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nw0301

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,

Wondering if anyone can help me understand if I should be seeking help.

 My daughter will be 14 in June. She is currently 157cm tall and 34kg. I will preface by saying that she is very involved in sport so would obviously burn a lot of energy and has always been lean. 

When I read some posts, it mentions getting to x% of weight for height and I don't know how to calculate that. I can see on the growth charts that she is 50ish percentile for height for her age and below 5% for weight but the differential seems to be the important bit and I have no clue how to calculate it.

she appears to eat a lot of food and often but she is loathe to try new foods. She generally chooses healthier food options but is happy to eat a piece of chocolate here and there and has butter on sandwiches (but only eats bread on weekends). Of most concern are a few things she says but when probed she makes a joke out of them. For example "I like being the thinnest in my grade" and "my New Years resolution is/was to not get to 40kg" when I say that these things are not great she says "I'm only joking - I don't have a problem with my weight".

My gut instinct is that things are not quite right or as they seem but I don't want to make a big deal out of potentially nothing. 

What at would other people do in my situation?

apologies as I have realised I am asking a lot more than my original question....

Thanks in advance.
sk8r31

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome to the forum, and hope that you will find the information and support that you are seeking.  The main FEAST website has tons of great resources as well.  It may be worthwhile to check out the FEAST Family Guides for information; easy to read & can be downloaded via pdf.  You'll find them here.

It does seem as if there is cause for concern, based on what your d is saying and what you are observing. A desire to eat healthfully, and so restricting certain foods, can be the start of an ED.   As your d is 14, she should be fueling for puberty and growth, and gaining weight through to young adulthood.

As far as growth charts go, each child is an individual and so growth should follow a steady curve over time.  If there has been a drop in weight for height over time, that is a huge red flag.  What have you observed from charts at an earlier age?

Are there any behavioural changes in your d?  Becoming less social, more isolated, difficulty eating in front of others?  These can also be concerning signs that an ED may be present.

As a parent, you should trust your feelings that something may be 'off'.  The best predictor of lasting recovery from an ED is early intervention with evidence-based treatment.

Ask questions and read as much as you can; knowledge is power!  

Warmly,
sk8r31

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atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi - couple quick thoughts:

1. Your d's height and weight percentiles, as listed in your post, are very similar to my d's. My d has tracked at those percentiles for basically her entire life. I would love it if the weight percentile would rise. Has your d traditionally been at these levels? If your doctor does not do growth charts but does record height and weight values each visit, you can input that data at mygrowthcharts.com and see the curves. mygrowthcharts is a tremendous resource and given your d's young age it would seem worth it to input as much data as you have, then update it occasionally so you can see trends as time goes on.

HMMMM, Well, I just input your d as a 13year/9 month old with the cm and kg you listed and mygrowthcharts shows 34 percentile height and 1st percentile weight. BMI is 13.8, which is less than the First Percentile, with a z-score of −3.10. With numbers like this it is important to understand if this has been her historic arc. If yes, she likely should still be medically assessed to figure out if there is some non-ED reason for her extreme leanness and to be sure she is not having side effects thereof. If her historic is truly what you wrote in your first post (50% height and 3-5% weight - I inferred the range) she should be quickly assessed for medical stability as this is a fairly significant drop off from that sort of historic curve.

2. I was going to write some other things and caution that although my d's story has not ended with an ED diagnosis (not saying you should read it, but if you do, I don't want you to conclude your kid is also not ED) others in similar ranges should not look to that with confidence that their kid is not ED -- but given the discrepancy between your post and what I think I figured out correctly on mygrowthcharts.com about your d's current stats, I will just leave it here so you can post back to clarify what you know of her historic curves and current h/w to be sure we know what we are dealing with as a starting point.

In the meantime, if you think she really has dropped as suggested above, you should be willing to take her in for an urgent assessment if she shows any signs of dizziness or a low pulse rate (athlete aside, a low pulse is a red flag in a kid this lean). Whether urgently or not, when seen by a medical professional, ask them to get an orthostatic blood pressure and a resting pulse rate. There is a tab on this forum with info for doctors to help them be sure to do all the necessary ED assessments — even good pediatricians don't necessarily know all the clinical tests to check for ED, and they sometimes rely on "normal" labs as meaning "NO ED" - which is false.

