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sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #26 
Great HuffPo article written by Laura Collins Lyster-Mench after watching To The Bone.
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nerd

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Reply with quote  #27 
I saw it and agree about the "easy fix." If an iconoclastic psychiatrist or a possible pregnancy can "cure" the illness, how serious was it in the first place? (Of course, she did end up purging and losing the pregnancy.) Or am I generalizing?
nerd

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Reply with quote  #28 
I will read this; it seems like Laura has a different take on it from Carolyn Costin's rather positive one.
EDAction

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Reply with quote  #29 
I watched the movie today.

I agree with Laura's HuffPo article mentioned by sk8r31.

Additionally . . . I would not recommend this movie to someone who I wanted to educate about EDs and what our D and our family have gone through.  It would give them the wrong impression that treatment is about motivating D to choose to get better.  It would make them think that the best thing to do is to not talk about food nor require it to be eaten even when the person with ED is medically compromised.  It would not teach them anything about FBT/Maudsley.  

I understand that the director was drawing on her own experience.  And this may be exactly what she experienced and a true story.  And I am glad she recovered.  She is brave to share her story.  I wish she would have added that the understanding of EDs and the treatment of EDs has changed.  Because with the paucity of movies/shows about EDs, those who watch this movie who don't already know otherwise will think this is the current state of ED treatment.
nerd

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Reply with quote  #30 
So hospitals are for sick people, which is why they're not in one? And one girl has an NG tube? Huh? Does that mean they're not really sick, or...?
tina72

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Reply with quote  #31 
Thats often a problem with ED, even the professionals don´t see it as a "normal" illness like cancer or diabetes. In hospital they told our d that she was less sick than the other girls because she was not tube fed and her bmi was not as worse as that of other patients...horrible to say something like that to an ED patient...I think the film shows some "ED light" version.
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Reply with quote  #32 
The number 1 thing this movie is missing? You know what the best medicine is for eating disorders? FOOD. Behavior interruption. MORE FOOD! A very healthy weight often much HIGHER than set by professionals and held there long term giving the brain time to right itself. This is not ever talked about in this movie. It is the FIRST THING that has to happen in order to have a chance at recovery. A STARVING AND DYING BRAIN DOES NOT WORK CORRECTLY. Neurotransmitters and hormone are all whacky. There is no logic. A person with an ed does not have to " want" to get better to start treatment. In fact for most this is an impossible thing to expect. The first giant red flag for me in this movie is when the doc said " I'm not going to treat you unless you want to live." For what other illness do we ask this of it's sufferers? This movie does not do nearly enough to challenge the myths and stereotypes of eating disorders. They hit all ages. All races. All levels of socioeconomics. Some overweight people have Anorexia and some underweight people have binge eating disorders. You CANNOT TELL by looking at someone.

The " treatment center" is a joke. People in treatment centers have to EAT. They have to eat 6 times a day. It is not optional. If they don't/can't then they drink supplements. If they can't do this then they get tube feedings. There would NEVER EVER be romances allowed. There would not be fun ENERGY EXPENDING field trips. There would be a constant nurse presence to STOP behaviors such as exercise, hiding food, spitting etc. The portrayal of her treatment is totally NOT how CURRENT EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT treats EDs. This story is from the 1980s yet is set in current times doing a grave disservice to those currently struggling and to their families. The BEST outcomes of today are from Family Based Therapy.

People in the throes of EDs CANNOT SIMPLY CHOOSE TO GET WELL. They don't even understand how gravely ill they are. If you have to " hit rock bottom" then MANY WILL BE DEAD. Dead IS their rock bottom. One of the biggest problems with getting help for EDs is that you have to be " sick enough" for insurance to pay for a damn thing. Then insurance tries to kick you out the second you hit their magical BMI that is ALWAYS TOO LOW.

And people sick with ED are not quirky and funny and witty. They are walking EDs consumed by their illness. 24/7 all thoughts are related. They lose any sparkle. There are no jokes. They seem possessed and mothers and fathers and siblings feel like the person they have known forever is gone. It is absolutely devastating and indescribable.

And EDs happen to people genetically predisposed who get the flu. Who overtrain for sports. Kids who are told in school that foods have moral values who decide to cut out food groups and up their exercise. A simple diet. EDs can start in many ways. And to blame mothers is bullshit. If body talk and fat talk and magazines and media cause EDs then we would all have them. No- moms AND DADS should not talk negatively about their bodies or others in front of their kids. And family dynamics impact all of us. But blaming parents for EDs is like blaming parents for schizophrenia. It is an illness of the brain.

FOOD IS MEDICINE.
And family support is crucial.

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MegsMom

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Reply with quote  #33 
Amen mamabear - you said very eloquently what I've been thinking and feeling since I saw the movie last weekend.

My d would not have survived a center that asked her to make the decision to eat! -- Food is medicine.

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nerd

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Reply with quote  #34 
My friend would rather die than recover! I agree. At her worst, she was dead on most levels, anyway.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #35 
I just watched the movie with my daughter and I'm going to have to disagree with the consensus here in a lot of ways.

The movie is a very accurate portrayal of having an eating disorder.  She is my daughter in so many ways.  My daughter got kicked out of treatment centers for not engaging in treatment (although her collage said you all can kiss my skinny white ass).  She has and has always had a wicked sense of humor and not every treatment center is all gloom and doom.  I was the mother who pulled up to a light to see her daughter jogging, carrying two diet cokes (one in each hand) and the biggest wad of gum you can imagine (all not allowed at her treatment center-and she wasn't supposed to be out to be begin with).

I think the families portrayed are pretty darn accurate for a lot  of people.  The dad doesn't show up because he can't handle it.  The step mother is clueless and the biological mother can't deal with the relentless day after day living with someone who is starving herself to death.  They didn't try FBT but not every family can.  I still think they did a good job of at least trying to show the stresses on families with a loved one with an eating disorder.

The treatment center is unfortunately a lot like most that my daughter was at before I decided to do FBT.  It is very accurate for a lot of the treatment still offered out there.  That was a big misstep for this film in my opinion.  I do like the fact that they show the patients going out and starting to experience life again and those experiences starting to get them interested in things.  That has been essential to my daughter-building a life worth living for.  I do agree that more emphasis should have been placed on eating but those who didn't eat did get tubed.  I love that the doors were taken off to prevent overexercising but I wish there had been more emphasis on stopping purging.

I think with YA and older patients you do have to have some buy-in at some point to recovery and that is the age group seen in this movie.  If they had done a younger adolescent, then maybe FBT and no buy-in would be more accurate.  Is it a great movie?  It's okay and much better than I thought it would be.  I don't like that the lead actress lost weight to do it.  I think they made a good effort and accurately portrayed living with an eating disorder for a lot of people. 

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