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momck

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi - new here. In desperate need of support.
We are 6 weeks into day hospital treatment in Toronto. My 15yo D, (restrictive AN diagnosed 2 years ago, hospitalized 4 weeks, outpatient FBT for 2 years, weight restored but behaviours and thinking unchanged) is 6 weeks into an intensive outpatient programme. The demands on us as parents, on the rest of the family, my D's explosive behaviours....I am wondering if it is all too much. I don't even know if it will work and she is wearing me down. Most of the time I can keep it together. I keep my eyes on the prize and do one hour at a time but since entering the programme, ED is much worse, behaviour is increasingly unmanageable and I am struggling. It is hard to admit, but I resent the upheaval to my life. I resent that my other children no longer have a mother, that we no longer have dinner together, that I don't even remember to call my older kids who live away from home. It seems as though every minute of the day is consumed with ED - driving her, picking her up, running down to the hospital because she had a fit about something and needs a re-entry meeting, dealing with an outburst at home because something set her off. The answer that I keep getting is that I should take a leave from work, which is just not an option for my family. 
Today I am panicked because she has always eventually - sometimes after 10+ hours sitting at the table - eaten whatever she was refusing to eat. Friday night - well I guess Saturday morning at 3:30AM - I gave up for the first time and we went to bed without her finishing the thing she had been refusing to eat since 9PM. I am terrified that I have lost critical ground and don't know how to get it back. I have tried to consistently deliver the message that I am more tenacious than her eating disorder is. Now I have shown her that I am not. Yesterday she refused to eat and refused to sit at the table while she was refusing to eat. I am worried that I will not be able to get the ground rules back again.
Anyone have any words of advice? When she refuses to sit and refuses to eat, I feel this panic well up. Since she was diagnosed and we began the FBT I kept thinking that it was fine to do this when she was just 13 or 14 because she was young enough to recognize my parental authority. As she gets older, how do I as a parent get her to comply? How do I keep that parental control with a kid who is now 15 and tell her she cannot leave the table? In 6 months she will be 16 and I don't think that I will have any legal right to compel her to receive any treatment let alone force her to sit at a table at home. What will I do then?

tina72

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi momck,
a warm welcome here in this forum nobody wants to be member of. I am glad that you found us.
Looks like you have a long journey behind you. Here are my thoughts about what you have written:
No changes after WR in behaviour and thinking might mean that she was never really WR. A lot of us here experienced that the target weights set by professionals were way too low and had to be overtaken for progress. In some cases that means only a bit more weight gain, in other cases it needs a lot more weight gain. How do you know she was really WR? Did you have a target weight and kept her there or did you made her gain until behaviour changed?

That ED is worse now in day patient treatment might be because ED feels that there is something going on and that you are fighting it seriously. Most of us experienced that it is a dangerous thing when ED is calm and not seen at all. In many cases that meant that ED has found a way to trick you out. If you see the enemy, you know he is there.

Yes, it is hard for the whole family and the siblings and it is hard to be hopeful and confident when you are in that tunnel and don´t know if it will ever get better. But there is no other way to get back to light than to go through it.
I can imagine that you panicked because she didn´t eat it and you gave up. But you are a human being and not perfect and you fail sometimes, too. That is human. Try to get back to start and to the ground rules again. If she refuses to eat, tell that the daypatient staff and tell her that she will be fed by tube if necessary and that eating is not negotiable. If she doesn´t want to sit and eat, life stopps. If she doesn´t eat for more than 24 hours, get her to ER. Be aware that she might stop to drink, too. That is very dangerous.
She must learn that not eating has consequences. If ED wants to know wether you are consequent, it can learn that now.
You don´t need to get her to comply. That is life threatening and she has to do that. You require eating as you would require chemo therapie if it was cancer.

I don´t know how the legal rights are in Canada, here in Germany my d is "adult" in 2 months. I was afraid of that point, too, but other parents here showed me that we have power at that point left. We will have a contract on the legal site that we are in charge if she goes into IP again or cannot care for herself and we will have a privat contract about driving the car, going to school, going to university later and so on. They are legally "adult", but as long as you earn the money in the house they are not independent. You give the money, you pay for phone, school, car, so you set the rules. There is some power left.

Please ask some other parents from canada in a new threat for help with these legal things. I´m sure there will be somebody with good advices soon.

