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Sotired

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Reply with quote  #26 
I have been reading what you are writing iwanttohelp and honestly,I'm starting to feel a bit annoyed.all of us on here-all of us-have lived this day after day and in some cases year after year.your persistence with the thought that this has to be caused by trauma is unfair and untrue.
The biggest trauma my d has ever gone through is anorexia.before then she was a normal,high acieving loving young teen.during her illness she lied,spat,hurt me,her dad,cut herself,tried committing suicide, refused to eat,drink,swallow her own spit.
She COULD NOT HELP HERSELF.without us stepping in,without trying at FBT,moving to NG tube feeding, continuous hospital stays,my d would not be alive and thriving today.
We worked.we worked damn hard.we made mistakes.we corrected those mistakes.prof ssionals made mistakes.we corrected those mistakes.we wrapped her from wrist to shoulder,ankle to thigh in bandages to stop her hurting herself.we learned to take away the art trolley if she was unattended.we learned that my child needed us even when she hated us.even when she said we did nothing.
You need to understand-they don't see all the meetings,because they aren't there.they don't hear the therapists blaming a parent and the parent having to point out that they have parented two other children perfectly fine-that hey,maybe this biologically based illness is at fault-not me.
One of the things I would love every single therapist to have to do is spend a full month with a family living with an anorexic and their family.i would love to see how their advice would change then!and it would.
My child wouldn't sit at the table,wouldn't eat.she would run away.she would pretend to sleep.
It is ever so easy to judge what you haven't lived through yourself as a caregiver to someone whose illness tells them we are evil and awful.we still get up day after day,and we do what has to be done-often with no support.professionals listen to our kids tell them how evil we are andseem to be inclined to believe them.i have been through some very rough times with my d,but I have no doubts that for now at least,I have helped save her life.my thread is available on the forum.you can read it, see what I was working with as well as my ds illness-and then make a judgement call.but I promise you that until it's your child, you won't know what it's like.sometimes I still have flashbacks to scrubbing blood off walls,having things thrown at me, wondering if I would survive this myself,let alone be able to save my d.dont tell me about the poisonous things you have listened to from very very sick kids and treat it like they are telling the truth.mostly they aren't because they can't.if they admit we are loving then they admit that they are sick.almost no anorexic I've ever hea d of can admit they have anorexia til much further down the line.
If you come here- then come without judgement.professionals know such a small slice of this life...we know so much more about having to actually live it.

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Torie

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Reply with quote  #27 
Sotired, Please be nice.  She has been taught things by her professors and other professionals in Germany, and now she is giving us this wonderful chance to help her see what it looks like from a different vantage point.  Precious.

Personally, I think it's great that someone from a non-FBT country has dropped in for a chat. xx

-Torie

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Sotired

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Reply with quote  #28 
I wasn't being cruel.the reality is different for us and respect works two ways.there is too much yes but.. coming through for me in her replies.she needs to also realise that patients lie and exaggerate-it's part of the illness.at the moment I feel that she is looking at it too much from the patients side,not enough from the caregivers side.
This is,in the end ,a caregiver forum.whilst it is good she wishes to learn,she needs to see that this constant yes but is wearying.we are not the enemy of our child but their very best advocate.my feeling is that she just doesn't get that,or indeed,want to either.

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Sotired42
iwanttohelp

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Reply with quote  #29 
Thank you all!!

I dont want to offend or annoy anyone of you.
Maybe i didnt make clear how much i adore your day-to-day work with your children. I have read stories on here from parents who gave up so much for their child and still do and try to manage this fight with patience and love. It must be incredible hard, especially as a parent of course you are so emotional bonded to the child, while we as pros have more distance. So please do you never think i dont see the great work you do!

One reason for me to come to this forum actually is and was, to learn more about the FBT and doing-it at-home-thing, bc this is so rare here in G. I want to learn, how it may be possible to transfer experiences from one "side" to the other - in both directions! I want to learn how i can help (one day) families to help their children, what is helpfull and what not so much. I want to see every person of this system in his/her needings and trying to find out, what me as a therapist could do to give enough support to get through.

I know, that i live luckily in a country with a real good healthsystem and healthcare. Families are lucky to have the oppurtunity to afford their children stays in special treatment centers, sometimes they stay for several months (most of them do, tbh) and not to worry about the costs.

