives the therapist an opportunity to observe the behaviors of different family members during a meal and to coach the parents to help their child eat. Because patients with eating disorders may present with medical complications, they should be monitored by a physician during the course of treatment."

"Phase 1: Full parental control.
 Parents are usually in complete charge of meals as they help their child to reestablish regular patterns of eating and interrupt problematic eating disorder behaviors such as bingeing, purging, and overexercise. If weight gain is indicated, the goal is 1 to 2 pounds per week. The therapist works to empower the parents to take on these tasks and helps the parents learn to manage the child at mealtimes."

There are two more phases, but the experienced parents here have found that phase 1 should last a lot longer than the therapists advise, usually at least 1 year post weight restoration (WR). 


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Canada
Torie

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amirak
Thank you for this additional info . We're going to the family doc on Friday and I'll ask that the blood pressure be done in both lying and standing. Will read the info at the link. 


It is called orthostatic blood pressure.  I don't think my d's doc knew how to do this (for sure the school nurse didn't) so here's a sheet you could print with the specifics:
https://www.cdc.gov/steadi/pdf/Measuring_Orthostatic_Blood_Pressure-print.pdforieo

(This is the US CDC, which is the Centers for Disease Control - very much respected here in the US and I'm sure considered reputable source in Canada.)

Please keep us posted. xx

-Torie

__________________
"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
deenl

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi amirak,

And welcome to the forum.

This website has a very handy checklist of warning signs. You can fill it out, print it and bring it along to your doctor.

Please do not accept a wait and see approach. Parental supervision and support can be used even in the earliest stages. Please see this blog post.

Wishing you strength and courage,

D

__________________
2015 12yo son restricting but no body image issues, no fat phobia; lost weight IP! Oct 2015 home, stable but no progress. Medical hosp to kick start recovery Feb 2016. Slowly and cautiously gaining weight at home and seeing signs of our real kid.

May 2017 Hovering around WR. Mood great, mostly. Building up hour by hour at school after 18 months at home. Summer 2017 Happy, first trip away in years, tons of variety in food, stepping back into social life. Sept 2017, back to school full time for the first time in 2 years. Happy and relaxed, just usual non ED hassles. 

  • Swedish proverb: Love me when I least deserve it because that's when I need it most.
  • We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence Recovery, then, is not an act but a habit. Aristotle.
  • If the plan doesn't work, change the plan but never the goal. (but don't give up on the plan too soon, maybe it just needs a tweak or a bit more time and determination [wink] )
  • We cannot control the wind but we can direct the sail.
sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #22 
Also wanted to send you the link to the Kelty Centre's info on eating disorders.  They are part of BC Children's Hospital in Vancouver and may be where you are referred to.  There is a lot of good info available through the link, including videos on meal support.

Knowledge is power, and arming yourself with as much info as you can before your gp's appointment on Friday is important.

Hang in there, and continue to add to your d's meals as best you can in the meantime.

Sending warm support,
sk8r31

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It is good to not only hope to be successful, but to expect it and accept it--Maya Angelou
Ocras68

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Reply with quote  #23 
How are things going? Psychological therapy is futile until your daughter is weight restored, as her brain will be incapable of dealing with anything except calorie deficit at the moment. Family Based Therapy is the way forward - first weight restoration, then dealing with the disordered thinking. I would definitely recommend Eva Musby’s book, it’s a beacon of realistic hope and sensible advice. My daughter started off like yours; the anorexia crept up so quietly we didn’t realise it was there until it had taken hold.

Wishing you love and strength.
silali

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Reply with quote  #24 
Hi Amirak,

I am sorry to hear about your 13 year old daughter,
I really feel you pain, my daughter was also 13 when she got ill last year
She started healthy eating end of July, took her to the doctor end of September and by Mid November she went to hospital for 4 weeks  
11 months on we are in a much better place, not out of the woods yet but definitely much better.

Food (lots of), love FBT, books, this forum, lots of strength, courage and team work with your partner and extended family (especially people make your daughter happy) , this is your recipe to recovery.
Can you take time off work? take it, as much as you can    

You will soon discover for certain if Anorexia has already got hold of your daughter.
As soon as you start challenging it, trying to feed your daughter to health, the illness will show its true colors and is not going to be easy! 
Its going to hard and painful and I am telling you this because you need to prepare for it!
It is like grabbing a bull by its horns, it will start kicking and shaking it head with such strength it will shock you.   

When I started reading about Anorexia and FBT I decided I wanted to squash the illnesses out of my daughter quick and hard!!
My beautiful young daughter was fading away quickly day by day, hour by hour. 
It was so horrible to watch her in disparate, lost and frightened.   

As I said as soon as we started to feed our daughter mid October things really started to go down ill. She lost 1kg a week until she was hospitalized on the 13th of November 2017. From July to November she had lost 10 kg

During the 4 weeks in hospital she made a modest weight gain of about 1.5kg. Once at home doctors were suggesting a weight gain of max 500grm a week.
I had no intention of going at that slow! Once at home she gained on average 1 kg a week (with no loss weight over xmas) and I did too!
She had restored weight by Mid February. 
It was hard!!
It was hard on everyone in the family!!
3 meals, 3 snacks would take all day.
LOts of tears, kicks, punches, swear words, you name it! 

I took the role of the bad cop, I was preparing the food and my husband was very good at talking to her.
He kind helped her to make sense of all the fears and feelings she had.
He was very good at making her see (while her logical thinking was nonexistent) that was the Anorexia that stooped her from dancing (the love of her life) and making her feel so horrible, not the food.
He literally repeated the same things over and over every single meal and snack. 
In some books they refer to it as the "Dolphin Approach" you kind of give them a little push in the right direction.  

WE also used our daughter's "love for dance" to drive her recovery.
THere would not be dance in her life unless she ate the food and regained weight.
We didn't use it as a threat but with compassion we explained her without food she would not have the strength to dance. 
Her dance teacher (who she loves and think very highly of) was very important in her recovery. 
Our Eating Disorders Mental health team was of great help too. 
My sister was very good at stroking her hand and making her relaxed.

Slowly but surely she gained weight and as she did her mood and logical thinking improved and we could talk to her and start to set little goals which drove her even closer to recovery 

Now she is back dance studio and she knows if she doesn't eat or loose weight she will be pulled out from it.
She is happier and socially getting better.
She still has body image issues ( she cant look at her belly) and although she is responsible for her lunches at school and on Saturdays I would say I am still 70% in charge of her food. 
She has decided she wants to be able to dance and she is happy for me to make sure she feeds herself properly by being in charge. 
I hope things will be better again in 12 months time! 😉 

So Amarik, what i am trying to say to you is that .....there is light at the end of the tunnel but you need to hang on in there for the next few months!!

You are not alone and on this forum there is always someone listening to you, day and night, do not hesitate to ask for help or comfort!!

wish you all the best x       

 
scaredmom

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Reply with quote  #25 

silali, 

How lovely to hear that your D is doing so well! You and H sound like a fantastic team. 
I am glad you posted. I love these stories, as in the beginning it is so hard to believe things get better. So to hear that things do get better from so many people really aids to crystalise it- IT DOES GET BETTER one bite at a time
XXX
 Food+ more food+ time + love+ good professional help + ATDT+ no exercise= healing ---> recovery (--> Life without ED)

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