Post back with more detail or questions if you can. Sorry for this confusing post — I started going one direction and then checked your d on mygrowthcharts and have changed course til more info is known.

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nw0301

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Reply with quote  #4 
THank you all for replying...it is hard to get all the information in one post and my brain is going a million miles an hour, trying to reason with myself and not over-dramatise things.

She has always been lean but probably not quite as lean as this and a lot of people have started commenting - moreso than in the past. I don't have growth chart details other than when she was a baby. she was born 97% for height and 50% for weight and then slowly dropped off weight till she was at 25% and height to 75% - nobody worried as she met all milestones early and was walking at 8.5 months and basically moved constantly.

I do have a measurement just after she started school where she was 70% for height and 10% for weight but she didn't look as lean as she does now. Potentially not as muscly.

TO be honest I would probably not be as worried but for the comments by others and now by her. Then I start to rationalise in my head and say that she only says those things because everyone we meet comments on her weight. 

She never seems dizzy or anything and I just asked her what her pulse rate is, she is getting ready for school....her $500 Garmin says her pulse is 62 - so not too low at all. I will try get a resting one tomorrow morning just for comparison.

She has never been to the doctor other than for injuries (maybe twice in her life) and has never had antibiotics. She does get colds etc but just gets over them.

I will maybe suggest we go for a general checkup - she hates going to the doctor so may require a bit of encouragement.
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #5 
Welcome to the forum. As others have already said there are some concerning features in your story. Your D has been crossing centile lines for height and for weight suggesting she is potentially malnourished. Her choices of "healthier food options" suggests that she is underfuelling if she is physically active, that is she is not eating enough for the activity she is doing.  Even more concerning is that your gut instinct tells you there is something wrong. That in itself tells me there probably is. There is a great Australian website called FeedYourInstinct which has a series of checklists and info for you to take to your GP when you go. 
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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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Reply with quote  #6 
If you wish to calculate weight for height there is a free app available for iphone - not sure about other platforms - called Instant weight for height. FYI this puts the BMI percentile as 0.12% along with a weight for height of 72%. There is no doubt your D is underweight. The only question is why?
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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
nw0301

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks again, will look at the website and the app.

i will definitely get her to a doctor too and try and speak with them before hand it's just a matter of fitting it in. I'm a single mum, work full time and both my kids have a kazillion sporting commitments.

i am worried enough to get her to the doctor though so will have to squeeze it in tomorrow. 

There must be be kids who are naturally this lean though - or am I kidding myself. Another friend suggested coeliac as a possible reason too. 
atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #8 
1. I would not panic, but I would also not stay status quo for very long at all.

2. If she sleeps soundly enough, I'd get a pulse on her tonight while she is sleeping. Real pulse, not Garmin. I don't trust those things a bit, for good reason, having tried several variations and none reliable enough for medical purposes imo. Figure out her nighttime pulse and see if it is comforting or concerning.

3. The h/w percentile decrease is hard to gauge without knowing over what time period those decreases occurred. I don't think those birth percentiles are necessarily the goal, but the 70% height/10% weight might be a good indicator depending on when/how that was achieved. When my very underweight daughter was "evaluated" via phone consult with me and with full medical records available, the evaluator (a nationally known "young kid" ED expert) was encouraging because: a. she had a smooth height curve over time, showing no plateau in linear growth; and b. although extremely thin, her weight for age percentile was above 3%, which this expert said is important — she said it is the kids (ED or not) who are below 3% weight for age, where they see problems from the weight alone. (that is not to say in the setting of quick weight loss there are not other physical problems -- but I understood the expert to say a kid who sits stable at, say the 4% w for age, is not necessarily suffering (esp in the face of smooth height arc) but a kid below the 3% would be deemed compromised even if the height curve looked okay. I could have understood that wrong, but that was my understanding).

