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rose08

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Reply with quote  #1 
So we are now 4 months in from my 12 year old D's Anorexia diagnosis, but have learnt from weekly therapy that the ED thoughts were there for a long time before this. Our family is barely, and I mean BARELY keeping it together.  My D blames me completely.  Its my fault she feels sick, as I made her eat.  Its my fault she is doing exercises in her room, as I wont allow her to go to gym.  Its my fault her tummy hurts, as I made her eat meat, and the list goes on.  

Even though we have now had a few weeks of good weight gain (3 meals, 3 snacks, 2 smoothies), there is zero change in her thinking and she still refuses to acknowledge that she even has an eating disorder. For her it is simply "her choice" and we are not letting her be "who she really is" which in her mind is a super fit vegan with a 6 pack to match, who unlike other mortals, can exist on miniscule portions, little to no liquid with a violent reaction to anything remotely resembling a treat or a previously alive animal.    

What I want to know is, how does this change happen and what does it take for this to happen?? I so badly want her to WANT to get better, but how can this take place if she wont even accept it for what it is?  What does this shift in thinking look like? How can I help her realize what this thing is doing to her, when she keeps re-iterating that it is her, not her ED.  I would really like to hear from other parents, as right now it seems like the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow.  xx

PS.  Part of the long awaited weight gain success has been the addition of home-made high calorie "granola bars" (my D wont eat shop bought...) as a snack option for morning or afternoon. I make it with 3 cups oats, 1/2 cup uncooked quinoa, 3/4 cup shredded coconut, 1 cup finely ground nuts, (almonds, cashews, pecans, sunflower, seeds, pistachios etc), 1/4 cup nut butter, 3/4 cup real butter melted, 2 or 3 dollups honey or syrup (my D gets suspicious if too sweet) some raisins if you like and 1 can sweetened condensed milk. Mix altogether, tightly press into a greased baking pan,  decorate on top with dried cranberries or almonds / pumpkin seeds to finish off the healthy look. Bake at 160 degrees for about 45 minutes or until golden brown. I make mine rather intentionally thick, so tend to use a smaller tray and bake slightly longer, I get at least 12 to 14 good size portions. Cut into bars or squares while still warm and leave to cool in tray. Its a flexible recipe that stores well and seems to be pretty forgiving if you want to swop out ingredients.  But, at this point, still made in secret late at night to avoid her ED's scrutiny.
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #2 
Rose, so sorry to read about your d, but you are in the right place. And congrats on the granola bars!! That shows that you are thinking well about how to get her the nutrition she needs and in a very clever way!

Please know that it is not your fault that your d has ED. It's not her fault. It's no one's fault. It's the result of genetics and triggers. No use getting into talk of blame or how it got started. Just don't engage on those points, it will get you nowhere. Better to distract and discuss something else.

Also please know that at this stage, your d's brain is affected and it is absolutely part of the illness that she doesn't see that she is ill. It's so hard to believe this, but you cannot persuade her, you cannot convince her, and she TRULY does not see the problem. That is part of the illness. To say it bluntly, for now you need to give up on getting her to acknowledge that she is ill. If she could acknowledge it, she wouldn't be so ill! The illness involves a perverse irrationality and you can't argue people out of it. Only with full nutrition and weight restoration will it get better. Slowly.

You need also to interrupt the exercise. Mamabear slept with her d to keep her from secretly exercising. And for tummyaches people use water bottles, tums, and lots of distraction. 

If your therapist is talking about "underlying causes" or "d needs to have control", run away asap. If therapist is talking about FBT, Maudsley, and helping you parents with refeeding, then you are in a good place.

The answer to your big question is: Change happens SLOWLY. And the first and only thing for now is full nutritional rehabilitation (great job on the meat!) and weight gain, mostly likely WELL PAST what she was before she got sick and also past what many doctors might recommend. Then her brain will slowly heal. Don't argue with her, just feed and distract/amuse/entertain.

