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Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, I am so glad I found this forum.

We live near Washington DC.   Son just turned 13.   As a young child he was always 40th %ile for height and 25th %ile for weight.   Finicky eater -- liked things "just so" but had a decent appetite and did eat.

Around about age 8 things changed slowly, gradually.   He decided to become a vegetarian.  At first he just cut out meat that looked like meat (chicken legs, pork chops, fish with bones, ribs) but kept on eating fish sticks, fish (if no bones) chicken nuggets, pepperoni and such.   Over the next two years he gradually dropped all meat.   He hated the taste of eggs so never ate it.  He continued eating a small but acceptable variety of other foods.   His main source of nutrition was milk and dairy products, and cereal.   He would eat tofu and beans, but only a few and only if they were made just so (which was hard for me to replicate)  He was very fussy eater.   I refused to be a "short order" cook and cater to his every whim.   I made the meal for the family and made sure there was a vegetarian component for him, but if he didn't like that he could get his own food.   He usually was too lazy to do that, and just did without.

Around age 10 at his Dr visit they noted that he had barely gained any weight and dropped to the 10th percentile for weight.   His height remained 40th %ile so the doctor wasn't too worried; said that was probably just the way he was genetically intended to be.  She quizzed him about his eating habits but it seemed like he was eating an acceptable variety of foods.   She didn't understand about how restricted his eating was getting.   Many times I would see him look longingly at a roast chicken and say "I wish I could have that!" or just ask for one nibble.  I would cut him a slice and he would eat a tiny bit and then not eat any more.

I tried to encourage him to eat more for the next two years and to expand his willingness to try new foods and be able to deal with less than perfect foods.   It was very complicated -- he would only like a few foods from certain restaurants, all of which were 30 minutes away from my house so it wasn't an easy thing to pick them up.   Not that I had the time or interest or money to be able to do so.   My feeling was he had to learn how to eat the food that the rest of the family was eating, or he could do without -- soon enough, he'd eat when he was hungry.   Right?    He became more and more picky, completely cut out ALL meat from his diet, and developed what I call a toddler appetite.   He still ate what looked on paper like an acceptable variety of foods (all the beige foods like rice, noodles, pasta, bread, plus beans (from his favorite restaurant) minestrone soup (one brand only), broccoli (cooked one certain way only), tofu (stir fried in a  certain sauce, marinated first to be mushy on the inside, fried to be crispy on the outside) sushi (avocado only), and peanut butter.   But the portions he ate were so, so small.  

He mostly survived on milk and cheese, but no eggs and absolutely no meat.  He would snack mindlessly on a few foods like popcorn and Goldfish crackers, and popsicles.  I started limiting these foods because they had no nutritional value (empty calories) and I also limited milk; I was hoping that if he didn't fill up on the empty calories and milk, he'd have more appetite for the meals I was cooking (tofu, beans, vegetables, nuts and healthy grains.)   It didn't work; his appetite didn't increase.

He continued to drop on his weight curve to about 8th %ile, while maintaining his height at 40th %ile.  His doctor still wasn't too concerned as she quizzed him about his meals and he seemed to her (by his report) to be eating a healthy variety of vegetarian foods.  She did some blood tests at my request because I said he seemed very lethargic -- his iron levels were fine, she said; he even had good reserves.   She encouraged me to give him whole milk, not 2%, and to not worry, he was going to his his growth spurt later than other boys so it just looked like he was falling on the charts.

When he was 12, he had fallen further on his weight charts, down to 5th %ile, but still was gaining height so he remained at 30th %ile for height.   To me he seemed really thin and scrawny.   Dr started to get a bit concerned and we started coming in for weight checks every 3 months.    After 6 months,  she prescribed an appetite stimulant for him.   I also reversed my earlier strategy of limiting junk food and started buying him whatever he wanted. For a while I really pushed food on him, and made special trips to the store to get what he wanted.    These things helped him put some weight back on and he seemed like he was finally going the other direction -- gained 2 pounds over 3 months.  He also started gradually eating meat again.... I felt like he was making progress.

But at our most recent check up he had lost those 2 pounds.  His weight is at the 2nd%ile   And for the first time now, his height has dropped on the curve as well... to about 14th %ile.