I throw in the details of my d to contrast with what I understand of yours. Your d is certainly below the 3% weight for age, so just looking at that, alone, that is very concerning whether it is long-standing but stable, or if arrived at through weight loss. Either situation is an issue as I understand it. SO….. I'd seek input from medical personnel and if it were me, I'd write up my concerns to have the provider read before you are seen. They need to have a clear plan of what they need to investigate with your d to ensure medical stability. Assuming she is stable (which she might well be, but you need to KNOW it), it seems some further assessment is needed to figure out WHY she is losing weight/not gaining on her normal curve. It could be something in addition to or other than ED. Or it could all be ED.

4. In the meantime, rather than engage her in discussions about her weight or whether she has an issue with her weight, gather data by making available favorite foods and see if what she does is historically appropriate — did she grow up on pizza and traditionally eat two slices? If yes, and she only eats two bites, make a note. Did she love ice cream sundaes but now will only partake if hers is low fat frozen yogurt, etc. It is entirely predictable that a person with an ED denies any weight or food concerns — sometimes it is subterfuge and sometimes they really, actually, truly, don't recognize it in themselves so are telling the truth, however misleading.

5. Does she have GI issues? Is she on any meds? Is there any ED in a biological family member? What have these people who know her and have voiced concerns say? Sometimes peers or coaches or friends' parents are in a position to notice trends like ditching lunch or not eating with the team, etc — if any of them have shed any light like that, rather than simply asking about her stature, note that info for the doctor too.

Note all of these sorts of things for the doctor and, again, I would have it written out along with info from this site and also your questions/concerns so the doctor can fully read it and maybe even research some based on it, before entering the room with your daughter. It does not seem to me like the sort of history you'd want to give in front of your daughter at this point.

6. We may not have really answered your initial question about understanding growth charts. Briefly, an individual's growth chart, if it has reliable data points, can be useful to show trends and can be used to show where that individual "should" be at a given time. Generally they are fairly smooth in a healthy, normal person. The differential in h and w percentiles, it seems to me, is not as important as if any one (or both) of those has swiftly changed or dramatically changed over time — thus most doctors' lack of concern over my daughter who is 53% h but 4% weight — she has been in that range for her whole life, which does not make it ideal, but thus far, and after extremely thorough testing to exclude lots of potential reasons for that differential, it does not signal ED or any organic disease we need to treat — but must closely monitor, for sure. So the important thing about the growth chart is that no one reading is itself very illuminating — with the possible exception of a reading like First Percentile weight for age, which may indeed be enough to signal a problem.

If you continue to read around here, even getting a kid back to their historical growth curve is not the end of the treatment — but is certainly the first and most essential pieces. After weight restoration, you then look beyond the growth chart to the "state" (behavior, mindset, attitude toward food, normalcy) of the individual and often it is found that a kid who tracked at, lets say the 60% w for age will need to be at the 70% w for age in order to maintain remission/recovery of an ED. The growth charts are certainly helpful in diagnosing and in guessing at weight goals, but they are not the whole story.

7. The other thing to stay cognizant of is: a. lots of good doctors miss EDs, so don't ignore this issue unless your doctor can otherwise explain what is going on; b. lots of kids' health is actually quite compromised and they are not medically stable at much higher weights/bmi than your d. As my d can attest, low bmi is not NECESSARILY dangerous, but a low or even "normal" bmi can be present in very unhealthy kids — it is the totality of the picture that needs to be considered. What I understand of your d's situation is concerning.

8. I hope some of this helps. Keep posting with questions. If you are not finding the links to review before the medical appt, that has tests suggested for a physician to take, let us know and someone will provide them.

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Mom of either pre-diagnosis or non-ed underweight 11 yoa kid here to learn how to achieve weight gain.  BMI steadily in the mid 12's for nearly her entire life.  Born 2006.
atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw0301


There must be be kids who are naturally this lean though - or am I kidding myself.