You have already made a great start. Good work.

rose08

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Reply with quote  #3 
Dear EC Mom
I think the hardest part for me is her unwillingness to help herself, it is so very, very difficult to rationalize from a non ED perspective.  I have given up asking why and have accepted that it just is, and liken it to the perfect storm scenario, and as you say no-ones fault.  I do find it difficult to talk about with others as, often that is the their sole focus, the "how did this happen" which I find draining and counter-productive - so unfortunately I have isolated myself in this battle.  

We are fortunate that our therapist here is very supportive of what we are doing at home, and backs me up regarding re-feeding, exercise, routines etc and is very aware of the food is medicine mantra. However there is some emphasis on "underlying causes" in terms of my daughters huge issues of self esteem, body image, but its more towards challenging her on these negative thought patterns... but as mentioned, there is no shift in her thinking, in fact, sometimes it seems to be even worse.  

I have noticed that her ED can almost shape shift, I think we are having a good day, and then she suddenly refuses to bath, or the exercising flares up again, or we have a few good meals and then suddenly after 2 bites at the next one she is pushing her plate away and we are back to basics.  The latest is restricting liquids. I feel like I can never let my guard down.
Re full weight restoration, our GP initially named a target weight which I knew was too low, unfortunately this was done in front of my daughter and is now practically burned into her consciousness. We weigh her blind now, and no numbers are discussed in front of her, but I know she must sense the gains we are making - perhaps this is why her ED seems to be ratcheting up a notch?   I keep holding on to the hope that once we have the right weight restoration that some switch will flip and I will finally have my rational daughter back...   

I joke with my husband that one day I will publish a high calorie "healthy" cook book for weight gain, i spend my little free time dreaming up breakfast muffins recipes, calorie packed dinner ideas - its almost like alchemy when it all comes together and I guess it makes me feel like CAN do something and feel a little less helpless.  
Thank you for your kind words xx
sunnyakela

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Reply with quote  #4 
I don't have a whole lot to add to what EC said, but we are a year from diagnosis and about 6 months from reaching IBW and there has been no change in our daughter's thinking process or her body dysmorphia. Our nutritionist says that it sometimes happens like a light switch. I have also been told that it takes a full year at IBW for any mental progress to happen. 5-7 years is the average recovery time. 

We have discovered that when she was battling us less, she was actually secretly purging, exercising, water loading, wearing weights for appointments and losing weight again. We were happy that things seemed to be going so well, but she had just learned that she could work around us.

Just be as steady as you can. Logic doesn't work, so don't feel the need to explain everything. We made the mistake of giving in to her in small ways. She was temporarily happier, but you can't take that inch back. The negotiating just gets stronger. 

Take care of yourself too. It is really tough, but you are doing great so far.




martican

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi rose08. Sounds like you are equipped with some great ammo - nutritious recipes. I will def try the one you posted, thank so much for that.
You are asking how does this change happen. I'd say with gaining more until it happens. My d was blaming all the docs and myself when she was far from wr but closer she got, all of a sudden she said how angry she was at her AN, and she wanted it to be gone. That was also with weekly ED therapy, and monthly visits of ED doctor. It took us 21 months. I had the same feeling like you, I just wanted to know approximate timeline of  some light at the end of the tunnel. But that just made me more frustrated. Hang in there, logic doesn't work now, keep feeding. xx
seaglass

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Reply with quote  #6 
You're just at the beginning of a long road to recovery. I think that one of the most frustrating parts about this illness is the very thing you've described of our ill children refusing to believe they are in any danger and not wanting to get better. I, like you, found this incredibly hard. I used to try and reason with my d and counter her illogical arguments but soon came to realise it was pointless.

Her ED 'voice' is so strong right now. If you can I found it better to just not get into any debate with it. I would just say 'I love you. I know it's hard. I'm doing what we need to do to keep you safe' and that was it.