But i think there still is a gap for what happens when the children come home afterwards. There are GPs and therapists, but e.g, we do not have a system similar to CAMHS.
And yes, i see/saw a lot of children relapse within only short periods of time, what usually leeds to another long hospital stay.
For me its interesting to learn how this can be prevented? What helps the sufferer, what helps the family? Therefore i want to speak to every party of this - the parents and the sufferers.

This year there has been a fabolous online comic about a girl developing AN (she does not experience any big trauma fyi ;-)). Unfortunatly it is only in German. It approaches at teens and young adults, trying to rise awreness for ED. The story is told about like 8 years i think. Its really good made and it shows this girl going in and out treatment and therapy, gaining, relapsing BUT STILL GROWING IN SOME WAYS until in the end she is in kind of remission, maybe not perfectly, but she manages her life. I give you the link, as it is a comic it may be understable by pictures. It has been developed with gouvernmental support.

What i want to say: this is kind of typical story i have seen. Seldom i saw a sufferers story like: loosing weight (for what reasons so ever), getting very sick, being fed (where ever, by whom ever), gaining back the lost weight/maybe more, getting psychical better, reaching remission, being cured.

Its not as easy - nevermind if you put one in treatment centers or feed them at home.
When i read on ATDT of families who do this home feeding for YEARS and if they wouldnt the sufferer would streight away go and skip meals....i think this is exactly what happens if i see a relapse. So your children and my patients are at the same place: they are NOT able to take over the responsibility for her illness, even if they are at a healthy weight aND GOOD NOURISHED. Left alone, they will relapse.

And THIS is what interests me!

Why? How to prevend? How to help?

So yes: in some ways we are not at so different places :-)

Have a good day and still sorry for my long posts and miserable english...


The comic:
https://ninette.berlin/mainsite/index.html?gclid=CjwKEAjw8OLGBRCklJalqKHzjQ0SJACP4BHrDxmIxSdtwTYGVNp5gfOsJHlTcRfBxfKFmTe1wCQZAhoCbmfw_wcB
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #30 
Hi iwanttohelp,

Quote
"ts not as easy - nevermind if you put one in treatment centers or feed them at home.

When i read on ATDT of families who do this home feeding for YEARS and if they wouldnt the sufferer would streight away go and skip meals....i think this is exactly what happens if i see a relapse. So your children and my patients are at the same place: they are NOT able to take over the responsibility for her illness, even if they are at a healthy weight aND GOOD NOURISHED. Left alone, they will relapse.

And THIS is what interests me! 

Why? How to prevend? How to help?"
Unquote.


The answer is that the caregiver takes control of the meal preparation, and plating, and ensuring regular meals (3 meals and 3 snacks), for a very long time.
By a long time I mean often around 3 years, sometimes less, sometimes more.
The only job the sufferer has is to eat the meals, to pass the guilt and responsibility to the carer, until their brain is healed enough that they can think logically and take care of themselves.
It takes a very long time, the sufferer cannot chose to just take control and heal, the person's brain is malfunctioning and food is the medicine.

Some therapy for coping and life skills can work, and coping skills for family members (empowering, and supporting the carer and family) can work, depending on the setting.

aLL In my opinion...

PS . I like this blog from Dr Ravin,
http://www.blog.drsarahravin.com/category/parenting/page/2/

Best wishes
TF


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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) ,  Now Phase  2 , making progress every day. Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT.
Sotired

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Reply with quote  #31 
I'm not sure that you can head off a relapse,but maybe if you can get the feeding done really quickly it would be possible?it can be hard-if you take your eye off things for a week, sometimes that's all it takes for ed to grab hold again.
I think it's about being open to all the options .fbt is great for children and adults who are at some level receptive to it.for us, our d was not so we had to use alternatives-hospital and tube feeds.they have to be willing at some point when you are sitting with them,to open their mouths and eat-if not then that's where hospital and tube feeds come in.sometimes residential care.
There can be a danger in assigning blame to parents if FBT doesn't work.in an ideal world parents would have a session alone with the therapist first to actually learn how to model FBT.we honestly had no clue at first as our advice we were given was "you know how to feed your child".
Well,yes and no.i knew how to feed a normal,willing child, but not one in the grips of an illness where she seemed to think I was trying to poison her by getting her to eat.
What I needed then was ideas on how to effectively model FBT to get my d past her fear.
In the end as every case is individual,maybe it's ok just to have no 'one size fits all' approach.
FBT works for some,not for others.in my country I would like there to be the two options-one of FBT and then if that doesn't work, the option of rapid hospitalisation and treatment via NG.
After weight restoration,then cbt and/or DBT to learn better coping skills.
That's my dream
Not sure if it answers any questions though...