Maybe, but again if so, it should be her traditional arc not a newly established one through either weight loss or failure to gain on an previously established arc.  And even then, at a certain point I think there is such a thing as "too lean."  As I said, my d is thus far a "Less Than One Percenter" (bmi) and has the support of her doctors to be treated normally other than monitoring - and at least one "ED expert" concurred.  By way of full disclosure, another ED expert (again, nationally and ATDT Forum-endorsed) opined that at my d's numbers, she was too thin and needed to be re-fed regardless of whether ED or otherwise.  I am thus far not jumping on that advice, but certainly am aware of it and very closely monitor all aspects of my d's life to hopefully see any indicator that will bounce me into re-feeding mode.  NOTE, the doctor that said that was considering a "less than first percentile" bmi and a z-score of about -2.8 or so - which are equal to or slightly better scores than your d has, per the numbers you provided.  

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Mom of either pre-diagnosis or non-ed underweight 11 yoa kid here to learn how to achieve weight gain.  BMI steadily in the mid 12's for nearly her entire life.  Born 2006.
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #10 
As atdt31 has said, there are small possibilities that your D is meant to be this height and weight, only 0.12% of the girls her age are thinner, or another way 99.88% of girls her age have a higher BMI than your D. There are however red flags in your posting. Your D has been since her younger years around the 70th centile for height, she is now only the 34th centile. This may well be because of growth restriction related to inadequate intake. The drops in her weight centiles are also concerning. We can't diagnose here, but yes some urgent attention is needed. She may not have an eating disorder, but she definitely needs exclusion of other health issues too. 
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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
nw0301

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Reply with quote  #11 
Wow - I am blown away by the support - thank you so much to everyone and especially atdt31_US for your very informative post.

I think I understand and I will be taking her to the doctor for evaluation. I will be talking with her (Dr) on Wednesday and then hopefully seeing her with my daughter the following week.

In terms of watching her behaviours, it is really hard....she is so confusing. Sometimes she will refuse things she used to eat and then she gets quite angry and then ends up eating it anyway. I don't understand to be honest, its like she wants it but doesn't want to want it but eats it anyway....extremely occasionally she will refuse something she used to eat. She eats dessert every night but if we are home (most nights) she has switched to low fact ice cream instead of full fat but she will eat full fat if out (confusing!!)

Historically she has always looked thin, always been one of, if not the skinniest (not shortest) in the year group. I think since she ramped up her exercise (gradually over the last 2 years not overnight) she has gained muscle and got a bit taller but not really put on much weight. Nobody has said anything about discarding food but some friends (of hers) comment that she eats weirdly and then there are not so close friends who just come out and ask if she is anorexic. As an example of 'Weird' if she orders chicken caesar salad at school she gets it without egg, croutons or dressing - so basically chicken, lettuce and parmesan. Its not so weird to me as she has never liked eggs or salad dressing. Its a hard age though...they are all judging each other all the time.

GI issues - only recently (last 6 months) I have noticed she has diarrhoea probably once a week/fortnight but its not ongoing (hence the coeliac comments). History of ED - my mother suffered and is still incredibly weight conscious.

I guess when I write things down I can see that I should not be too relaxed about this but I am also really scared of creating something if there is nothing there.

I have done the checklist suggested by FoodSupport_AUS in readiness to take to DR and will try and read more before wednesday.

Thanks to all who have taken the time to reply, I really appreciate it

atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw0301
Wow - I am blown away by the support - thank you so much to everyone and especially atdt31_US for your very informative post.

I think I understand and I will be taking her to the doctor for evaluation. I will be talking with her (Dr) on Wednesday and then hopefully seeing her with my daughter the following week.

I will try and get a resting heart rate tonight, she often ends up in my bed as she has trouble sleeping so shouldn't be too hard.

In terms of watching her behaviours, it is really hard....she is so confusing. Sometimes she will refuse things she used to eat and then she gets quite angry and then ends up eating it anyway. I don't understand to be honest, its like she wants it but doesn't want to want it but eats it anyway....extremely occasionally she will refuse something she used to eat. She eats dessert every night but if we are home (most nights) she has switched to low fact ice cream instead of full fat but she will eat full fat if out (confusing!!)

Historically she has always looked thin, always been one of, if not the skinniest (not shortest) in the year group. I think since she ramped up her exercise (gradually over the last 2 years not overnight) she has gained muscle and got a bit taller but not really put on much weight. Nobody has said anything about discarding food but some friends (of hers) comment that she eats weirdly and then there are not so close friends who just come out and ask if she is anorexic. As an example of 'Weird' if she orders chicken caesar salad at school she gets it without egg, croutons or dressing - so basically chicken, lettuce and parmesan. Its not so weird to me as she has never liked eggs or salad dressing. Its a hard age though...they are all judging each other all the time. 