The doctor gave me a referral to a nutritionist she knows in the area who works with kids (girls I presume) who are borderline anorexic.   She gave me copies of his height and weight charts, and from those I constructed a rough estimate of what his BMI for age was over the past years.   The thing is, even as his weight dropped off the curve (he did gain weight of course, just not what is expected of kids at that age) his height for the longest time did NOT drop off.   So his BMI was dropping and dropping for 4 years.

Age 6 his BMI was around 45%ile
Age 7:  25th %ile
Age 8: 25th %ile
Age 9: 20th%ile
Age 10: 8th %ile
Age 11: 8th %ile
Age 12: 3rd %ile
Age 13: 1st %ile

He's 70 pounds, and 58 inches right now with a BMI of 14.6.  The thing is, I don't think he is anorexic.  But he just has no appetite and doesn't eat enough!

I searched an searched for people in my area who can deal with this -- and found information on something called ARFID -- avoidant/restricted Food Intake disorder.   That seems to really describe his case.   Unfortunately there aren't a lot of places that seem to know anything about it.   

I have already learned a great deal just from reading people's experiences here.   His issues may be very different from those of someone with anorexia or bulimia, but it seems that the treatment is going to be very much the same.  I wonder if others here have a boy (or girl) like mine, and if so what you have done and where you have gone for help?










PuddleduckNZ

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Honey Badger.

I'm so sorry you are going through this too.

Read around here. There is so much great info and others who have been there.

Ahhh, oh man.

I have a similar, but different, story. I'm not able to type much here right now, but yes it sounds like my son in places.

He went downhill FAST once he started to go down.

Although he was not a fussy kid AT ALL below abut 8yrs, but slowly had become quite selective and restrictive months before dx, but if I think back there were a few things he had cut from his diet, none of it makes ANY sense in terms of the worries of being fat that AN has, (he also told me he wanted to be a vegetarian in 2013 and that he didn't like meat, but would still eat roast lamb and anything 'processed', loved fish and shellfish, but no chicken, would eat salami, but no ham). Sushi but only certain kinds (panko crumb/shrimp), yoghurt but only certain brands, one kind of hot choc, bananas, one kind of cereal, eaten in small bowls only.


He completely stopped eating and drinking whilst in hospital and was dx with ED (they were looking for gastro issues as the cause).

We are aiming to restore him to his growth curve (which is about the 25th percentile). He was off the bottom of the chart at one point.

I will come back later.

Kind thoughts to you x

__________________
Son 9yrs when he became unwell 2013, ED slide from April 2014, dx at 10yrs July 2014, 2 hospitalisations - dx so many times Behavioural Anorexia, EDNOS, ARFID. FBT from August 2014. Anxiety, Emetophobia. 12.5yrs old now! In recovery, gets better every day with constant vigilance, life returns.
YogurtParfait_US

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Reply with quote  #3 
"He's 70 pounds, and 58 inches right now with a BMI of 14.6.  The thing is, I don't think he is anorexic.  But he just has no appetite and doesn't eat enough!"

Your dear son looks longingly at roast chicken. Methinks he is hungry, very hungry, and that this is not a problem of appetite. My daughter also claimed to not be hungry. Claimed to be just fine. Claimed to have had plenty. Claimed to have eaten elsewhere. Regardless, the treatment for starvation or malnutrition is the same, whether the sufferer has an eating disorder or low appetite: food is medicine. And, for someone who doesn't want to eat, food plus supervision. Lovingly required full nutrition. It is difficult, but life-saving. My own daughter now eats the full range of foods that she restricted, and has told me how much she always loved them, and how hard it was not to eat them. She had also wanted to be a vegetarian (but I didn't let her). Let me tell you, though, that my not allowing vegetarianism didn't prevent her from getting anorexia--it may have delayed it, but she still got it. EDs are genetically heritable illnesses. You didn't cause this due to your parenting or how you feed your kid. But, parents have a HUGE role in helping the child-who-won't-eat to get back on the path to health. You are your son's best advocate and are the key to his recovery from whatever-this-is.

This is a great place to ask questions and get answers from parents in the trenches and those whose kids are better. There is tons of hope. Read the stories in the recovery thread at the top of the forum.

Sending warm support!

