F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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cm72
My 12 yr old AN daughter is eating great. She's gaining weight at a steady pace and is eating everything we put in front of her. No problems at all. But as of late, she is having times where she will eat large amounts at one sitting. She says she does this when she's bored. No purging going on and she's not losing weight. It scares her quite a bit when it happens and of course, she gets stomachaches afterwards.
I know this can be a normal part of the process but I want to know what I should do or say when it happens. Should I try to stop it?
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ValentinaGermania
If it is a bit more than normal portions and you see her enjoying the eating I would not stop it.
If it is really MUCH more and she gets stomach ache afterwards I would think how you could stop it without making her feel you think she eats too much.
For example, if she binges on crisps you could give her a limited portion and fake that you have no more (lock away the rest).
As you say, binging is normal for many patients at the end of ED recovery and it may be only a phase but there is a risk that she starts purging when she eats so much that the urge to vomit is there so keep an eye on it.

When she says she eats because she feels bored, can you ask her to tell you when she feels bored so you can give her some distraction?
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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cm72
Unfortunately this often happens when i'm not at home. She is at home alone with her sister for about an hour after school. 
I think I will try to portion our her serving of the "yummy" food and lock away the rest until I get home.
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Enn

I actually feel this is normal. When I was a kid I had a big snack some would call ,maybe a binge after school, I don’t know. 

If you don’t see it how would you know if it truly is too much. ‘too much’ being a relative term for those with ED.

And I don’t think I would be worried. I think that is normal to do. And sometimes we all eat a bit more and our tummies ache a bit and that is also normal.

i am sorry cm72, I am not understanding why this may  a ‘bad’ thing.
Her feelings of being scared worry me more.  What is she scared of? Maybe telling her it is normal may help. Is she feeling guilty and why? I think I would work on the psychology and not the behaviour.That is what i am thinking with what you have written. I may have missed a key worry of yours and I apologize if my note to you is off the mark.

🌱

When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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PurpleRain
I agree that it could be normal, my D did it for a while with Nutella and PB, i was a bit on my toes because I had read about AN easily morphed into bingeing and purging, but it wasn't really a binge, just her eating a lot (but not HUGHE amounts). I'm with Enn about the feelings being more worrisome. if she is scared of eating too much (unless it's really a binge) and maybe felling guilty, that could end up in purging or restricting again. Try to determine how much is being eaten,ask sister casually? Ask her directly how much she thinks is too much and reassure her that is normal (if it is)? Or as Tina says portion things, it may help you to know how much is too much (if you have a couple of mid size crisps, and there is still half you know it's not too much for example, or if it's ice cream, take a look at how much is there when you leave the house and how much when you come back). Just ideas I hope some would help
13 yo d started to eat "healthy" September 2018, she had a growth spurt a bit later, followed by tummy bug. She started restricting breakfast and school lunch in January 2019 (that we know). We succesfully refed at home.
I have found inner strenght, patience and compassion that I did not know I had.
Never retreat, never surrender
keep feeding
 
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cm72
Thank you.Those were some good ideas.
I think what happens is she will eat say crackers and peanut butter. Then she has a granola bar. Then a whole pack of cookies. Etc, etc.
She gets scared that she can't stop when things taste good. I try to reassure her that it is normal and these things happen. I'll keep working on her not being scared of the times she overeats. I too get nervous that if she continues to be scared, it may go in another direction.
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MKR
How about making sure she has a good regular (larger, if necessary) varied meal prior?  To leave less room after?

My kids usually try to raid the pantry if dinner is so much as 5 minutes behind, particularly if they can smell the cooking. Have resorted to freezing in advance and quickly reheating.
Mum's Kitchen

14-y-o "healthy living" led to AN in 2017 and WR at 16. Current muscle dysmorphia.
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cm72
I'm thinking she needs even more food than she's having earlier in the day. I think i'll start packing an extra granola bar or something in her backpack.
She just texted me saying she ate her lunch today PLUS had a sandwich someone shared and she's still hungry. Perhaps a growth spurt is coming up.
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Enn
I think giving her more food is very wise!
🌱
When within yourself you find the road, the right road will open.  (Dejan Stojanovic)

Food+more food+time+love+good professional help+ATDT+no exercise+ state not just weight+/- the "right" medicine= healing---> recovery(--->life without ED)
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Foodsupport_AUS
I agree with the idea of feeding her early in the day. It sounds like she is hungry when home and then eats more snack foods when home. When binge eating occurs in binge eating disorder it is also commonly associated with restriction and hunger can lead to an urge to overeat. Perhaps eating more early in the day and even perhaps having a particular snack ready for her when she gets home could help her feel that she is responding better to her hunger. This is tough when she has had just restriction in the past but there are true risks of cross over in eating disorder types -feeling guilty for eating is unhelpful and of course can lead to compensatory behaviours.
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13. Initially weight restored 2012. Relapse and continuously edging towards recovery. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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