GI issues - only recently (last 6 months) I have noticed she has diarrhoea probably once a week/fortnight but its not ongoing (hence the coeliac comments). History of ED - my mother suffered and is still incredibly weight conscious. 

I guess when I write things down I can see that I should not be too relaxed about this but I am also really scared of creating something if there is nothing there.

I have done the checklist suggested by FoodSupport_AUS in readiness to take to DR and will try and read more before wednesday.

Thanks to all who have taken the time to reply, I really appreciate it 



Good morning.  The information in this post, in my opinion, raises the index of suspicion for an ED. I can't recall exactly, but i think some experts put a genetic predisposition at somewhere around 70% of the "cause" of an ED.  Generally if you are genetically predisposed, you can be triggered in many subtle ways and go undetected with an ED for a LONG time until things go quickly downhill.  

I am still unclear if she has LOST weight to get to where she is, or has she STOPPED GAINING to be where she is?  Either way, based on your last post, I would consider trying to talk to the doctor, or drop off a written note with your concerns, in the next two days and taking your d in Wednseday.  

it is hard to know when to monitor and when to act, but there are parents on this board who will tell you their kid was very compromised (some literally at death's door) a levels higher than your d's weight and bmi percentiles.  Perhaps the doctor could do a quick vitals check on Wednesday (orthostatic bp, pulse, temp, look for lanugo and other physical signs of malnutrition that go beyond simple weight/height values). 

Thinking of you and totally understand the fear of making too much of nothing, versus getting help when there is evidence of a problem.  Based on the picture as I understand it, I think I'd err on the side of seeking intervention/assessment sooner than later.  

Keep her eating and keep her hydrated until you can get her in!  And I'd keep her out of sport until then as well I think.  


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Mom of either pre-diagnosis or non-ed underweight 11 yoa kid here to learn how to achieve weight gain.  BMI steadily in the mid 12's for nearly her entire life.  Born 2006.
atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #13 
nw0301 -- not sure what is going on with formatting right now. To read what I wrote, click on the pencil on the top right of my response box and it will be quoted in a reply box  -- you'll be able to read the whole post.  Basically -- go to doctor soon than later with your d.  High suspicion for ED and very low levels for her suggest not assuming she is just meant to be this long and lean and very real and serious health consequence can occur very quickly if indeeds she has been restricting a long time and is at 1% w for age when that has not been her traditional arc.
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Reply with quote  #14 
nw0301 --

There might be some reasons why your daughter doesn't want to eat the egg, crouton and salad dressing off of her Caesar salad that make sense to you.   But how many times a day, with different foods, is this type of thing happening?   You say she puts some butter on her sandwiches -- but you also say she only eats bread on the weekends, so she's only putting the butter on 2/7 days.

Do you have a sense of how many calories a day she is eating?   You say she is an athlete and muscular.   From what I have read teen athletes need a LOT of calories.  Depending on the sport, 14 year old girls could easily need 2500 to 3000 calories per day, maybe even more.   She could be eating dessert (low fat at home as you say, only full fat when out) and the occasional piece of chocolate and a salad and a bowl of cereal etc.... and still have a 500 calorie deficit each day relative to what she needs.

From what I have read, certain high energy sports can put a child more at risk for creating an energy imbalance.   They start to exercise more and just can't keep up with the calorie intake, and that imbalance can start to trigger the anorexia.   


 
Torie

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Reply with quote  #15 
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I wanted to respond to a few of your comments - I italicized yours and put mine in between

GI issues - only recently (last 6 months) I have noticed she has diarrhoea probably once a week/fortnight

Is there any chance she is using laxatives?  That's a common AN thing (to do secretly).

She generally chooses healthier food options,,,She eats dessert every night but if we are home (most nights) she has switched to low fact ice cream instead of full fat but she will eat full fat if out (confusing!!)