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toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #32 
Hi iwanttohelp,

I think it is great that you have reached out to help these people.
The great thing about this forum is there are people here with lots of different family circumstances.
There is so much experience here that it is likely the scenerio has been seen here before, or at least a similar situation.

There are many many carers here that have used versions of FBT ( myself included), and versions of, or modified maudsley etc...
Nothing is ever straightforward, especially with this illness!!


I am uncomfortable with people only getting treatment that "want to get better" or have insight.I have a real problem with this.

Here is a quote that I 100% agree with from ED advocate and founder of ATDT  Laura Collins, and it explains itself in 2 lines!!!.
"Patients with anorexia are often "anosognosic" - they truly do not feel ill and they experience their own behaviors and thoughts as normal. This is not a choice or conscious denial - it is a brain condition. This anosognosia is dangerous on many levels, but frightening when it guides policies or public opinion.

quote
"But the d of this mother DOES NOT WANT TO CHANGE.
And this is new to me. That someone just does not want to get better."

I have never met or come across anybody with this illness, at a low bmi, that " wants " to get better. This is the difficult part of the illness.
The brain is not functioning and is causing distortion in thinking. The person needs nutritional rehabilitation first, to help repair the brain.
This takes time.
Without this, there can be no recovery....FOOD is her medicine.

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) ,  Now Phase  2 , making progress every day. Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #33 
A Way to think about this in simple terms would be, that her brain is so impaired, that it would be similar to asking an autistic person to stop being autistic!
Eating disorders ARE NOT A CHOICE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Did you get to watch the very important video that Kali posted?
Here is another one that may help your knowledge.

Thanks TF 

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) ,  Now Phase  2 , making progress every day. Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT.
Kali

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Reply with quote  #34 
Hi I want to help,

I really feel for the parent you are describing. I had a lot of support from therapists during the worst of my d's AN and it was very helpful. 

Here are some resources for you:

http://train2treat4ed.com/  
The training site for FBT classes. 
(if you can come to the US you could be trained in FBT and add that to your other treatment modalities.[smile] Since FBT is not commonly done in Germany you could really make a difference for families if you also had this training!

Here is a link to the FBT treatment manual if you want to order and read it.

https://www.amazon.com/Treatment-Manual-Anorexia-Nervosa-Second/dp/1462523463/ref=pd_sbs_14_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=CHMEKPSK7XEE7TCP0Q1N

and Eva Musby's website: She has good tips on how to get a child to eat. Perhaps show this to the parent. I think Eva also consults with parents who are having difficulty getting their child to eat. Maybe have the parent also have some sessions with her?

http://evamusby.co.uk/

and her book:
https://www.amazon.com/Anorexia-other-Eating-Disorders-compassionate/dp/0993059805

Anorexia and Eating Disorders How to help your child eat well and be well.

There is a wealth of information on this board. SoTired is a great person to talk with about a child who doesn't want to get well and SoTired never gave up no matter what she had to do and her daughter is doing much better now. Also look at Deenl's threads she is in the Netherlands and she had a superresistor who she took out of the hospital because he did not gain weight there and fed at home and her son is improving now. Torie was able to help her daughter recover and her d. is doing very well now. Toothfairy's son was very ill and in the hospital for months and he is also doing really well now. In all these cases the parents fed fed fed, and worked hard to make sure their kid had the appropriate treatment whether it was tube feeding or fbt at home or hospitalization, the food went in. 

The illness cannot let the sufferers be motivated to get well for a long time and sometimes sufferers don't even think there is anything wrong with them! My understanding is that those are symptoms of the disorder. 

Quote:
But the "total restrictors" as they were called on ATDT are not admitted at these centers bc the whole systems based on the free will of the patients to accept help. So my experiences were mainly with sufferers who WANT TO CHANGE in which way soever. 