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"Hope is a wonderful thing ... but hope by itself is not enough. Hope is the reason to take action, to make a plan and then to change the plan when it isn’t working - over and over and over again if necessary." Hannah Joseph (Let's Feast Friday Reflection, "Just Keep Going," Friday, March 3rd, 2015)
Rayney

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Reply with quote  #4 
My daughter also said she had no appetite, her braces hurt, she couldn't eat before/or straight after dance etc.  I didn't think it would ever be this but wish I had one not listened to the nurse who said I was being neurotic and just took her back to the doctors.  I think I would take him to see the G.P and maybe speak to him first to inform him of the weight, food and bmi issues, better safe than sorry.  Good luck.
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17 years old, well into recovery and taking full control of food herself and gaining weight, she's loving life at the minute, it does get better!!
trusttheprocessUSA

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hello and welcome. I do hope someone with an experience of AFRID posts soon. My son was 12 when he got sick and it took a long time before I realized what was happening. We needed up traveling across the country for treatment.

At that age the boys are gearing up to grow into a man. It takes so many calories to get them there. You have every right to be alarmed - his growth chart demands attention from experts.

Keep feeding him what ever he will eat.

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Son diagnosed @ 12.5 yrs old with Severe RAN 2/11. Co-morbids - anxiety, Active restriction for 3 months. He stopped eating completely 2x. He needed immediate, aggressive treatment from a provider who specialized in eating disorders, adolescents and males. We got that at Kartini Clinic. WR since 5/11. 2017 getting ready to graduate slipping lost 8lbs. Fighting our way back.
Tali97

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Reply with quote  #6 
When you say there are not a lot of places that know about ARFID are you looking at websites or contacting them directly?
I expect that any of the good eating disorder places will help you. ARFID is an eating disorder and food has to be eaten.  i am not in the US so perhaps someone can point you in the direction of a good places near you.
Did your doc check your sons heart rate and orthostatic blood pressure? 
My son has ARFID although 4 years before that he got a diagnosis of food phobia. He has no appetite, and never has and we struggle to feed him.
You say your son will tolerate dairy. There are various recipes on this site for high calorie milk shakes. 

There was a study being done by a Canadian children hospital(CHEO) to develop a tool to help parents with teens with eating disorders. ARFID is mentioned in their teaching package
https://canped.ca/



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18 year old boy (Gluten Free/Dairy Free 2005)
 IP - March/April 2014.  ARFID.
 2015 - Gastroparisis
Torie

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tali97
snip
You say your son will tolerate dairy. There are various recipes on this site for high calorie milk shakes. 
snip

Until I found this forum, I didn't realize that Haagen Daaz and Ben and Jerry's ice cream are much higher calorie than most of the others.  You can put a high cal ice cream in the blender and add enough HWC to get right consistency ... so simple and plenty of calories and delicious.

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"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
SCL

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Reply with quote  #8 
Welcome.  I'm new here and also in your area.   In addition to the other advice you've gotten, you might also check into the Eating/Feeding Disorders Center (Clinic?) and Children's National Medical Center (DC campus, not Fairfax).  I know they work with this disorder with much younger children, but they may be in a place to direct you to resources that might be more helpful for a teenager.

Good luck to you.

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Mom of 15 year old daughter, RAN diagnosed Nov., 2014.  WR June, 2014.
galanick

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Reply with quote  #9 
Sounds a lot like both of my eating problem kids. My 14 has ran very pickey and 7 year old is selective eater ( also only certain toddler foods). And starting Down the wrong path not eating enough unless I force her. I too have tried to force them to eat new things or go without eating, tried cooking 2-3 separate meals at a time so would have something two picked ones would eat and something for rest of us that are so sick of the five things those two will eat. But even with this effort they seem to get pickier and eat less. For a long time I felt was my fault either I catered to them too much or maybe not enough. But in the end I think my kids just have the Ed genetics and showed symptoms from early age.

Really ARFID, an, ran, ednos, atypical an. The way they get to the point of not eating enough may look a little different but in the end all that matters is they are all starving. None of them want to eat, they can't by themselves. Some because of fear, depression, anxiety or even lack of appetite. Many of these kids have loss there appetite from being hungry so long, they no longer feel hunger because there body has decided it is useless response, there must not be any food available. It can take months or years of full nutrition for hunger to come back. I would say it took ny 14 about 6 months or longer of full eating to say she was hungry. Not there yet with 7 yr old, she begged me to send a note to school saying she did not need to eat lunch.

I don't think his stories is so much different than many of the kids here, you just don't here about an on news show ect until they almost stop eating. No one really talks about how gradual build up to that. Some kids go from restricting single food group to not eating enough quickly and other slower.

