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kazi67

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Posts: 107
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi
My 19 yo d isn’t WR yet (according to her she is) she is distressed as she has started having feelings of being out of control and eating a lot after her meals
(I’m not that worried, I’m sure you all get that after going through the original refeeding dramas I’m glad she is eating) but for her it is causing her a lot of concern and she gets very upset after
I’m worried she will start vomitting but I don’t think she is atm
This has been happening for the past few weeks now, I want to help her but dont know how, possibly needs anti depressants? But is only upset after the “binges”
I think perhaps this might be a good time for her to see a dietician but of course she just tells me “they will tell me to stick to the meal plan blah blah blah”
I dont know if anyone has suggestions or can help, I wasn’t going to post as I know most are struggling to get their kids to eat but just thought someone might have experience with this
I’m guessing it’s her body craving the food it needs? Ive suggested upping her protein serve, Ive mentioned to her that her body has a lot of healing/growing to do
I guess it’s just part of the process?
So confusing for her, and hate to see her struggle
I Keep reminding her to push through
Mamaroo

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Kazi

Overeating after restricting is unfortunately very common. Even the men in the Minnesota Semi-Starvation experiment experienced this. The way we handled it was to stick with the meal plan, she ate 6 meals a day at regular intervals, loaded with protein and fat. We were cautioned to ensure she didn't overeat at any one meal, because of the concern that anorexia would turn into bulimia.

I think any medication to lessen the anxiety would help. My d wasn't on any prescription meds, but found great relieve form anxiety by taking Nature' Own EQ Control, which is available at most chemists.

Best of luck and sending you plenty of hugs!

__________________
D became obsessed with exercise at age 9. Started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for a year and WR at age 11 in March 2017. She is back to her old happy self and can eat anything put in front of her. Now working on intuitive eating.
kazi67

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Posts: 107
Reply with quote  #3 
Thankyou so much Mamaroo! :)
I’ll get down to the chemist ASAP and hope the supplements will help her, I just feel like I’m going crazy half the time and I know she needs to get more weight on, this is the hard part about her being 19, just got to try and encourage her all the time and having that info about the experiment and to let her know the “over eating” happened to them too is good as she thought she was going crazy too
Hating herself for doing it but not able to control it
So we/her feels a bit better and d has said she will try stick to her plan and she has agreed to increase her meal sizes (2 rounds of sandwiches instead of one) yay!!
It does make you feel better (sort of lol) to know your not alone
Thanks so much again your support is really helpful and I do appreciate it so much
x
melangell

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Reply with quote  #4 
It seems counter-intuitive to help stop them eating between meals when you've put so much effort into getting them to eat at all, but the risk of anorexia morphing into bulimia is real. I know some people say let them just eat whenever they want, but getting out of control with food can't be good. Mamaroo had excellent advice and it's great that your daughter has agreed to increase her meal sizes. Having her drink water, chew gum, suck lozenges, may help, and definitely anything you can introduce to help with reducing anxiety, like natural remedies, meditation, distraction, etc, is great. All the best to you and your daughter!
tina72

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi kazi67,
I would follow Mamaroos advice, too, try to increase portions a bit and she should eat at least every 4-5 hours to keep her blood sugar level constant. Or shorten it to every 3 hours and put a little extra snack in between.
Try to look what causes the binging. Sometimes it is very high glycemic food that pushes the blood sugar level high in a short time which causes the binging.
Many AN patients fear that they cannot stop eating. My d, too. We buy everything in portion sizes at the moment so that she knows what a normal portion is. That helps a bit.
Tina72
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #6 
Kazi it is very common for there to be a sense of binging as a part of recovery. Since your D is a participant in her recovery it may be worth introducing her to Tabitha Farrar's blog. She has this to say about binging in recovery. http://tabithafarrar.com/2017/02/recovery-binges-not-end-world/

Tabitha now recovered has done a lot of work with recovery coaching and used FEAST for information for herself for recovery. 

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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
kazi67

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Posts: 107
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks so much everyone for the great suggestions and support, we will definately try everything you have all said, my d does go onto Tabithas blog it’s really helpful too :) I was quite proud of her as she found this herself
I nearly deleted my post thinking I should be happy she is eating (and I am)but she has been so very distressed that I thought I’ll just ask as so many lovely parents always willing to help and we really don’t want the whole binge then vomit and restrict cycle starting
7 months ago I didn’t think I’d be worried about her eating
All agree it’s a horrible illness!!
x



Torie

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Reply with quote  #8 
You are probably already doing this, but it's important to have a good mix of fat, protein, and carbs in each meal and snack.  For some reason, lack of balance can increase the urge to binge.

Your d's body has been desperate for more nutrition, and now ED is getting weaker so your real d is able to feel her body signals better.  

I suspect that it is okay for her to "binge" in this way as long as she doesn't purge.  Can you keep her with you for at least an hour after every meal / snack?

Please don't worry about posting all along the way to recovery - people need to know what is possible along the journey.  

Keep up the good work! xx

-Torie

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"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
tina72

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Reply with quote  #9 
"I nearly deleted my post thinking I should be happy she is eating"
Please do not even think about something like that.
These questions are important. If only one parent in the world has the same problem and can find help because you asked it?
I think you are really happy that she is eating [wink]
Recovery is no switch to turn. It is a long road and it is not just starting to eat again.
So please keep asking. These questions are important.
Tina72
wheresmywand

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Kazi,

You've been given great advice above and it sounds like you're doing such an amazing job and have really good communication with your daughter, I get the sense you are united on working through this blip.

Just wanted to say I'm so glad you didn't delete your post, it means a lot to the rest of us who are reading a lot here, getting ideas - and also to see how our friends are going. I appreciate you being present on the forum and allowing others to respond lets us read and store this information for when we may come to it ourselves.
It is definitely harder when our kids are older/have a measure of independence and I think you're doing an incredible job.
xx

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17 yr old daughter dx RAN Jan 16, but starting restricting some months before that. Let go too early and now back home gaining weight again, slowly challenging fear foods and entrenched 'healthy, pure' eating habits and behaviours.
kazi67

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Posts: 107
Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks everyone for your lovely comments, helpful suggestions and encouragement!
So good to not feel alone, my d is doing incredibly well but this “blip” was getting very worrying and just seeing her so upset about it was obviously scarey as I didn’t want her to go backwards
She is doing the 2 steps forward 1 step back dance
You have all given me strength and confidence to continue and yes one of the reasons I didn’t delete my post was thinking hopefully I’m not the only one with this problem and it may help others so thanks again you are all AWESOME!! xx

AUSSIEedfamily

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Reply with quote  #12 
Dear kazi67,

Distraction activities might help. Ones that take her mind off the thoughts feelings. Distress tolerance techniques might also help, some of the DBT stuff might help.

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