This is just sad. And also incorrect.

Also, I find it sad that the professionals are blaming this on a parent's divorce. Divorces don't cause eating disorders. Imagine that you had a child who had cancer and could die and the doctor thought your divorce was to blame. How would you feel and what would you think about that doctor? You would probably think that they were completely stupid. Well, I believe it is no different when your child has an ED. 

You can help empower the parent to take charge and help her d. when she comes home AND while she is in treatment. Give her confidence in her abilities to help because no one loves her child the way she does, and empower her to learn to be able to feed her daughter and give her hope by enouraging her to be able to take action on her daughter's behalf. There have been many single moms on this board who have been able to help their kids. 

Quote:
The d is 14 and was tube fed for months, now she is free since 3 weeks with supervised meals.Her BMI is around 15 - she didn't gain much within these 8 months!!


Why would they let the girl out with a bmi of 15? How and who is supervising the meals and is she eating?
If she didn't gain much in those 8 months then the treatment center and her doctors/therapists failed her miserably.

Best wishes and keep asking questions!

Kali


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Kali

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Reply with quote  #35 
Hi I want to help

I thought of a couple more books you could encourage the parent to read. Not sure if they are translated into german. But both are books written by parents who helped their child get well. Also if you want to refer her to this board, you are actually able to go in and edit/delete your posts so that she will not see them.

Eating with Your Anorexic by Laura Collins

https://www.amazon.com/Eating-Your-Anorexic-Mothers-Memoir/dp/0692329951

Brave Girl Eating
https://www.amazon.com/Brave-Girl-Eating-Struggle-Anorexia/dp/006172548X/ref=pd_sbs_14_t_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=G1FW0SSBSV50X8GPFQ3N

Kali

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mjkz

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Reply with quote  #36 

Quote:
2. Sotired i would appreciate, if you talk directly with me, if you feel annoyed or offended. Its not nice to talk about ones head if you know he or she will read it. I think, this counts in every language or country. Thanks.


She is talking to you.  With all due respect, please remember who this forum is for and what your role here is.  Many of us have had health professionals who think just like you do and our kids suffered for it.  Treating only those who are "motivated" to change is very old school and crazy in my opinion. I've yet to meet someone who has anorexia who is motivated to gain weight (without external motivations).  We require our kids to eat.   FBT has the highest success rate of any treatment out there.  Granted it doesn't work with all families and all kids but most of us have had to cobble together many different treatments and run with what works.  Regardless of what we offer you, you will go out into practice and have to find your own way as we did. 

Quote:
Unfortunatly it is only in German.


Only if you don't choose the English version [biggrin]  I read it in German before seeing that.

Quote:
The d is 14 and was tube fed for months, now she is free since 3 weeks with supervised meals.Her BMI is around 15 - she didnt gain much within these 8 months!!


With lots of therapy though right? This is exactly what happened to my daughter.  When the option was therapy with insight and then weight gain-we went months with no weight gain but great insight!!  I vote for the weight gain and no insight.  You get no brain healing without the weight gain and some kids never get the insight.  They can still go on and lead very normal lives. 

Recovery can look very different for each person.  For my daughter, recovery has been eating no  matter what she feels and dealing with the thoughts that don't go away.  She knows what she sees in the mirror is not accurate and so she ignores it now.  She never regained hunger cues so she eats on a schedule but she eats.  She is dealing with her trauma issues, working, volunteering, etc.  She has a very full life and for her that is recovery.  She still has the thoughts but she doesn't let them derail her anymore.

Torie

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Reply with quote  #37 
I think my d's story is important as an example of how treatment could work, and should work, but sadly, almost never does work.  

The difference for my d was that we got help early.  Just like with cancer or diabetes or most any other illness, acting promptly made all the difference.  She was losing weight fast, had terrible guilt about eating, was obsessed with weight/calories, and was lying about her eating (which was completely out of character for this formerly honest kid).  Perhaps most telling was the ED look in her eyes - do you know what I mean?  I think some call it "dead eyes," and it gives me chills just to remember that look.

Anyway, I was lucky (so lucky!) to find this forum early on, so I could start requiring full nutrition even at a time that my d's doctor told her her weight was fine.

Eating was hell for my d.  It was even worse after that ignorant doctor told her she didn't need to gain any more weight.