I won't worry too much about place that specializes in afrid. would pick a good Ed center. I would love to say just start feeding him but given how long he had eating issue worry he could be at high risk for refeeding syndrome. He may need medical admit, Eating disorder kids are different than healthy kids and frequently the problems are missed by family doc or regular Ped. He probably needs labs, ekg, heart rate, blood sugar and orthostatic blood pressure checked.

some good Ed centers that have medical units are ucsd in ca, Erc denver, Lauretta ok, veritas NC, and chops in philly. There are some others too just don't know off top of head.

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eeyore
mnmomUSA

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Reply with quote  #10 
It may not help you much given where you are located, but my D's treatment center has ARFID expertise.  (Children's Minneapolis, Center for Treatment of Eating  Disorders).

I agree with others that the most important thing now is to get full nutrition in him, 3 meals and 2 snacks per day.  Look for ways to up the calorie content of EVERYTHING he eats.  For example, add heavy whipping cream (2-3 Tablespoons) to every single glass of milk (we do this whenever D needs to gain a few pounds, as she does now...you can add about a pound per week JUST with this).  Add Carnation Instant Breakfast to that same glass of milk, and you've added another 130 calories.  Put oil (extra) on pasta.  There's a lot of ideas on this site about how to do that.  Look in the Hall of Fame posts.  :-)


__________________
D, age 17, first diagnosed March 20, 2013, RAN, at age 13 Hospitalized 3 weeks for medical stability. FBT at home since.  UCSD Multi-family Intensive June 2015. We've arrived on the other side.  :-)
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PuddleduckNZ

I have a similar, but different, story. I'm not able to type much here right now, but yes it sounds like my son in places.

He went downhill FAST once he started to go down.

Although he was not a fussy kid AT ALL below abut 8yrs, but slowly had become quite selective and restrictive months before dx, but if I think back there were a few things he had cut from his diet, none of it makes ANY sense in terms of the worries of being fat that AN has, (he also told me he wanted to be a vegetarian in 2013 and that he didn't like meat, but would still eat roast lamb and anything 'processed', loved fish and shellfish, but no chicken, would eat salami, but no ham). Sushi but only certain kinds (panko crumb/shrimp), yoghurt but only certain brands, one kind of hot choc, bananas, one kind of cereal, eaten in small bowls only.


That sounds a lot like my son in the early stages of this.   Only this one brand of minestrone soup, not this other practically identical one, because something about the taste or texture was "off" or "tinny" or "different".   But he WOULD be hungry, and he would very happily eat -- if I got him the right food.

I would love to hear more about your son's experiences if you have a chance or have a link to where you posted his story.   Thank you.
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by YogurtParfait_US

Your dear son looks longingly at roast chicken. Methinks he is hungry, very hungry, and that this is not a problem of appetite. My daughter also claimed to not be hungry. Claimed to be just fine. Claimed to have had plenty. Claimed to have eaten elsewhere. Regardless, the treatment for starvation or malnutrition is the same, whether the sufferer has an eating disorder or low appetite: food is medicine. And, for someone who doesn't want to eat, food plus supervision. Lovingly required full nutrition. It is difficult, but life-saving. My own daughter now eats the full range of foods that she restricted, and has told me how much she always loved them, and how hard it was not to eat them. She had also wanted to be a vegetarian (but I didn't let her). Let me tell you, though, that my not allowing vegetarianism didn't prevent her from getting anorexia--it may have delayed it, but she still got it. EDs are genetically heritable illnesses. You didn't cause this due to your parenting or how you feed your kid. But, parents have a HUGE role in helping the child-who-won't-eat to get back on the path to health. You are your son's best advocate and are the key to his recovery from whatever-this-is.



Thank you for your kind words, Yogurt Parfait!   

I think my son has had a lot of different issues and stages as he's gone through/progressed/changed in this illness.   At some points it felt to me like there was some aspect of control -- he was proud of being a vegetarian, and was forcing himself not to eat meat despite his body craving out to him for the protein and calories.  

The texture/highly sensitive to taste problem though was also very real and getting in the way of him being able to eat foods.   As I posted earlier, he would very happily eat food and plenty of it, as long as I got him the *right* food.   (for example, black bean soup from the specific restaurant (30 minutes away) that sells it (only on Fridays) for example.  He told me he was hungry and asked me for food.  He never told me (back then) he wasn't hungry, or ate at school, or whatever.