Age is not that big problem. We started FBT with 17 and there are even adults been treated with that. Yes, it is easier when they are younger, you have to be more a partner or a team at that elder age. But it is possible. Try to give her freedom with everything which has nothing to do with eating. But be straight and confident with refeeding. Food is medicine and without a proper WR it is not possible to heal the brain.
Ask whatever you need, there are always nice people to help you nearly 24/7...[wink]
Tina72
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi and welcome,
Tina has given great advice.
First and foremost as explained, it does not sound like she is WR.
Secondly, what is her " currency"? What can you use as leverage?
Thirdly - as an idea, would there be any way you could get to  the UCSD  five day family intensive? 
http://eatingdisorders.ucsd.edu/treatment/oneweek-intensive-treatment-programs.html

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #4 

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #5 

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #6 
http://tabithafarrar.com/2017/08/energy-deficit-energy-debt-target-weights-weight-vs-state-restoration-podcast/
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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #7 

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
momupnorth

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi momck,
I too am in the Toronto area...just north actually.
I know how you feel with being so worn out and worn down with no time for the rest of the family....I have been through this and am going through it again to a bit lesser extent.
May I ask where she is for treatment?  You say taking leave is not an option for your family.  I did not think it would be for me either, but then I discovered the pcic leave through ei. 
I also know how hard it is to be banging your head against the wall that is the law on consent in Canada.
If you would like to email me to chat more, feel free...I am always around for a chat.....

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Mom Up North
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #9 
I got a psychiatrist to prescribe me the maximum dose of antidepressants (which unfortunately don't kick in right away) and tranquilizers, which I took in small doses before feeding, and sometimes after. You need to do whatever it takes to help yourself get through this. 

Also sounds like you need to "fake it until you make it". Don't show fear or backing down. You can do things like say, "I have decided that we are taking a break and will return to this meal later, when I decide." But don't say "I give up, maybe later." Be sure to pretend like you are in total control, just to keep ED on edge. 

You can reframe what happened: "Here is your meal....I decided last night to take a break. Now here is what you need."

I well know the panic you describe. You need short-term leverage, as said below: "After you finish we can go get those fuzzy socks you like"; "After lunch the neighbor is bringing over that cute new puppy to play with"; and so on. Coming up with leverage is crucial, and difficult.
daddyg

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Reply with quote  #10 
I feel the exact same way, and I have no advice but to say never spend more money, energy, or time on this disease than you want to.  Al-anon is a great resource for tools, and information on taking care of your own physical, spiritual and emotional health.
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D diagnosed with AN January 2015, attended PHP, IOP, Residential 18 weeks, back to PHP, IOP 26 weeks, at home struggling, with 1 doc 1 therapy visit per week, til Christmas 2016, back in residential treatment now.
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #11 
I don't quite agree with DaddyG's formulation. All of us spend more money, energy and time on this illness than we want to--who would want to spend any at all? Frankly my daughter's recovery took me to all of my limits. It required me to throw out the window certain boundaries, reasonable expectations, etc.

It helps, though, to think of that kind of changes in reasonable standards as 1. short-term sacrifice in the interest of long-term health of child (and by proxy happiness of adults); 2. something that calls for superhero parenting--which means the parent needs absolutely as much support as s/he can muster. This is the time to ask friends, family, synagogue, whoever, to help out--take other siblings, do errands, etc. And get help for yourself as much as you can during this miserable time.

The goal is to shorten the misery of the throes of ED, and it is miserable. But then there is "the other side", and it's lovely here. I never thought I'd see it. Now I'm here to tell you that it's here, and you need to take as much care of yourself as you can while still giving yourself over, in the short term, to the demands of healing your kid from this awful illness.
bewell

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Reply with quote  #12 
Dear EC_Mom, how long did it take for you to "see the other side"? I could probably get an idea from your posts, but if you don't mind, maybe you can share your story/ timeline?
EC_Mom

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Reply with quote  #13 
Bewell, in early 2014 we realized my d was RAN and pulled together FBT after about 9 weeks (hadn't found ATDT yet). Then about 6 terrible weeks of refeeding where I made lots of mistakes and didn't do so well on weight gain, and a few days in hospital. Then 3 months of absolute hellish, all-consuming refeeding, during which I found ATDT and maintained heavy consistency,  and developed compassion too (Thanks Eva Musby!). Then 3-5 highly-supported, slowgoing, but mostly less hellish months. A few slips, where ED snuck back in. 6-10 more months of supervised eating and slooooooow handing over eating choices back to d, with some steps back here and there.