She didn't want to get better because she didn't think she deserved to live.  Heartbreaking.  I got her a nice therapist, but if that helped, it didn't help much.  What helped was getting her weight back up to where it needed to be - to where it had previously been - in spite of the bad advice we received from her doctor.  Luckily, we are near enough to CHOP (world-class children's hospital) that we were able to take my d there.  She was diagnosed with AN and basically told to eat what we gave her, and told that she did, in fact, need to gain more weight.  

We didn't go to CHOP for FBT every week because we didn't need to.  (The reason we went there at all was that my d's doctor had undermined us terribly by telling my d she didn't need to gain more weight, and it was tremendously helpful to be able to take her to a true expert - instead of a general physician - who SUPPORTED me instead of undermining me.)

All along the way, my d would tell anyone who asked that she had great friends, a great family, an excellent school, two really nice dogs ... and that it was so so wrong for her to have all this, as it should have given been someone who would actually appreciate it.  She was never bullied; she never experienced or witnessed abuse or violence; she was a much-loved child in an intact family. 

And then her brain decided to kill her.

Most people don't know that she had/has AN.  They think we are a model family.  Maybe they are right. xx

-Torie



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Sotired

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Reply with quote  #38 
My second post was general iwanttohelp-that means that it was just about what I and some of the parents here had experienced whilst getting treatment-an unwillingness of professionals to see what wasn't working and to change it,but rather a tendency to blame parents when things didn't work.customarily I don't contact anyone privately, and with all due respect,I didn't and don't need to with you either.
Thanks mj and Kali for helping me out there.iwanttolearn,you wanted thoughts and opinions, mine is just one.you don't have to take it on board if you don't want to.the advice given here is to take or leave as you desire.
As it happens by the by ,my d had most of her treatment being tube fed and now has gastroparesis, so is still constantly tube fed.on a personal level,I dealt with some truly awful help,I have had to fight the system in my country endlessly.my d may well die an early death, though I hope not, with the complications caused by anorexia.on top of that I have two other children with special needs.my response to you met the rules of the forum and I have nothing to apologise for.my life is stressful enough.you don't have to love what I write to you-but I am on the inside looking out.its a much harder place to be than yours.
My thread is 'on the merry-go-round' and ironically talks all about fighting the system and finding professionals who would help,not hinder me and how to tube feed your child-both of which the child you are treating needs.its frightening to take on the system and I certainly didn't want to but my child's needs came first.i would come here, ask for support and then get on with my job of saving my d.the word tenacious is for any parent who has to fight the way I did.i didn't have to go to court but I was ready to if that's what it took to get my d treatment-and your parents that you are helping may need to too.their divorce complicates things but certainly hasn't caused the anorexia so they could show the current research if they needed to in court.
They could also travel to a different country perhaps for treatment if they could afford it?i have heard the uscd course is very good in the US.it often helps families get on the same page with treatment.
Good luck

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Torie

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iwanttohelp
But the d of this mother DOES NOT WANT TO CHANGE.
And this is new to me. That someone just does not want to get better.
The other patients i met so far  want to "get better", but often they dont want to let her ED go. But they want to "get better" - meaning they feel the pain of their ED.
This d does not want to "get better" or change a thing.
I feel helpless.


I will never forget coming to this forum as the mom of a kid who did not want to get better.  Hopefulmama replied that even if my d didn't want to get better, I could still bring her back - she had done that herself.  It gave me so much hope to read that!

I have been on this forum exactly three years today.  (Happy anniversary to me?)   I often think about how interesting it would be to analyze our various journeys.  When someone new drops in and says their kid doesn't want to get better, I think, "That's OK."  When they say their husband isn't on board with treatment, I think, "How can we help get the h on board?"  If they can't get the h on board, I think, "How can we help get the h out of the way so the mom can do this?" When they say their kid has a BMI around 15, I think ... "Man oh man, I hope you have a good treatment team because getting that kid back to a healthy weight is going to be one heck of a tough job."

If this family were in the US, I would be listing the treatment centers with the best reputations and encouraging the mom to call.  If the kid is already in a treatment center that isn't getting the weight up at a good clip, I would encourage her to do whatever she can to A) Get that team to up their game or B) Transfer her somewhere else.

I think you have said yourself that they (sometimes?) need to regain weight before they can have insight.   