I also know that at the beginning I wanted nothing more than to know how long this hell would last and how quickly things would change. Also to be told it might take years is equally hard. The thing is that true recovery might take a long long time but that doesn't mean things won't gradually get easier for you all.

As your d gains she will slowly start to heal. The brain change can take much longer. I started to feel calmer when I just accepted that my job was to feed her, to support her as she dealt with each meal and each day and to not race ahead with the need for any big changes in her mood or brain.

Of course, there are many little steps forward and positive changes as you go ahead. Take ea h little step and hold onto it as a sign of hope.

You sound like you're doing an amazing job getting 3 meals, 3 snacks and 2 smoothies in each day. Honestly we all know just how hard it is ans what a fab job you are doing to achieve that. Keep going. Food is medicine.

It's so hard on the whole family. I was so shattered and drained and sad and scared that I soon realised there was just no point wasting any energy feeling guilty or blaming myself. Here we all know that no one is to blame. If our kids had autism or epilepsy we wouldn't blame ourselves and no one would even start to judge or ask why. This is no different.

Keep feeding. Keep supporting. Hot water bottles after a meal can work well to soothe tummy pains as can distractions like crafts or jigsaws. Sometimes a hug and a cry are what is needed. Sometimes a slow walk in bare feet on the grass... you'll find what works for your d and you.

We all get it. We're all here with you xx
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #7 
Rose, some parents do find it's whack-a-mole, with weird other things that come up or fluctuate as refeeding fluctuates in its levels of difficulty. They all need to be extinguished. But number one is nutrition. We pretty much let all the other stuff go until our d had regained a lot of weight.

I hope your GP knows from now on NEVER to talk in front of your d with numbers or, basically, any recommendations at all except keep feeding and eating. She or he should talk privately with you. Or you can prep him/her with a phone message beforehand saying, "I need you to say 'nutrition is still the priority'". 

Definitely ED sometimes ratchets up as weight goes on. No use arguing or debating, just distract and feed, distract and feed.

I'm skeptical of any psychotherapy around body image or weight while the brain is so compromised. I would ask if the t can instead do some kind of non-ED-related therapy pertaining to OCD or anxiety.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #8 

Rose, she doesn't know she is sick so why would she want to get better?  Seriously not being able to see that one is sick is a hallmark of anorexia so you will not be able to get her to want to get better at this point.  That may come in the future but right now you and your family are the ones who need to carry hope for her to get better.

mamabear

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hello to you. I'm a mom who refed my daughter through growth and puberty after she got sick at 10.5. She is now 17 and in a very solid recovery and has been for years.
She grew 9 inches, went through full puberty, and more than doubled her body weight in that time.

So here's the deal. Your daughter will not acknowledge her illness or the desire to get better for a long time. It is completely normal. Talk therapy about body image is a complete and total WASTE of your time and money. The " why" doesn't matter and frankly, the facts are that this is a highly genetic disease of the brain. For my kid the trigger was " healthy eating and exercise" talks at school. For some it starts as a diet. For some it is overtraining in sports. For some it is the flu. It doesn't really matter because they will all need the same thing: food and weight gain for the long haul.

Your daughter will need to keep gaining for her body to have what it needs to make up for stalled growth/puberty, and once it kicks into high gear, she will need to keep going. You don't really have a target right now as it will keep moving. So dont talk about it.

The most critical thing right now is to get the food in and lots of fats specifically. She doesn't need to be involved in food buying, preparation etc. Her one and only job is to eat what she is given. I would urge you to add heavy cream, butter, and oils whenever possible. Don't talk numbers and don't measure amounts. Don't play into the anorexia. Don't negotiate with her. Acknowledge how difficult it is and then lots of " hmm hmmm" s and changing the subject. Lots of disteactions. We watched 7 seasons of " Charmed".

And remember this: bad professional help can be worse than doing it on your own. If you are feeling your team is not helping, then find other help. YOU run the ship. You are in charge. Meet with them ahead of time. Make it clear you do not want numbers of any sort discussed with her. Make it clear that they need to back you that your daughter is a GROWING CHILD and her weight will need to change accordingly.