All told, the hellish times were about 7 months. Then there were somewhat bad, but not hellish times, for another 6 months. Then another year of watching carefully. We remain vigilant and always will, I imagine. 

It's not linear, it's not obvious that improvement is happening when it happens, and it is a LOT of hell before things get better. You must, however, remain confident that your love is stronger than ED. And if you aren't confident, fake the confidence. Your d will feel it (and ED will too--but that's ok).
martican

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Reply with quote  #14 
hi momck. I feel your despair. sounds like you are really committed to the strategies. I like ECmom's suggestions to win your control back. we had stagnant 1 year when my d was gaining and losing 2 lbs, so essentially, no progress. I took EI (I am in Ontario) and took time off work. That's when the weight started to come up. I felt less stressed ...well, comparing to dealing with work and ED vs. dealing with ED only. I had more patience and every possible moment, I tried to regroup for next meal. I also have another child, so I can imagine how worn out you feel, dealing with so much. did you try any leverage strategies? such as phone or internet? short term motivation?
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #15 
I don't agree with DaddyG at all either.  If we all did that, none of our kids would ever get better.

Having said that though, I do think you need to set hard and fast rules that are nonnegotiable.  I did not sit there for 10+ hours with a kid who refused to eat.  For my own sanity, I set time limits and anything not eaten was given in a supplement.  Any refusal of the supplement meant a trip to the ER (A&E). 

If she is already a day patient, I would start pushing for a higher level of care.  When my daughter had a fit in treatment, I went to a few of those meetings and then started telling them she was there just for that behavior and I wasn't going to run to the hospital on a daily basis to deal with it.  Sometimes you have to set firm boundaries even with the health professionals.  Some of us work for a living and don't have the luxury of taking time off work for behavior that should be expected. 

I also did not support any of her emotional dysregulation.  If she started having a fit, she went to her room until she could get herself under control (or I went to my room if she refused to leave).  I still did things but took her along.  I had to keep some semblance of a life or I'd have cracked too.  We still had dinner together or with friends.  If she refused to eat or acted up, she left until she could be in control again and then could join us, etc.  I wouldn't give up all your family time to the ED.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hi ,
I feel the opposite to Daddyg,
Spending my  money energy and time helping my Son through this awful illness was/is the least I can do for him.
Our kids did not choose this hideous disease , it is a biological brain illness.

Momck, Recovery is possible, and you can do this, we will try and help you.
I got my kid into solid recovery with the help of FEAST /ATDT. 

My Son is doing great, Food is the medicine.

Daddyg and momck, 
This may be worth reading...
https://cheriemonarch.com/2017/10/21/if-it-were-cancer/

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
momck

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thank you everyone for your heartfelt responses. Having this support helps. I am not even sure why but it feels better to know that you are all out there dealing with this mess just like I am. Things got worse over the weekend and I again had to call police when she became aggressive and hit me. This time they came out and supported me and it helped to get her back under control. I still find it shocking to see my sweet lovely daughter disappear when this ED beast descends upon her. This weekend she was "gone" for 2 days and I guess that just sets me off. It makes me wonder if she is still in there somewhere and whether I will see her again. Not long after the police left, she just came back and was chatting and joking with me as though all of the weekend's outbursts had never even happened. It is like she is possessed and then it suddenly lifts, which I suppose helps me remember that this is not her doing these things.
I worry so much about the collateral damage in all of this, namely my other children especially my 8 year old son. 
Some of you have said, and my friends always say "ask for help". I am struggling to think of how other people could help us with this. I have to be the one to deal with my daughter and then I just can't think of any way that other people could support us. Can anyone here share how they have enlisted the help and support of friends or family? One of my challenges is that just driving her down to the hospital and picking her up each day is an hour and 45 minute exercise in the morning and then again in the evening. Her father (we are separated) drives her down in the morning and I pick her up which has me getting home at around 7PM making it impossible to be with my younger son much or to have a family dinner with the rest of the kids. Has anyone figured out a great way to manage this? 
MJKZ - thnak you for the advice on not running down to the hospital every time she has a fit. I told them that this was impossible for me too and last week they allowed me to do the re-entry meeting over the phone which saved me the 3 and 1/2 hours it would have taken to go down there. The FBT is great and I understand the principles and it all sounds really nice, but my daughter has been doing it for 2 years. The demands on us as parents is outrageous and almost unbearable. I would and have done anything to get her better but sometimes I wonder if we are achieving anything at all and I get so disheartened. Anyone have any great advice for keeping positive? Any inspiring stories of recovery out there?
Thank you so much to everyone who has replied. It has been really helpful to me.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi,
I have an inspiring story of recovery.
Everything changed, and my kid turned the corner when I changed the way that I dealt with this illness.
Basically, I took complete control, and " faked it, until I made it", gave a confident air making  out that I knew what I was doing. I realised that my Kid was absolutely terrified, that he was underneath the illness not able to tell me that he wanted the food he refused, but the illness would not allow him to have it.
I became a " higher power than the illness, to be strong .and just push through, every meal , every day ..calm and consistent.
I learnt to separate my kid from the illness. I learnt that bad and all as it was for me it was 100 times worse for him. This gave me the strength to do this.
I had to clear my diary and deal with this 24/7 just as I would have for a cancer diagnosis.

