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tina72

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Reply with quote  #1 
At which point did the body schema disorder change/stop at your kids?
My d is now wr for about 2 months and I desparately wait for this to stop.I cannot hear her complaining about her "fat tummy" any more... am I too impatient? Surely. When does that stop?
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am sorry Tina, but I don't quite understand what you mean by body schema disorder? 
When I have searched for body schema it appears to be related to the ability to assess the body's position. 

Do you mean body dysmorphia? that is inability to see the body as it really is. For us it is an ongoing issue, though it is much less than in the past. 

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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #3 
That is a traslation problem, I´ll try to change the topic: I mean what you call body dysmorphia, in german it has another name.
Tina72
tina72

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Reply with quote  #4 
Does anyone know how I can change the topic name?
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Reply with quote  #5 


To change the topic title go to your first post. Then hit the edit button.
You then need to click on USE FULL EDITOR and the option to change the title will come up. 


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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks!
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Tina,
For us , his dietitian had set his target bmi/weight too low for him at bmi 19 so he still had a lot of symptoms at this low weight.

It wasnt until we fired the dietitian & pushed him up to bmi 24/25 that the symptoms faded, including the dysmorphia.

Strangely, as the weight went higher, the less he cared about it.
Do you think your Daughter is fully weight restored?

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) , Then FBT at home since.and making progress every day. He is now in good recovery, and Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not completely out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time.
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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) , Then FBT at home since.and making progress every day. He is now in good recovery, and Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not completely out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi toothfairy,
I also think the target weight is still too low and we must push her up a bit. I just don´t know if it only depends on weight or if there is a time factor, too. It is better already since she reached the target weight but it is not fully absend.
Tina72
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #10 
Best of luck, for us- once we went to a much higher weight the change was rapid..ie weeks.
That was just my experience.

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) , Then FBT at home since.and making progress every day. He is now in good recovery, and Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not completely out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #11 
Tina, for some it never disappears. My daughter still has body dysmorphia but the difference is she knows she can't trust what she sees and she eats anyway.  I think people have this mistaken belief that a person who has had an eating disorder has to love their body or they will never be well.  That isn't true. I know very few people who truly love their body but they still live pretty full happy lives and don't starve themselves to death.  At a higher weight, the thoughts are far less intrusive and don't dominant her thinking 24/7 now but they are still there.  She lives in spite of them.
admum

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hi my D had Ednos and also Body dysmorphia syndrome. The BDD was a separate diagnosis made once she had received FBT for the ED and stopped purging. Her BDD was not just about weight and size and hence not just a symptom of an ED but a true separate disorder . Her BDD covered multiple areas even such as her hair, ears, eyebrows . I listened to the mums here and pushed for a much higher bmi and I'm convinced it made a difference to her recovery. Technically she is overweight but she is a UK size 8 at 16, curvy and beautiful. And she loves what she sees in the mirror! She was rated as having severe BDD when we started this journey. She had specialist CBT for the BDD which she needed. i think she needed both higher bmi and specialised cbt.
Mamaroo

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Tina

There is a chapter in Julie O'Toole's book "Give food a chance" written by Jasniece Desocio and now I'm quoting just directly from the book:

"If the dopamine communication network misfires, it can result in a variety of very frightening symptoms. Delusions and hallucinations result from dysregulation of dopamine in the limbic networks of the brain. We see the effects of this in anorexia nervosa, when delusions take the for of distorted thoughts of body size and shape. These distorted thought can take on frightening proportions, such as believing the body is insidiously depositing large globules of fat with each mouthful of food, or believing the air and environment are contaminated by evil trans-fats that can be absorbed through the skin (more than one very young child has reported having this particular fear). Some of our patients with severe anorexia nervosa report auditory hallucinations; hearing "a voice" that forbids them to eat and punishes them with incessant accusations of weakness or failure when they eat even miniscule amounts of food."

It further describes that the symptoms worsen with malnourishment and that medications such as second-generation antipsychotics (olanzapine) reduce these delusions and that they lessen with a healthy body weight, but can take between 6 to 9 months.

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D became obsessed with exercise at age 9. Started eating 'healthy' at age 9.5. Restricting couple of months later. IP for 2 weeks at age 10. Slowly refed for a year and WR at age 11. Challenging fear foods now.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hi Tina
I just came across this, & thought you may be interested

http://www.mirror-mirror.org/body-dysmorphic-disorder.htm#sthash.kfz4PZbu.uxfs

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) age 13 in October 2015 ,  (4 months immediate inpatient) , Then FBT at home since.and making progress every day. He is now in good recovery, and Living life to the full like a normal teen. We are not completely out of the woods yet, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thanks for all your replies. As it is better already since her weight is "restored" (I will push it a few pounds more in the next weeks) I think I will have to wait a bit and be patient. I have seen so much change in the last months and that is something I really wait for, because I hate that regular touching her tummy after every meal wether it is "fat" or not. I think she mostly accepted what she looks like but she is still not content with her tummy.
Tina72
Foodsupport_AUS

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Reply with quote  #16 
Tina this is probably going to be hard reading for you since English is not your first language, but it is a great journal article looking at how symptoms change over time with treatment. http://www.blog.drsarahravin.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Weight-restoration-and-broader-recovery1.pdf  

In summary it says that many of the psychological symptoms improve with weight gain and time, but that eating concerns and dietary restraint improved the most with weight gain. Depression improved over time with or without weight gain. Weight and shape concerns however were less amenable to change, and that those at higher weights had more weight concerns. 

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D diagnosed restrictive AN June 2010 age 13.5. Weight restored July 2012. Relapse and now clawing our way back. Treatment: multiple hospitalisations and individual and family therapy.
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