Your d is 13, right?  In your shoes, I would not want my 13-year-old making food choices - it's very common and normal for the mom to make the choices.  And, personally, I would only be buying full-fat ice cream, and requiring her (if requiring such a thing is necessary) to eat it.

TO be honest I would probably not be as worried but for the comments by others and now by her...Nobody has said anything about discarding food but some friends (of hers) comment that she eats weirdly and then there are not so close friends who just come out and ask if she is anorexic.

Are these people making comments directly to you?  Friends are often the first to know that something is amiss.  I speak from experience here - my first signals were the calls I received from the moms of concerned friends.  (I will be forever grateful - so grateful - to them, but that is another story.)  You're right that it's altogether too common for teen girls to eat weirdly, but that's all the more reason to be concerned - even in a sea of teen-girl-eating-ness, her friends apparently think her weird eating is notable.  Yikes.

History of ED - my mother suffered

OK, even if your d doesn't currently have an ED, she is likely vulnerable.  All the more reason to ditch the low-cal (so-called "healthy" but oh how I hate that term) foods and ensuring that she eats what she needs.

I'm so glad you are asking these questions.  Please feel free to keep asking as many as you like. xx

-Torie

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Reply with quote  #16 
HI nw0301,

It's great that you are tackling this now. I wish you an informative and supportive doctors visit. One thing I would suggest if the visit is inconclusive is to reschedule an appointment for every 2 weeks to track you d's weight/height and health. Remember if she is not gaining weight at this age she is losing weight. She needs to fuel activity, growth and puberty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nw0301
GI issues - only recently (last 6 months) I have noticed she has diarrhoea probably once a week/fortnight but its not ongoing (hence the coeliac comments). History of ED - my mother suffered and is still incredibly weight conscious.

In addition to the other suggestions for GI issues there are also parasites (eg dientamoeba fragilis) that cause reduction in appetite and bowel issues. Remember someone can have both, parasite and ED!

EDs are 40%-60% genetic. Looking around our family there are no diagnosed EDs but definitely underweight people with unusual eating habits!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nw0301
I guess when I write things down I can see that I should not be too relaxed about this but I am also really scared of creating something if there is nothing there.

Oh God, this is my biggest regret. That I was afraid of making a mountain out of a molehill and waited longer than necessary to get help. I think there are enough red flags in your case. Learn from my mistake and go for it!

Let us know how you get on at the doc. Even if there is no definitive diagnosis we can give you lots of tips and tricks to help get her weight up. You don't need a doc's permission to feed you kid what you know is best for her.

Warm wishes,

D



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Mother of 13yo son restricting but no body image issues; inpatient 6 wks Sept/Oct 2015 but lost weight! So emotionally destroyed they agreed to let him home to us. Stable but no progress. Medical hosp to kick start recovery for Feb 2016. Slowly and cautiously gaining weight at home and seeing signs of our real kid. Hovering around WR. Mood great, mostly. Building up hour by hour at school after 18 months at home. 

Swedish proverb: Love me when I least deserve it because that's when I need it most.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence Recovery, then, is not an act but a habit. Aristotle.

If the plan doesn't work, change the plan but never the goal. (but don't give up on the plan too soon, maybe it just needs a tweak or a bit more time and determination [wink] )

atdt31_US

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Reply with quote  #17 
Other info the doctor would likely want to know:

*What is her Tanner stage?  Has she started menstruating?  Did she get to a point of having regular periods?  Does she currently get a period?  

If she was on the early-side and had a regular period established and it has stopped, that is useful info.  But your d is young enough she may not have started and/or may just be starting and thus starts and stops are not necessarily as significant.  Then it will become a question of whether she is delayed - which can happen at low weights.  

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Mom of either pre-diagnosis or non-ed underweight 11 yoa kid here to learn how to achieve weight gain.  BMI steadily in the mid 12's for nearly her entire life.  Born 2006.
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This forum is sponsored by F.E.A.S.T., an organization of parents serving parents and caregivers of patients of all ages with anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders. Information and advice given on this forum does not necessarily represent the policy or opinion of F.E.A.S.T. or its volunteers and is meant to support, not replace, professional consultation.

F.E.A.S.T. is registered as a nonprofit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code.

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