I added butter and cream to all meals and he was "required" to eat, it was non negotiable.

Little by little , day by day, he started getting better and better.
Today he is in strong recovery and living like a normal teen. He has not refused a meal from me for 2 years. Food is the medicine.

__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #19 

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Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
mjkz

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Reply with quote  #20 
Glad to hear you were able to do that and the hospital respected it.  Can you ask the hospital if it would be possible to get some help with transportation?  Also I'd be asking them to reevaluate her for a higher level of care.  If she is getting violent at home and you had to call the police (good for you for doing that!!!), she needs more help that she is getting in intensive outpatient.  Can hubby do more?  Can he provide transportation to and from the hospital?  It sounds like you need to be home to have dinner with the rest of your kids and perhaps eat yourself with them to prepare for your daughter coming home to eat.  I seriously would limit the time you sit there and use a supplement to make up for what she doesn't eat.  If she refuses the supplement and going to ER/A&E is not an option, I would let the program know so they can add more calories in while she is there either to make up for the missed cals the night before or in preparation for less cals at night.

Other ways friends and family have helped me?  I don't have other kids but they still shopped for me, cleaned for me.  I would see if other family members could help with getting dinner for the rest of the kids.  I had them sit with my daughter around nonmeal times to give me a break.  Sometimes I was able to motivate my daughter to eat by letting her know a friend or family member was coming by to take her on an outing as soon as she finished.  They took her to movies, the zoo, etc.  Friends and family members could do that same for your daughter and the other kids too.  Friends ran errands for me.  I let people do everything they could around everything other than feeding my daughter and that crucial one hour after meals and snacks.
toothfairy

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Reply with quote  #21 
https://www.aroundthedinnertable.org/post/maudsley-approach-and-fbt-9298135?highlight=fbt+maudsley&trail=25#gsc.tab=0
__________________
Son,DX with AN, (purging type) in 2015 ,had 4 months immediate inpatient,then FBT at home since. He is now in strong recovery, (Phase 3 ) and Living life to the full, like a "normal"[biggrin] teen. This is with thanks to ATDT. Hoping to get him into full recovery and remission one day at a time. Getting him to a much higher weight, and with a much higher calorie plan than his clinicians gave him as a target, was instrumental to getting him to the strong recovery that he is in now. Food is the medicine.
tina72

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Reply with quote  #22 
Hi momck,
first on family/friends support:
Some of your family/friends might like to help but don´t know how. Try to ask for things.
They can help you with:

1) cooking (ask them to cook and freeze special meals and give them the reciepe)
2) cleaning the house, doing the laundry
3) shopping at the supermarket
4) stay with your d so you can have a walk, a nap, a bit of time for yourself (you remember what that is?[wink])
5) take out siblings for cinema, zoo, a stressless meal (at a burger restaurant [biggrin])
6) working in the garden, cutting the lawn, whatever
7) driving your d or siblings around to wherever is needed
8) force you to have a cup of coffee with them and vent a bit...

add this list with whetever could be helpful at the moment. You must be there for your d but it can be a great help not need to care for everything.

My advice for keeping positive:
Looking backwards I would say that we missed some little baby steps in recovery because we were not able to see them. One bad day gets you sooo down and the better or good days seem not to count. We started to mark our calender with colours: red for a really bad day, yellow for o.k. and green for a good day. First there were mostly red and only some yellow days, but after a few weeks we discovered that there was no red day in one week and then it was mostly yellow days and only a few red and a few green ones. Today we have mostly green days and only a few yellow and the last red day was marked at the beginning of october. Would that be worth a try?
Try to see the tiny steps. The first less cutting meals, the first meal without complaining, the first laughter in your house.