I would advise you to keep her out of sports. And remember that this is a marathon and you are in the early days. It often takes upwards of a year or more at a very solid weight ( without losses) for the brain to right itself and for logic to return.

I know how exhausting and terrifying it all is. But I found that when I truly embraced the fight... when I truly stopped looking towards the " when will xyz happen" is when progress was made. It takes as long as it takes. It will be your families' journey.

You can do this.

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Torie

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Reply with quote  #10 
Dear Rose -

You are doing a great job.  The only thing that really matters is getting your d's weight back up, and you are doing that.  Yay, you!!!

Well, actually there is one additional thing that matters: Taking care of yourself at least a little. Like they say on the airplanes, you can't help someone else if you don't have your own oxygen mask on first.  So please be sure to take a little time each day for yourself - reading, soaking in a nice bath, whatever gives you strength.

Hang in there, and keep swimming.  You will get your d back. xx

-Torie

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"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi there,
Welcome from Dublin.
This link may explain more,
Best wishes

http://www.mirror-mirror.org/anosognosia.htm

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #12 
You are doing a great job here. One of the things that makes parenting children with eating disorders so hard is the counter-intuitive nature of the illness. 
Toothfairy has given you a great link about anosgnosia, and here is another one http://tabithafarrar.com/2016/12/anosognosia-eating-disorders-dont-know-sick/

The other issue is that even if your D does recognise she is sick you need to then deal with the issue of the illness frequently being ego-syntonic.  

Trying to convince her of her illness can be a fruitless task. At present being firm and clear about what needs to happen, that is she needs full nutrition all of the time, and that her illness stops her from seeing that. Her anger at you is because she just can't see it. So acknowledge that things are really hard for her, acknowledge that she finds things distressing, but this should not distract from what needs to happen.

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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
rose08

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thank you everyone, I feel so much less alone after reading all your replies.  Its Sunday here in sunny SA and another day spent cooking and baking to try keep up with the week ahead.  Does anyone else feel that their life revolves around the kitchen, shopping for ingredients, food preparation, trying to add something different each week so as not to the let the ED get too "comfortable"....  not that I for a moment believe my D is comfortable, I know she is tormented, but her ED TRIES to get comfortable. 

As much as having a routine helps, it also seems to feed into the rules her ED has set.  I try to bend them a little each day, sometimes with moderate success, at other times to violent outbursts if lunch on the weekend is a littler earlier than usual, or I have added something she didn't know about previously or isn't on her list of "safe foods".  We have gotten to the point where dinner is the cook's prerogative (that would be me[smile])  and is a family meal, no input or requests allowed... Breakfast and lunch are still pretty set affairs, with only a few options to draw from - she is back in school (monitored) so we've taken the choice of less challenging but still nutritious options during the day.  The snacks are currently what I am working on, trying to incorporate a new one every few days - sounds easy, but it has been hugely challenging, even more so than dinner at this point.
I have read many times about the "rip the band-aid" off method - in the beginning when she was still home this is what we did, as any food was practically a fear food. It did get us to the point of her being able to eat the 3 meals, 3 snacks and 2 smoothies but it also shattered our family dynamic (I have a younger child who is now in therapy to try deal with this as it was causing huge anger issues, sleep issues,etc) which we are still trying to piece together.... so we are now in this sort of middle ground where as long as she is gaining weight we are are willing to accommodate "healthy" choices, however meat is not negotiable.  She has yet to try ice-cream, chocolate, sweets, chips etc since her diagnosis.  Do I believe she will eat these again?  I really cant say. Is she learning about healthy fats, oils, food combinations, yes.  Is she willing to try new healthier options, almost yes.
I really hope we are doing the right thing. Its a real balancing act, trying to keep a family intact, hold down a job, a marriage and be a mom to a younger sibling as well as dealing with the HUGE presence of an ED.  As mentioned before, where we are there are no dedicated eating disorder facilities, in patient or out-patient.  There are hospitals with general psych wards and that's pretty much it. Our medical insurance will only cover 12 therapy consults (for an Anorexia or Bulimia diagnosis) and no more - no follow up appointments with the GP, no related blood tests, no medication, no dietitian... is that standard practice for the rest of the world?  I'm still only learning how under equipped we are, and think perhaps its because of where we are based.  Have any of you managed to keep working (if you were working before) or are you at home with your child? How have you balanced this with siblings? Sorry, so many questions, but I am just trying to get a feel for what this new normal looks like.... xx
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hi Rose,
I am so sorry, it takes a while to get our heads around this vile illness.
Unfortunately this is a very long road.
It is a brain illness not your fault & not her fault.