The lack of appetite is more recent and it applies even to foods he used to like.   I think you are right, whatever the reason he got to this nutrition deprived state, the treatment at first has to be to refeed him.

PuddleduckNZ

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Reply with quote  #13 
Here is my first post...

http://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/10yo-son-behavioural-anorexia-7046138?pid=1284631242#post1284631242&gsc.tab=0

Click my name and you'll find all my babble from the last 6mths.

There is other stuff that isn't on here, feel free to email me too, I may not respond straight away as we are going through a real rough patch dammit, but I will reply.

H had the sensitivities to textures and tastes and once something tasted 'off' 'bad' 'yuck' whatever there was no going back and the reaction completely irrational.

'The lack of appetite is more recent and it applies even to foods he used to like.' This happened here too :/

In terms of diagnosis of which Ed it is, the only real difference I have noticed in our experience (re-diagnosed 3x) is that CBT can be brought in earlier for ARFID where in AN it is left til later after WR.

Take care and get anything and everything into him while you work this out. Make some high cal smoothies.

I think most of us wish we could back-track and get more food in much faster than we did when we first started out.

__________________
Son 9yrs when he became unwell 2013, ED slide from April 2014, dx at 10yrs July 2014, 2 hospitalisations - dx so many times Behavioural Anorexia, EDNOS, ARFID. FBT from August 2014. Anxiety, Emetophobia. 12.5yrs old now! In recovery, gets better every day with constant vigilance, life returns.
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tali97
When you say there are not a lot of places that know about ARFID are you looking at websites or contacting them directly?


Well, that's just my first impression, yeah, looking at websites.  Only a few even mention boys or ARFID so that was just my initial impression.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tali97
Did your doc check your sons heart rate and orthostatic blood pressure?


Yes, she said he was perfectly normal with heart rate and blood pressure.  We also have a family history of celiac disease and she did blood work to rule that out; said he was not low in iron or iron stores; did not have anemia; and she checked his thyroid levels as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tali97
My son has ARFID although 4 years before that he got a diagnosis of food phobia. He has no appetite, and never has and we struggle to feed him.
You say your son will tolerate dairy. There are various recipes on this site for high calorie milk shakes. 

There was a study being done by a Canadian children hospital(CHEO) to develop a tool to help parents with teens with eating disorders. ARFID is mentioned in their teaching package
https://canped.ca/



Thank you, and I am sorry for your struggles.   Yes, my son likes milk shakes a great deal.   If i could only learn to make one here at home that he liked, I'd be over the moon.   That would be so much easier.   At the moment he will only eat two from two different fast food restaurants (again, 30 min away) as well as a mango lassi from an Indian restaurant.   
If I get him those milk shakes, he will rapidly drink them all away.   

I will try making one with Haagen Daaz and Heavy Whipping cream.  He might like that.

I've been pushing food on him the past few days, and getting him foods I know he likes; but not outright requiring him to eat (yet).   We have an appointment at an ED clinic in a few weeks and if they say it is time to require him, I will, but I will need a professional's support on that - for my son, and also for my husband, who I think will need more time to buy into this.   Right now I am just trying to keep an accurate record of what my son is eating.

With my total attention, (but not requiring him),  I think he's taken in about 2500 calories today.   He wasn't interested in some red velvet cupcake with cream cheese frosting -- usually a favorite treat -- saying he was just too full.  He IS trying to eat more and stretch himself,  and was proud of himself for learning to like a new food -- 1/4 C spiced macadamia nuts as a midday snack at school.  

I know that is a lot more calories than he has been eating lately.  I never really counted before, but he was likely taking in more like 1600 to 1800 or so, on a good day -- certainly nowhere near 2000 calories a day.   So this increase is good -- but I also believe he likely needs even more per day.   Getting anything over 2500 a day is going to be really, really hard.   If we are told to try for 3500 OMG I don't know how he is going to do it!!  From everything I have read here, I think that's what we are going to have to aim for.   I understand the reasone why but wow, this is going to be hard.
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #15 


Oh Puddleduck, what a time you have been through!

Yes, my biggest fear for my son right now is that he has no reserves.   Any illness or medical procedure that cuts him off from eating for a couple of days would do an incredible amount of damage as appears happened to your son.