I'm asking you to consider the possibility that we are right:  The top priority right now is that this girl needs to gain weight.  And if you agree, the question becomes - How do we make that happen? xx

-Torie
 

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mjkz

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
@mjkz: no she didnt. She wrote about me using the 3rd person "she". If things havent changed recently in English, the direct talking would be: "you". Correct me if i am wrong ;-)


She was referring to you as Sie rather than du.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
This is not the honorific. Pls dont take me as a fool just bc i am not a native speaker.


I can tell you with 100% honestly that my opinion of you was formed not in your command of the language but the content of your posts.  Good luck and hopefully someday you can bring some of the wisdom you learned here to your own country's way of dealing with eating disorders.
meadow

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Reply with quote  #42 
Really, really interesting thread.

I'm also glad that you popped by iwanttohelp.  I've read the discussion and just to add my two pennies worth.....

My daughter is eight and is recovering well from anorexia.  This is because of FOOD.  For a long time the idea of 'getting better' actually made her worse, and I'm afraid to say that even the most kind, empathic, fun, loving, non-judgemental therapist still wouldn't have had any success at all in getting her to talk about what's going on for her.

There's been no trauma in her life.  I can't say that with 100% certainty, obviously, because she's not under my care 24/7. However... I really am completely sure there hasn't.  The most traumatic thing that's happened to my daughter (apart from having anorexia) is moving city, and although that was definitely stressful and may well have contributed to the onset of her ED, I wouldn't call that a trauma or a 'deeper issue'.

I'm a child clinical psychologist and I work in a CAMHS team.  I don't work with children/young people with anorexia myself, however I did my doctoral thesis on core beliefs in eating disorders and thought of myself as fairly knowledgeable.  Absolutely all of that knowledge went completely out of the window when I was faced with a child who was terrified of eating, spat, kicked, screamed, hit, said she hated me, threw things at me and banged her head against the wall at mealtimes.  It often took two hours to get her to even have a bite.  The only thing that helped was persistence with the food (along with the wise words from the people on this forum, who really do know what they're talking about).  I agree with someone above (Sotired, I think), and I wish all therapists could spend a month living with someone with AN to get a real life perspective.

I am sure that you are going to be a fantastic therapist; you seem open minded and it's wonderful that you've come here to learn.  I wish you all the best and hope our experiences are useful to you. 

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Reply with quote  #43 
By the way, iwanttohelp, I think it would be great if you recommend this forum to the mother you spoke about. Many of us will attest to the support and ideas here being an absolute lifeline. Our family's therapists didn't/couldn't tell us how to get D to eat, but the people here who've been through it had suggestions that we followed, with great results so far.

If you're worried about being identified then you can go back and edit some of your posts, because please don't forget this is a caregiver forum!

mjkz

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Reply with quote  #44 
Quote:
1. Has anyone experiences with blood work getting worse (liver) with olanzapine or/and children only fed with supplements for months?


Liver enzyme elevation is a well known side effect of all antipsychotics like olanzapine.

Quote:
greek yogurt, which is only the half of the cals of the drink


She needs twice the amount then.

iwanttohelp

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Reply with quote  #45 
Yes meadow you are probably right....my intentions were only to collect helpful information to work out a plan that could help the family. But it is too difficult anyway bc the situations are so different over here and as long as the d is still at the ward there is nothing really senseful bc the medicals are in charge.

@mjkz: she didnt
Playball40

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Posts: 249
Reply with quote  #46 
OH great.  I get to be the poster child of crazy parent over there.  Good thing I have a thick skin.

I won't feel badly about doing for my child what the doctors, nutritionists, therapists, hospitals et al couldn't do, which is simple - help my daughter gain weight. 

Funny, no one over there would think twice if a parent of an overweight child substituted skim milk for whole - in fact they would applaud it.  Ah well.  We live in cynical world these days.

I'm grateful for ATDT for how it has offered guidance, support and empathy through this painful journey. 

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Caroline
meadow

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Reply with quote  #47 
Playball, I think you're awesome.  I found it very, very sad reading that website. x 
Playball40

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Posts: 249
Reply with quote  #48 
Aww, thanks Meadow.  [smile]

Yes, I found it sad too.  I have to think they are very young over there.

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Caroline
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