The illness has a very high mortality rate & it is much much worse for your daughter than it is for the carers.

My advice is the faster you get her re-fed up to a target weight that is good for her & keep gaining for years into her 20's, the faster she will recover.

Food is the medicine. Add. Butter & cream to everything you can to get the fats & lipids to her brain. Healthy eating in NOT appropriate in this case. Do not negotiate with her disorder on that one.
I had to leave my job & clear my diary. Some managed to keep jobs but I needed to be with my kid to supervise 24/7 for well over a year as he also purged.. I still have to feed him like a farmer & monitor him ( from a distance) ,, as I am chasing growth , but he is in good recovery.

Here is something to explain more



https://aramblingbecky.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/they-have-to-be-ready-to-change/

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #15 
This is good too

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2006/11/26/magazine/26anorexia.html

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #16 


__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
I really hope we are doing the right thing.


Rose, I don't think there is a wrong way as long as she is eating and gaining weight.  At some point you will need to break every ED ritual, habit, rule but it does get easier at a higher weight and when the brain has had some time to heal.  I was able to do the rip the bandaid off from the very start but my daughter is an only child and her father decamped years ago so I only had to worry about the two of us.  One thing I did with big fear foods was do it on special occasions (and for us in public too).  She started eating ice cream at a cousin's birthday party.  My daughter wouldn't react in public so her first ice cream was in public and no warning.  I gave it to her and she ate it.  I don't know if your daughter reacts in public but it might be worth a shot.  My daughter just kept shaking her head at me and I finally told her if she waited much longer she would need a straw but we would sit there until she ate it.  She did.
Torie

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rose08
She has yet to try ice-cream, chocolate, sweets, chips etc since her diagnosis.  Do I believe she will eat these again?  I really cant say. Is she learning about healthy fats, oils, food combinations, yes.  Is she willing to try new healthier options, almost yes.


Rose, this vile illness has hijacked her brain so she isn't thinking rationally about food right now.  It's the weirdest thing ever, because otherwise they are still the rational youngsters we know and love.

So yes, she will eat ice cream and other sweets again.  But no, she really shouldn't be learning about "healthy fats" or any other "healthy" aspect of diet right now.  ALL foods are good, and ALL are healthy for an AN sufferer (in moderation, of course).  Ice cream and cake are healthy for us, for example, because they are part of birthday celebrations, and good health includes being able to participate in and enjoy our normal social customs.

She doesn't need to understand any of this.  She doesn't need to WANT to recover. (My d didn't.)  She "just" needs to eat. It's so weird - took me a long time to wrap my head around that.  Whatever you need to do to get her to eat enough to gain 1 - 2 pounds per week (0.5 to 1 kg) is what you need to do.  

Most 12 year olds do not participate in meal planning or preparation,and 12 year old AN sufferers should not be permitted to.  Your job is to plan meals, shop, cook, and serve.  Her only job is to eat.  It's usually best if they stay OUT of the grocery store and OUT of the kitchen and OUT of any discussions about ingredients, calories, food groups, etc.