He was recommended to have his wisdom teeth pulled over the summer (he is super young to have them out, but there is some reason they are in danger of needing to be removed earlier) but I consulted with an oral surgeon about my concerns -- I don't want to mess with his mouth at all, risk him having any nausea, interfere with his eating in any way for even a day, until his weight is more stable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PuddleduckNZ
I think most of us wish we could back-track and get more food in much faster than we did when we first started out.


I hear you!   I am trying to take that advice to heart right now.  Thank you for taking time out of your busy like to share your comments with me.
mnmomUSA

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Reply with quote  #16 
It isn't as hard as it seems to get 3500 (or even more) calories in per day.  We topped out at 4500.  I aimed for 1100 per main meal (3) and 4-500 per snack (which we did three times per day at that point).  Even 2 500 calorie snacks gets you over 4000.


Key for me was the daily smoothie (12 ounces or so), which was some frozen fruit, whole fat yogurt, heavy whipping cream, honey, and canola oil.  Yes, a TON of fat in that baby, and probably a 1000 calories ALONE.  Add a dense muffin to that (lots of nuts ground up fine), and you can definitely pack 1500 or more calories into "just" a smoothie and muffin.  :-)  Not that I'm recommending them, but those Sara Lee muffins you buy are close to 500 calories!  It's easy to make a muffin with that many calories if you prefer homemade.  I follow the Moosewood recipe for muffins, and add lots of nuts.  The ones I make for D are 150+ calories per mini size muffins (like two bites).  She has 4 of those without batting an eyelash or protesting that they are "too much."

I know it goes against the grain in this country to make high fat foods, but they saved my sanity when refeeding D.  I'm pretty sure the people at my local Costco think I run some sort of restaurant given the amount of heavy whipping cream I buy.  At least a half gallon goes in my cart weekly.  And, D dispatches with nearly all of it herself.  (Oh, and if I needed to make pancakes, waffles, anything that had milk in it, I'd automatically substitute HWC for the milk).  Sometimes I have to play with amounts a bit to get the right consistency, but it sure adds calories without it being obvious to D.

__________________
D, age 17, first diagnosed March 20, 2013, RAN, at age 13 Hospitalized 3 weeks for medical stability. FBT at home since.  UCSD Multi-family Intensive June 2015. We've arrived on the other side.  :-)
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnmomUSA
It isn't as hard as it seems to get 3500 (or even more) calories in per day.  We topped out at 4500.  I aimed for 1100 per main meal (3) and 4-500 per snack (which we did three times per day at that point).  Even 2 500 calorie snacks gets you over 4000.


Key for me was the daily smoothie (12 ounces or so), which was some frozen fruit, whole fat yogurt, heavy whipping cream, honey, and canola oil.  Yes, a TON of fat in that baby, and probably a 1000 calories ALONE.  Add a dense muffin to that (lots of nuts ground up fine), and you can definitely pack 1500 or more calories into "just" a smoothie and muffin.  :-)  Not that I'm recommending them, but those Sara Lee muffins you buy are close to 500 calories!  It's easy to make a muffin with that many calories if you prefer homemade.  I follow the Moosewood recipe for muffins, and add lots of nuts.  The ones I make for D are 150+ calories per mini size muffins (like two bites).  She has 4 of those without batting an eyelash or protesting that they are "too much."

I know it goes against the grain in this country to make high fat foods, but they saved my sanity when refeeding D.  I'm pretty sure the people at my local Costco think I run some sort of restaurant given the amount of heavy whipping cream I buy.  At least a half gallon goes in my cart weekly.  And, D dispatches with nearly all of it herself.  (Oh, and if I needed to make pancakes, waffles, anything that had milk in it, I'd automatically substitute HWC for the milk).  Sometimes I have to play with amounts a bit to get the right consistency, but it sure adds calories without it being obvious to D.


FANTASTIC!   I made a milk shake today with 1/C  C  Haagen Daaz chocolate ice cream and  1 C HWC and he drank it all down quite easily and happily.  That's about 900 calories in one drink and it is something I made at home!   

We had a snow day from school today so I did more experimenting with high calorie foods -- made some hot spiced macademia nuts that he liked and even asked for again.  That's two new home cooked foods that he's willing/able to eat.  I will try the muffins soon.
PuddleduckNZ

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hey, I have been wondering, what the heck is 'heavy whipping cream'? Is it cream in a can pre-whipped?

In NZ we just have standard cream and canned cream.

Been meaning to ask you Americans for awhile!

