F.E.A.S.T's Around The Dinner Table forum

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Mamaroo
I found this article on a Swedish method of treating anorexia:

https://www.technologynetworks.com/informatics/news/the-app-teaching-anorexics-to-eat-again-320648

They consider the illness just as an eating disorder and not a mental illness. They treat AN by normalising eating behaviour. What was interesting for me about the article was that they considered excessive exercise due to dieting to be hard wired in the brain. Here are some quotes:

"The approach is based on the theory that slow eating and excessive physical exertion, both hallmarks of anorexia, are evolutionarily conserved responses to short food supply that can be triggered by dieting - and reversed by practicing normal eating."

' "This new perspective is not so new: nearly 40 years ago, it was realized that the conspicuous high physical activity of anorexia is a normal, evolutionarily conserved response - i.e., foraging for food when it is in short supply - that can be triggered dietary restriction.

"In striking similarity to human anorexics, rats and mice given food only once a day begin to increase their running activity and decrease their food intake further to the point at which they lose a great deal of body weight and can eventually die."

"More recently, the theory has been elaborated and validated by studies of brain function."

"We find that chemical signaling in the starved brain supports the search for food, rather than eating itself," reports Sodersten.'

D became obsessed with exercise at age 9 and started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. View my recipes on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLW6A6sDO3ZDq8npNm8_ww
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Foodsupport_AUS
Mandometer treatment is an interesting treatment method. Unfortunately Bergh and Sodersten have not looked always had good communication with other researchers, so trying to sort out the wood for the trees with Mandometer is really hard. Science of ED's was not overly impressed when they looked at a number of papers but it is really hard to tease out if there is any merit to this method or it really is truly snake oil. 

https://www.scienceofeds.org/2013/12/24/the-finest-quality-snake-oil-mandometerr-treatment-for-eating-disorders-part-i/
D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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tina72
Mamaroo wrote:
"We find that chemical signaling in the starved brain supports the search for food, rather than eating itself," reports Sodersten.'


That fits a lot with Shan Guisingers "adapt to flee famine theorie". For evolution the surviving of the group is more important that the surviving of an individual. So if the AN person in that group is still able to search for food over great distances although starving to death that is evolutionary a win.
Keep feeding. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
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Mamaroo
I think any method which promotes weight gain and normalised eating habits can't be too bad, but I understand the difficulty in research papers to compare their method to other, more known methods. It's like trying to compare Big W with IKEA.

I just liked this article, because like Tina said, it explains excessive exercise in terms of evolutionary behaviours. The way they treat exercise is to place the patient in a heated room, which reduces the compulsion. When we just started refeeding, a friend suggested I keep her warm and toasty, so I moved her into our spare bedroom, which is a cosy room, and I had the heater on permanently. The amount of exercise my d did, was reduced dramatically. Could be the heat, could've been something else, but seeing that so many here struggle with compulsive exercise, keeping them warm is another tool in fighting the exercise impulse.
D became obsessed with exercise at age 9 and started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for months on Ensures alone, followed by swap over with food at a snails pace. WR after a year at age 11 in March 2017. View my recipes on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLW6A6sDO3ZDq8npNm8_ww
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