Again, it's the weirdest thing.  Please feel free to ask all the questions you like. xx

-Torie





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"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
mamabear

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Reply with quote  #19 
What Torie said!

ALL THAT MATTERS RIGHT NOW IS FOOD IS GOING IN AND SHE IS GAINING.

She should have zero involvement in anything to do with the food. And do not talk about " healthy" foods. Bc there is not such thing. My daughter had a 2200 cal milkshake every day for over 2.5 YEARS made with an entire container of Ben and Jerrys, heavy whipping cream, and oil. Sometimes I threw in a candy bar. And this milkshake was ESSENTIAL MEDICINE to save herr life.

We all have to take a long hard look at ourselves and how our own brains have been hijacked by all of the BS thrown at us our entire lives about weight and food and " healthy" eating. Ice cream is not bad. It's delicious. And for our ED kids it's medicine.

I'm sorry for how this affects the family. My son was 6 when his sister was sick. I had to ask my then 13 year old t take him away a lot to play games etc. Eating as a family sometimes has to go out the window when ED is loud.

You can do this.

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mamabear

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Reply with quote  #20 
http://www.circummensam.com/episode-14-meet-jd-ouellette-parent-advocate.html

A MUST LISTEN

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sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #21 
As you no doubt know...every family is a 'snowflake' and how each one deals with an ED affecting a loved one is somewhat different.

Huge kudos to you for making choices that support recovery...your d is gaining...and doing what it takes to balance family life, marriage, etc as best as is possible.

There is no one right way to do about the recovery process, and you will tweak things as you move forward.  

Transition times can be particularly stressful for our ED kids, and so adjusting things to decrease stress around some things as school begins sounds like a great approach.

You can challenge snack choices or other fear foods more actively once the school routine is more firmly in place.

Hang in there; you are doing amazing work!!

Sending warm support,
sk8r31

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It is good to not only hope to be successful, but to expect it and accept it--Maya Angelou
rose08

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Reply with quote  #22 
Thank you for all the great links, I cant seem to open the video but will subscribe to her channel as i see there are lots more videos on offer.  The audio interview with JD Ouelette really got me thinking, especially the bit about clinicians saying "we wont make you fat" and how my daughter might be processing this. This HAS been said to my daughter, almost I guess to reassure her, but  now I think she could be hearing it as she is RIGHT, fat is bad, something to be feared and to fight against.  My gosh. 

Re: her learning about healthy fats, oils, food groups. A lot of this knowledge has come from school (in fact she stated this is where he "healthy eating" started), some from the advice of her doctor (teaching her what a balanced meal looks like, ie - it has to have carbs, protein, fats etc and needs to taken from across the food groups hence no eliminating whole food groups such as meat or dairy to be vegan. From an early age she was pretty comfortable in the kitchen and up until just before her ED was able to make a few basic meals - however I will acknowledge that from at least age 9 she has had a natural aversion to meat, not on taste or texture but the fact they they were alive before and we killed them, kind of thing.  So.  I do foresee a strong possibility of meat free future at some point in her life, however under my watch and while her ED is calling the shots, there is no chance of that happening.

I am preparing, almost like a boxer before a prize fight I think, for the inevitable battle over the fear foods.  I know it has to be done at some point.  I have some leave coming up over her next school holidays and have had in mind for awhile now to use that time at home to tackle this, and have contingency plans for the rest of the family for the inevitable fall out - the first time this happened we were so very unprepared and the emotional scars are still very fresh.  Thanks again for all the advice and support, I keep referring back to this site and every-time I come away with valuable insights from those who have walked this path and survived to tell the tale! Thanks ladies xx
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #23 
Hi Rose,
Not sure why you cant open the link.

Here are Eva Musby's videos again.

These videos have helped many of us re-feed our loved ones. I STRONGLY ADVISE YOU TO WATCH THEM!



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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #24 



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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Posts: 1,752
Reply with quote  #25 
I advise you to get Eva's book aswell

http://anorexiafamily.com/

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
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