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Son 9yrs when he became unwell 2013, ED slide from April 2014, dx at 10yrs July 2014, 2 hospitalisations - dx so many times Behavioural Anorexia, EDNOS, ARFID. FBT from August 2014. Anxiety, Emetophobia. 12.5yrs old now! In recovery, gets better every day with constant vigilance, life returns.
galanick

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Reply with quote  #19 
It comes in carton like milk or cream and use it to make home made whip cream. Looks like thick milk. Has more fat than cream. Here it is grocery next to cream.

Per dictionary. There are differences in milk-fat content. All cream contains at least 18 percent milk fat: "whipping cream" is made up of 30 percent, while cartons labeled "heavy cream" or "heavy whipping cream" must contain 36 percent or more

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Reply with quote  #20 
Heavy cream contains approximately 800 calories per cup (8 fluid ounces); whole milk, in contrast, contains approximately 160 calories per cup.
PuddleduckNZ

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Reply with quote  #21 
Thanks, I assumed that's what it was, but was not sure! Basically the cream off the top of the fresh milk.

The bottle in my fridge says its 352cal to 100ml.

I never ever read labels or understood 'calories' before this, still learning.

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Son 9yrs when he became unwell 2013, ED slide from April 2014, dx at 10yrs July 2014, 2 hospitalisations - dx so many times Behavioural Anorexia, EDNOS, ARFID. FBT from August 2014. Anxiety, Emetophobia. 12.5yrs old now! In recovery, gets better every day with constant vigilance, life returns.
Torie

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PuddleduckNZ
Thanks, I assumed that's what it was, but was not sure! Basically the cream off the top of the fresh milk.

The bottle in my fridge says its 352cal to 100ml.

I never ever read labels or understood 'calories' before this, still learning.

It's a bit ironic that they call it "Heavy" as it does indeed float on top of milk.

I never read labels or thought of calories before either ... ah, the good old days ...

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trusttheprocessUSA

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Reply with quote  #23 
Check that fat content - here is the US the much of the canned whipped cream is lower in fat grams. The liquid heavy whipping cream is higher. You can add it to yogurt, smoothies, mashed potatoes, oatmeal, anything that you would use milk for add HWC.

Great news Honey_badger so glad your boy is eating.

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Son diagnosed @ 12.5 yrs old with Severe RAN 2/11. Co-morbids - anxiety, Active restriction for 3 months. He stopped eating completely 2x. He needed immediate, aggressive treatment from a provider who specialized in eating disorders, adolescents and males. We got that at Kartini Clinic. WR since 5/11. 2017 getting ready to graduate slipping lost 8lbs. Fighting our way back.
PuddleduckNZ

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Reply with quote  #24 
Sorry for high-jacking your thread Honey_Badger!

I never buy canned whip cream, (unless someone wants it for a cream fight!) just normal cream and always use this in cooking, mash, sauces, etc, even before ED.

I notice you guys say add it to smoothies and food in the place of milk. I can add a few Tblspns, but I can't completely, too gross, and wonder if its our NZ cream quality? 

Its ridiculously rich, I couldn't drink it in a smoothie and I like cream a lot.

I sneak it where I can though.

Torie, I think that's what got me confused, no one calls in 'heavy' here [wink]

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Son 9yrs when he became unwell 2013, ED slide from April 2014, dx at 10yrs July 2014, 2 hospitalisations - dx so many times Behavioural Anorexia, EDNOS, ARFID. FBT from August 2014. Anxiety, Emetophobia. 12.5yrs old now! In recovery, gets better every day with constant vigilance, life returns.
Honey_Badger

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Reply with quote  #25 
Puddleduck, I was never able to add whole cream to milk or sauces like I read people do.   My son just tasted it (too creamy?  to oily?) and wouldn't eat another bit.   Once I tried pouring half and half (that's cream people put in their coffee -- half cream and half milk) over his cereal instead of whole milk, and he was disgusted.

So that's why I am SO EXCITED that he drank this milk shake down with no complaints.   It was Haagen Daaz chocolate chip ice cream ( a  full fat, premium brand) and heavy whipping cream.  I added a bit of vanilla as well and half a banana because it felt like I should.   It wasn't very thick.   I made it in the blender and it had the consistency more like a chocolate milk drink.   But he drank the whole thing around 4 PM and even had a little room for some dinner... chili with corn chips and guacamole.   Not a lot but still.   This is a lot more calories than he usually eats and him mood is so agreeable tonight.

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