Our story in short version (just for giving some hope):
d (17) got down the rabbit hole slowly over 9 months in 2016 and was dx in 01/2017 for RAN
3 months really bad and old fashioned IP here in Germany, everything got worth (including self harm)
found FBT and ATDT coincidentally (thankful for that until the end of my life) and took her out asap
3 more months refeeding until WR with help by FBT trainer and this forum
back in school, social life, got her driving licence, finished all classes in school without any big gaps
slowly giving control back (today 2 meals and 2 snacks preparing on her own but supervised, lunch still plated), working on fear food
after 5 month WR and 1 kg above target weight big change in mood today
first second plate on last sunday [biggrin], also eating some small snacks extra (like M&Ms)

my d is back, still struggling and we watch her with eagle eyes, but she is back
we have a very strong binding at the moment and she sees that she needs help and she tries to help herself by following the "rules"
still a long way to go but I think total recovery might be possible
hope she can go to university next year

Hold on and keep going. It is a looong tunnel and you need some patience to see the light again but without going forward you cannot go through it.
It will get better, it just needs food and time.

Send you a big hug. You are not alone.
Tina72


mjkz

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Reply with quote  #23 
Momck, as hard as it is, don't give up.  My daughter was sick for almost two decades.  We went through every type of treatment and she was in and out of hospitals for most of her life.  We ran out of hospitals and options so we had to do it at home.  We did FBT when she was 21 and it was hellish.  We had a contract that was very specific and spelled out expectations for me and for her, consequences for not following the contract, etc.  I didn't ask if she wanted a contract or was willing to follow it.  I presented to her and said this is the way things are going to be.  She tested it every which way she could and I ended up kicking her out at one point.  She hit the lowest weight of her life and ended up involuntarily hospitalized and tube fed.  When she got out, she was much more willing to work with me and it has been a slow but steadily moving forward progress over years.  It really came down to her seeing the way life could be if I was not there and what she could be facing before she buckled down and did it my way.  She never wanted recovery and even to this day will not say she wants recovery.  She still has thoughts but now knows she has to eat no matter what.  She has not been hospitalized in years which is a miracle coming from someone who had some years where she was home less than three months the entire year. 

I'm stubborn and refused to let her die no matter how hard she tried.  My only regret is I didn't do FBT much sooner but she was already a YA and refused.  Once we had exhausted all options, then she was willing. 
Torie

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by momck
I again had to call police when she became aggressive and hit me. This time they came out and supported me and it helped to get her back under control.


Yay for calling the police!
momck: 1
ED: 0


Quote:
Originally Posted by momck
I still find it shocking to see my sweet lovely daughter disappear when this ED beast descends upon her.


It is the weirdest, creepiest thing ever, isn't it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by momck
This weekend she was "gone" for 2 days and I guess that just sets me off. It makes me wonder if she is still in there somewhere and whether I will see her again. Not long after the police left, she just came back and was chatting and joking with me as though all of the weekend's outbursts had never even happened. It is like she is possessed and then it suddenly lifts


Mercifully, they seem to forget about the worst of it.  Unfortunately, we don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by momck
Her father (we are separated) drives her down in the morning and I pick her up which has me getting home at around 7PM making it impossible to be with my younger son much or to have a family dinner with the rest of the kids. Has anyone figured out a great way to manage this? 


I'm with ToothFairy in wondering if your ex might do more.  Personally, I'd be inclined to write a note instead of a verbal conversation, explaining that it is simply not possible for you to meet all your children's needs under the current setup.  Sometimes it helps to be very specific in what you are asking for:  Could he drive your d both directions?  Prepare dinner for your other kids and eat with them?  Prepare meals and freeze them or drop them off?  

Hang in there, and don't forget that we're always with you in spirit.  xx

-Torie

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"We are angels of hope, of healing, and of light. Darkness flees from us." -YP 
hmhd60

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #25 
Hi.....first of all big hugs to you. We need to talk. We live outside the GTA, but my son who is 17.5 and been battling for about 2 years is in treatment there. If you could pm me, I think that would be good.
Breathe. One moment at a time.
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